Slant Magazine's Scores

For 3,894 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 33% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 65% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 8.7 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 54
Highest review score: 100 You're Next
Lowest review score: 0 Good for Nothing
Score distribution:
3894 movie reviews
  1. Baby Driver literalizes Edgar Wright’s fascination with people’s emotional overreliance on pop culture as a cover for arrested development.
  2. Joe Swanberg's films have grown into a reliable relief from the competitive, dehumanizing freneticism of much of American culture, marked by an affirming and understated sense of decency.
  3. A real yet illusory world is evoked so seamlessly that it also feels just one step away from pure cinematic fiction.
  4. A work of astounding sensitivity and precision, it argues for emotional honesty as a moral and psychic imperative.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Upstream Color is lush, rhythmic, and deeply sensual, a film of exceptional beauty.
  5. Israel's fractured psyche is plumbed via narrative splintering in Policeman, Nadav Lapid's compelling drama about his homeland's burgeoning social unrest.
  6. Lino Brocka's portrait of familial treachery and societal abandonment channels its melodrama through the filter of neorealism.
  7. John Wick: Chapter 2 remarkably balances its predecessor’s spartan characterizations and plotting with a significant expansion of scale.
  8. The exquisite live-action Quill: The Life of a Guide Dog may be the family film of the year.
  9. It lulls us into its reckless passivity to the point that even the comedic duds possess a languid hint of funny.
  10. Jessica Hausner is less interested in historical revisionism than mining this real-life tragedy for its existential thrust.
  11. It elegantly evolves from an absurdist comedy into a remarkably wounded and uprooted story of friends who're beginning to tire of their shared social cocoons.
  12. As played by an eloquently beleaguered Oscar Isaac, Llewyn Davis is arguably the most vivid and complex character the Coens have dreamed up since Marge Gunderson.
  13. The geometry of human relationships is the main theme of Hong Sang-soo's The Day He Arrives.
  14. The cautious optimism with which it answers questions about rehabilitation and forgiveness is credible because the characters and setting feel so thoroughly authentic.
  15. It conjures a menacing perspective on how the titular occupation hulls out empathy and cultivates a particularly unsettling strain of cynicism.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    If The Kid with a Bike is a fairy tale, it's the unsentimental kind that locates the dark enchantment in characters discovering themselves during their most despairing moments. Still, it's certainly the Dardennes' fleetest, warmest film to date.
  16. It revives hope for a pop-art cinema that's capable of treating characters like actual human beings rather than pawns on a chess board.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    The film follows its refugee subjects closely but with a physical and narrative distance that respects their independence.
  17. Beautiful, poetic, and hard-hitting without the use of excessive force and deeply layered with evolving and regional nuances of feminine experience
  18. Alfonso Cuarón's triumph is an invigoratingly clean, elegant display of action choreography, a La Région Centrale you can still take grandma to see.
  19. Albert Maysles's portrait of Iris Apfel gradually emerges with cathartic clarity without compromising her inherent mystery.
  20. Its allegory for internalized homophobia, a gay man's perilous attraction to straightness itself, seems in this case deeply persona.
  21. The soft colors, graceful movements, and clean lines together embody the ineffable beauty of life on Earth that is one of the film's main themes.
  22. Sion Sono's film is a vision of coming of age as trial by fire, a thunderous encapsulation of that period of transition in which adolescents try to discover themselves: their passions, their purpose, their sense of morality.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    An inspirational and heartbreaking nail-biter, The Interrupters was more difficult for me to watch than any battle documentary I've seen in years.
  23. The film communicates a sporadic sense of violation—of pastiche unpredictably giving way to a raw and primordially intimate emotional realm.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    The evocation of things ending suffuses the film with melancholy, as Anders increasingly becomes an observant rather than a participant in his own life.
  24. Ross McElwee is less anxious of death itself than of finally comprehending the vast faultiness of the life he's lived.
  25. As with Selma, filmmaker Ava DuVernay has fashioned a work of pummeling and clear-eyed intelligence.

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