Slant Magazine's Scores

For 3,788 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 33% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 65% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 8.7 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 54
Highest review score: 100 Stray Dogs
Lowest review score: 0 Nothing Bad Can Happen
Score distribution:
3788 movie reviews
  1. Everything in the film is understood to be a subsumed sex act, with actual sex serving as a contextualizing catharsis.
  2. The documentary makes you wonder about every beautiful woman who's ever stared out from a publication, poster, or billboard, looking sophisticated and self-assured.
  3. Peter Strickland charges full-tilt into the objectifying whims of his fantasies in order to somehow reach the other end of perception, which acknowledges the ultimate empathetic limitations of said fantasies.
  4. A dizzying hall-of-mirrors stunt, a horror remake as autobiographical X-ray, and a work of fantasy that serves as a decadently cleansing creative exorcism.
  5. Something like a trippy grindhouse homage whose familiar images are refracted through a prism of blacklight posters, Jodorowsky films, and even Rob Zombie's grungy psychotropic sensibility.
  6. It's a quiet thud of a film, which embraces, with grace and precision, the nastiness of growing up with desire stuck in one's throat like a muffled scream.
  7. With The Devil's Backbone, Del Toro pulls an Amenábar by dishing out sophisticated war commentary with bone-chilling dread.
  8. Biopics ascribe titanic importance to a subject's every gesture, but Ferrara stresses the reality of creation, of its ordinary activities that nonetheless give an artist a sense of fulfillment.
  9. This lovely film is ultimately an articulation of something at once simple and universal: the discontent of traveling through life with sad resignation.
  10. Very few films accept the contradicting velocities of gay desire, and present them in such blunt yet graceful fashion, the way Paris 05:59 does.
  11. Compared to "Breathless," Le Petit Soldat's images suggest a stronger sense of place, as characters seem inextricably linked to their environment. Overall, the film lacks the artifice of Hollywood cinema, which Godard admired but was looking to move past after catching flack from the French left wing.
  12. Sarah Polley is much more interested in the malleability of memory and the consequential refractions felt throughout her kin rather than telling a linear narrative.
  13. The film's beguiling visual poetry and smatterings of sociological subtext function less than coherently as transitional markers between cinematic epochs, or even as the nascent burblings of any imminent DIY revolution; instead, they're redolent of a modernist apotheosis.
  14. The courtroom's cramped, near-featureless air of bureaucratic stagnation becomes oppressive even for the audience, making it easy to identify with Viviane's growing hunger for freedom.
  15. It routinely alternating between episodes that contrast exhilaration with exploitation and damnation.
  16. Spotting and processing the countless differences between the parts offers pleasures on various levels.
  17. Presents a cast of characters who must continue fighting, for what's at stake is the very real, very imminent threat of their own deaths.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    A marvelously elastic storyteller, a dry wit, and a Rivettean anti-determinist, the Chilean auteur Raúl Ruiz is fascinated by narratives that dilate from within, images seemingly full of secret passageways, and fabulists who collect tales like toys.
  18. An astute summation of Mike Leigh's glum view of humanity, but also a challenge to this disposition and his own pessimistic perspective.
  19. Decolonization in Black Girl isn't only a myth, but also a myth that actually strengthens the consumerist caste systems.
  20. A wide-ranging piece of literary criticism brought to vivid cinematic life, bursting with ideas and inspired visual translations of them.
  21. The film has an atmosphere of endless experimentation, which compliments the constant revision the subjects apply to their lives in the wake of their economic insecurity.
  22. The film enables us to feel the emotional weight of a posthumous letter precisely because we can only imagine its contents.
  23. Elena is a film deeply concerned with class resentment, but the filmmakers' attitude toward their titular character is disconcerting and even shocking.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Bi Gan's film is a soulful depiction of China's increasingly rapid pace of cultural and economic transformation.
  24. The conclusion is a testament to the fact that authentic justice is probably only attainable by accident.
  25. Evan Glodell's debut has the sweetness of a lullaby reverie and the blazing ferocity of a monster-car nightmare, a first-comes-elation, then-comes-madness structure that resembles that of "Blue Valentine," another tale focused on the commencement, and then collapse, of an affair.
  26. Roberto Minervini's documentary is as quintessentially American a text as one could hope for in today's divided union.
  27. A film for those who, whether here or in Israel, believe the law is the beginning, and not the end, of rights discourse.
  28. Marc H. Simon's documentary has the thrust of a great American noir or black comedy.

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