Slant Magazine's Scores

For 2,671 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 33% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 65% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 9 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 53
Highest review score: 100 Stray Dogs
Lowest review score: 0 Scatter My Ashes at Bergdorf's
Score distribution:
2,671 movie reviews
  1. In the race to achieve unadulterated fourth-wall breakage, Tim and Eric's Billion Dollar Movie is the new pack leader.
  2. A heartfelt retro flashback littered with pop-culture iconography and much slang, it focuses on the importance of friendship and loyalty rather than social standing.
  3. In a cinema landscape where the representation of the black female experience is most visibly explored through the modes of outlandish comedy, unironic melodrama, or not at all, Ava DuVernay's take is a decidedly refreshing one.
  4. R
    If the trajectory of R foreshadows tragedy early and often (what prison film doesn't?), the filmmakers manage to infuse quiet moments of reflection and panic into each man's traumatic experience.
  5. As rigorous and stimulating as its thematic inquiries are, A Dangerous Method ultimately rests as much on its performances, and in that regard, it succeeds far more than it fails.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    J.C. Chandor's fondness for situational irony is empowered by the spartan efficiency of his method, and that of most of his performers.
  6. In keeping his actors on his sober-yet-buoyant plane, Kenneth Branagh presents a convincing romance that doesn't stall the film's brisk clip.
  7. You can't help but be impressed by how much it represents a natural, even defensive evolutionary step on its creator's part.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    These SoCal kids are passionate about their craft and it shows in their renditions of the famous bard's work.
  8. The ghostliness of the Kunsthistorisches Museum in Vienna derives from an identity crisis, where digitization threatens to eradicate the gallery space.
  9. A neatly balanced tragicomedy about the easily blurred line between assisted living and assisted death.
  10. Shit Year is a thematic twin to Billy Wilder's "Sunset Boulevard," both heightened fables about the slow disintegration of a retired actress mourning her now-dead career by retreating inward.
  11. The film is as emotionally manipulative as the show, but it's never appeared more truthful in its aspiration to inspire - and profit in the process.
  12. A fawning tribute to the cult legend, enriched by a subtle current of sadness that prevents the documentary from turning into a glorified DVD supplement.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Even stronger than its predecessor, which didn't quite go as far in terms of representing these young women in a wider context.
  13. Lawless may be full of half-hearted overtures toward depth and emotional complexity, but the film's prestige sheen is mostly a sham; the real focus here is the irrepressible lure of bad behavior.
  14. Thanks to Melanie Lynskey's performance, the movie feels like a believably worked-out, sympathetically presented study in thirtysomething uncertainty.
  15. The second act shifts the film from a lazy and comfy litany of introductions to a riveting fantasia of pure cinema, wherein Lee paints an oft-wordless picture of nature's harshness and grace, the perfect arena for Pi to have a Christ-like coming of age.
  16. In whittling down Emily Brontë's romance to its most earthly aspects, Andrea Arnold stylizes herself into an unavoidable corner.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    At once familiar and enigmatic, Javier Rebollo's The Dead Man and Being Happy feels like a connect-the-dots film with a few lines artfully blurred.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Most compelling in Christian Petzold's latest is the way the filmmaker adeptly conducts his tides of Cold War paranoia.
  17. Whatever your foreknowledge of low-budget Brooklyn dramedies, it's impossible that Gillian Robespierre's film won't lob you at least a few curveballs.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    High school students (the jocks, the brains, the princesses, the criminals, the basket cases), long the favored prey of serial killers, somehow manage to fight back from the brink yet again in Detention, a bright, witty new genre mash-up.
  18. Gabe Polsky's quiet yet welcome achievement is to allow us to see the individual amid the politics, clearly and sympathetically.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    The film remains buoyed by the same open heart that makes Tyler Perry's best work so endearing.
  19. A modestly charming bit of whimsy that hopes to speak to anyone who experienced a sense of emotional injustice during their formative years.
  20. This bio-documentary of a New Left godfather presents a formidable character simpatico with today's zeitgeist in his championing of "spontaneous uprising."
  21. A prismatic meditation on an entire nation, Eliav Lilti's documentary is history as abstraction.
  22. Pairing again after the mad success of "Juno," Cody and Reitman prove a canny team when it comes to capturing frank yet polished modernity, getting at truths of the here and now even if a certain excess of gloss denies them the full Americana humanism of someone like Alexander Payne.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    One of the effects of Harmony Korine's feverish, hypnotic style is that the whole thing feels like a fantasy—or rather a nightmare perversion of the American dream.

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