Slant Magazine's Scores

For 3,637 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 33% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 65% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 8.8 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 53
Highest review score: 100 Gangs of Wasseypur
Lowest review score: 0 Love, Wedding, Marriage
Score distribution:
3637 movie reviews
    • 75 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    A brief history of time and space, according to Bertrand Bonello.
  1. Gillo Pontecorvo’s The Battle of Algiers is a political tract that understands itself also as a cinematic exercise.
  2. We know nothing of this woman’s inner-traumas, the repressed memories or hidden pains of her youth, yet Moore, in an extraordinary milestone performance, gives us a glimpse inside Carol’s frail and lonely soul.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    An ordinary drama embellished and in some sense infringed on by genre elements rather than the other way around.
  3. Alain Guiraudie's film portrays cruising as a danger-seeking and astoundingly repetitive affair, intimately linked to death itself.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    It's in his generous, objective use of long shots and spare but startling close-ups that we see once again the influence of Robert Altman in Yang's aesthetic and the struggle of the Taiwanese people to accept their history. In essence, Yang uses his aesthetic to bring into the light that which is dark.
  4. The film's criticism isn't primarily rooted in satire, but rather in fury and condemnation for those who seek to be gods while shamefully feigning to follow and praise one god.
    • 100 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    As befits a filmmaker who defined as well as challenged the definition of Italian neorealism, Voyage to Italy unfolds as a thorny narrative and a profoundly personal documentary.
  5. True to its title, the film approaches death as both narrative endpoint and formal focus, its initial vivacious mischief giving way to a Manichean fable about the waning of the light.
  6. The film is further confirmation of Mia Hansen-Løve’s delicately devastating ear and touch as a filmmaker.
  7. Demon offers a tidal wave of unrelieved longing and regret, with a devilish streak of absurdism.
  8. A Spike Lee joint in the urgent sociopolitical register of Radio Raheem's boombox—a call to arms that's also a call to disarm.
  9. Love it or hate it, it's doubtful you'll ever forget it, and it may just force you to redefine your definition of what constitutes "good" cinema.
  10. Costa's storytelling is illusory at best, but Horse Money's self-contradictions are communicated not via plot half as much as in scenography, even in the costuming.
  11. The film uses its male-on-male boundary-leaping to give the shopworn man-boy narrative a refresh.
  12. The Lost City of Z links every weathered look that Percy Fawcett throws to the heart of his spiritual yearning.
  13. The film, never sensational or saccharine, is a tough but tender tribute to the creative power of maternal love.
  14. The film's 90 minutes are a disorienting cyclone of destructive incidents and propulsive energy.
  15. The plot is pure pulp, inspired in equal parts by the tropes and imagery of film noir, grand opera, and silent melodrama.
  16. Keith Fulton and Louis Pepe's documentary raises important questions about the limits of pedagogy.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    The film becomes akin to variations on a theme, executed with visual finesse, and enhanced by its many rich textures.
  17. Wang Bing intends to give back to the inmates the opportunity for individual expression that society has robbed them of.
  18. A ferocious plea for character salvation within a milieu where money and bodily affect are the raison d'être for human existence.
  19. Na Hong-jin's The Wailing is a work of thriller maximal-ism, a rare case of more actually being more rather than less.
  20. Cinema hasn't been this close to the dusty cogs of desire's machinery and unapologetic about pleasure since Pasolini.
  21. A madly creative, darkly comical, and fiendishly self-aware actioner with muscle to spare.
  22. Alain Resnais's overpoweringly beautiful final film dares to push through the ghosts that inhabit the present, standing between the pessimism of an ill-spent past and the optimism of an undefined future.
  23. A scintillating sci-fi throwback, Vanishing Waves draws inspiration from Stanley Kubrick and Andrei Tarkovsky, among others, but without feeling plagiaristic.
  24. Private Property abounds in inventive low-budget filmmaking while stress-testing a pulpy, dime-store premise.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Bond's latest is a remarkable high watermark for the series: at once solemn and deeply funny, sexy and sad, self-conscious without all the rib-bruising elbowing.

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