Slant Magazine's Scores

For 3,690 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 33% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 65% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 8.7 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 54
Highest review score: 100 Scarecrow
Lowest review score: 0 Third Person
Score distribution:
3690 movie reviews
  1. Alfonso Cuarón's triumph is an invigoratingly clean, elegant display of action choreography, a La Région Centrale you can still take grandma to see.
  2. Albert Maysles's portrait of Iris Apfel gradually emerges with cathartic clarity without compromising her inherent mystery.
  3. Its allegory for internalized homophobia, a gay man's perilous attraction to straightness itself, seems in this case deeply persona.
  4. The soft colors, graceful movements, and clean lines together embody the ineffable beauty of life on Earth that is one of the film's main themes.
  5. Sion Sono's film is a vision of coming of age as trial by fire, a thunderous encapsulation of that period of transition in which adolescents try to discover themselves: their passions, their purpose, their sense of morality.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    An inspirational and heartbreaking nail-biter, The Interrupters was more difficult for me to watch than any battle documentary I've seen in years.
  6. The film communicates a sporadic sense of violation—of pastiche unpredictably giving way to a raw and primordially intimate emotional realm.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    The evocation of things ending suffuses the film with melancholy, as Anders increasingly becomes an observant rather than a participant in his own life.
  7. Ross McElwee is less anxious of death itself than of finally comprehending the vast faultiness of the life he's lived.
  8. As with Selma, filmmaker Ava DuVernay has fashioned a work of pummeling and clear-eyed intelligence.
  9. Regarding Michel Piccoli's Max, Claude Sautet's film resists judgment, neither condoning nor signposting the despicable nature of his choices.
  10. With the film, Lee Daniels quietly pushes his talent for hashing out visceral, violent emotions into unexpected dramatic terrain.
  11. These films have always been about the power of words, their ability to bridge gulfs of time and space, the thrill of ideas and opinions taking definitive shape.
  12. Staring deep into the darkness of an apparently static character, Nuri Bilge Ceylan again exhibits his gift for making interesting stories out of predetermined plots, locating small eddies of change in the midst of eternally fixed dynamics.
  13. Although the film remains continually fanciful, it always reminds us of the stakes in which precocious childhood rubs up against the possibility of a childhood denied altogether.
  14. The film is a conversation between two disadvantaged artists with indelible personalities, both of whom are unabashedly manipulating their way into at least the esoteric side of the everlasting.
  15. The film doesn't so much bring us closer to the serial murderer as it reminds us of our culpability as spectators.
  16. Tim Heidecker's Swanson does not amuse us in spite of the pity he inspires but because of it.
  17. The film has an artisanal intensity that prevents it from turning into a smug and predictable exercise in political revision.
  18. What Omar best portrays are the limitations that result from having an occupation, and the fight to overthrow it, dominate a person's entire life.
  19. While Jonathan Lisecki is well in tune with his film's niche market, his knack for comedy, both visual and verbal, is universally hilarious.
  20. Given its nearly episodic structure, formal choices, and similar thematic inquiries, Sworn Virgin suggests an unofficial remake of Vivre Sa Vie.
  21. The film captures Vreeland's perhaps unwitting philosophical integrity just as much as it drowns us in the exuberance of her work.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    In essentially offering up The Twelfth Night as a hazy Shakespearean mash-up, Viola isn't so much deeply disrespecting notions of ownership, authorship, etc., as charitably redefining them.
  22. Eliza Hittman's film captures the exclusive properties of sex with a degree of intimacy and empathy that, at times, feels authentically revelatory.
  23. Yourself and Yours‘s commitment to its various extreme ambiguities is a crucial facet of the film’s success.
  24. The film ultimately understands poverty as a profound and often irreversible desolation of terra firma.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Minimalist in its aesthetics and soundtrack, quiet and deliberate in its plot, but nonetheless familiar--endearing and a vital addition to the small but growing Tibetan cinema.
  25. The film unapologetically warns us at every turn that fashion is nothing but a business, fueled by naiveté and rape.
  26. Director Ira Sachs transforms the smallest blip on life's radar, a childhood friendship, into a momentous occasion.

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