Slant Magazine's Scores

For 2,429 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 32% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 66% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 9.3 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 52
Highest review score: 100 Museum Hours
Lowest review score: 0 The Darkest Hour
Score distribution:
2,429 movie reviews
  1. Director David Gelb details, among other things, the painstaking process that goes into creating mouthwatering pieces of sushi.
  2. The film is ultimately winning because of its devilish anarchic streak, aiming its arrows at the stuffiness of the traditional musical establishment.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    These SoCal kids are passionate about their craft and it shows in their renditions of the famous bard's work.
  3. Convento is an unusual experimental film that conjures the free-floating aura of a dream, only without the stylized, hyper-symbolic imagery that we generally associate with films attempting to convey dream states.
  4. Like many almost-great comedies, 21 Jump Street is frontloaded with the best go-for-broke gags and lines.
  5. Hovering over the narrative is the fear of the domino effect that change can enact, the dread that one person's "queerness" may perhaps expose everyone else's.
  6. Its director's romantic sensibilities wed to Terrence Rattigan's 60-year-old play, this period drama is buoyed by Rachel Weisz's poignant embodiment of a bourgeois wife seeking erotic autonomy.
  7. The film has a shambling charm that actively disputes an unspoken notion that a documentary must be well-structured in order to effectively land its points.
  8. The Hunger Games is more notable for the holes it doesn't fall into than the great heights it reaches.
  9. The film successfully positions its point of view with the developing countries that suffer the most immediate consequences of global warming rather than the developed countries most responsible for climate change and from whose citizenry Jon Shenk's prospective audience is likely to be drawn.
  10. A true-crime documentary of invigorating analytical clarity and evenhandedness.
  11. The film has an exhilarating tossed-off quality that characterized many of the most entertaining works of the French New Wave.
  12. While We the Party can be insensitive, or blind, to the misogyny and homophobia of the general culture (the token gay teen is a finger-snapping, head-bobbing fashionista), it takes the issues of race and class quite seriously.
  13. One of the more intimate and revealing looks at American projects ever made; it's assured and empathetic without indulging in fashionable white guilt.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    By turning the idea of progress on its head, the nimble Surviving Progress exquisitely presents to us the possibility that humankind's achievements may cause its downfall.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    High school students (the jocks, the brains, the princesses, the criminals, the basket cases), long the favored prey of serial killers, somehow manage to fight back from the brink yet again in Detention, a bright, witty new genre mash-up.
  14. After what seems like an eternity of inanity and incompetence in the realm of Cats & Dogs and Squeakquels, the Farrelly brothers' direction is downright classical.
  15. The movie's final act tries, somewhat admirably, to consolidate the plot's myriad interpersonal conflicts.
  16. Fightville's most worthwhile material tends to lie in the space between what its subjects say and what we know to be true.
  17. While Michael Glawogger does make overtures in the wrong directions, he usually seems to know where to steer his material.
  18. It's a simple story of simple people intentionally told in simple terms, and the only issues with which it's concerned are those of pure personal connection.
  19. There's something to be said about a two-and-a-half-hour war epic that manages to make each of its countless decapitation scenes feel earned, even called for, in the moment.
  20. The film proves that neither gross-out gags nor pseudo-sophisticated Woody Allenisms are necessary to make a smart, funny comedy.
  21. Documentarian and subject, past and present blur together like bleeding watercolors in Raymond De Felitta's gripping memoir.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    The documentary twists out its six narrative threads with measured compassion and even-handedness.
  22. It does lightly suggest scintillating questions about the responsibility artists have in reflecting current political moments in their music.
  23. Goss's film carries its unique forms of narrative suspense, but her 16mm images imbue both the forbidding landscape and her characters' scientific aerie, though the observatory only dates from 1932, with a poetry of the seemingly eternal.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    It may be baked with the same ingredients that come in your standard mumblecore starter kit, but because of Matt D'Elia's indebtedness to other movies, the film follows a different recipe altogether.
  24. The documentary provides a birdsong of perseverance in the face of irrational violence, immense historic anger, and grim, seemingly insurmountable realities.
  25. Julia Murat shows a fine grasp of form, letting her technique reflect the elements and moods of her story.

Top Trailers