Slant Magazine's Scores

For 2,752 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 33% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 65% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 9 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 53
Highest review score: 100 Tomboy
Lowest review score: 0 Girl Most Likely
Score distribution:
2,752 movie reviews
  1. The Frankensteinian rebellion of orcas against their corporate captors turns this doc into a sort of showbiz horror film.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Smartly, Sebastian Dehnhardt's film eschews hype and goes far beyond mere talk, shows as well as tells, by including fascinatingly instructive slow- mo shots of both men's fights to highlight the differences between the brawny duo, often mistaken for identical twins.
  2. The story wisely focuses on the cast's worn-in and jazzy repartee and expresses a perfectly modulated sense of self-awareness.
  3. The film is so unusually moving and penetrating because it refuses to cloud its emotions in distancing irony, anger, or nihilism.
  4. It's the rare coming-of-age narrative that manages to respect the tricky ambiguities of shifting perceptions.
  5. What progressively mounts tension is the film's understanding of a boy's gradually realized homosexuality as being inextricable from the central metaphor of compromised vision.
  6. One doesn't have to look too closely at Carnage's final shot to marvel at the way Polanski refuses to haughtily indict his audience in the pettiness of his characters' behavior.
  7. Folklore, rituals, and the past weigh heavily on Silent Souls, which is somewhat endemic of films from Fedorchenko's home country of Russia.
  8. Its discursiveness does have the intriguing effect of leaving behind a myriad of impressions about its subjects rather than settling on pat interpretations.
  9. It's to Carine Roitfeld's own credit and director Fabien Constant's funky and frenetic pacing that the doc feels neither like a corporate hagiography nor like mere fashionista masturbation material.
  10. '71
    It distinguishes itself from Pual Greengrass's films by virtue of its close attention to political and moral ambiguities.
  11. Ursula Meier's film is sustained by a sturdy emotional engine and some intrepidly thoughtful characterization.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    The earthiest of Japanese New Wave directors, Shohei Imamura goes fascinatingly meta in this 1967 hybrid of investigative tract and ruminative experiment.
  12. Instead of finding one consistent tone and sticking to it, Serge Bozon allows the wildly hilarious and the grimly serious to uneasily coexist, exulting in the resultant clash.
  13. It compellingly captures a family wrestling mightily with the riddles and contradictions of a culture that promotes achievement at all costs with little thought as to what that actually means.
  14. Filmmakers Stephanie Spray and Pacho Velez insist that altered spectatorship, particularly patience and duration, is the foundation of cinematic edification.
  15. It's a final film in the specific sense of Raúl Ruiz designing the larger part of it around a metaphorical contemplation of his own, imminent demise.
  16. Director John McNaughton, once an agile orchestrator of seemingly incompatible tones, has retained his talent for teasing insinuation.
  17. Alejandro Landes's Porfirio is an ugly movie to watch, but it's not without purpose.
  18. Simultaneously both archetypal Tyler Perry and another step in the direction of nuance and thoughtfulness for the filmmaker.
  19. The film is in part an exceedingly black comedy that parodies proper society's eager, self-righteous naïveté on the subject of its children.
  20. Volker Sattel takes us on a blank-eyed tour of the country's biggest plants (plus a few from Austria), exposing both the tenuous balance of precision and innovation that has provided 20th-century Western society with its most controversial power source.
  21. Like a number of cult directors to emerge in the 1970s, Henry Jaglom values a party atmosphere at the expense of narrative cohesion.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Nathan Silver's film is a quiet and affecting micro-budgeted drama, its condensed frame evoking the claustrophobic feeling of the household it examines.
  22. This is a fanboy movie, one more engaged with the excitement of possibility than that of reality, and whatever the noxious connotations of that form of film appreciation, this particular project does a pretty fantastic job of stirring up enthusiasm.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Noah Baumbach's film feels like too perfect a portrait of quarter-life malady, down to the rushed redemptive endnotes and Greta Gerwig's idealized heroine.
  23. In its visionary dream and flashback sequences, the film becomes a comment on the rapidly diminished state of traditional animation.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Slowly, the powerful message of heart and soul winning out over an impaired body and over-thinking mind develops into the core drama of this otherwise modest doc.
  24. In the film, Alexander Payne's overview of America is extraordinarily, multifariously profound.
  25. It puts the viewer inside Maidan, allowing them to draw their own conclusions about the ideas and agendas espoused by the movement's leaders and participants.

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