Slant Magazine's Scores

For 2,432 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 33% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 65% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 9.4 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 52
Highest review score: 100 You're Next
Lowest review score: 0 Here Comes the Boom
Score distribution:
2,432 movie reviews
  1. Manages to be intimate and impersonal at the same time, a trait constantly reinforced by his portrayal of not only Ceausescu but the populace he led, represented, and controlled for nearly three decades.
  2. True to Hollywood's tireless efforts to fit square-peg material into roundish genre niches, this wavering, intermittently smart story of daring to think differently flattens its narrative into formula.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Brief Encounters is great entertainment.
  3. Steven Spielberg's film may further the heroism so associated with its subject, and favor a liberal viewpoint that leers down at the Confederates, but it's no bleeding-heart glamorization.
  4. The film is a testament to the power of video to document resistance to corrupt and abusive regimes, but it's also a witness to the limits of that power.
  5. Filmmakers Stephanie Spray and Pacho Velez insist that altered spectatorship, particularly patience and duration, is the foundation of cinematic edification.
  6. In the film, Alexander Payne's overview of America is extraordinarily, multifariously profound.
  7. We're simply presented a person in trouble, and we're allowed to recognize his problems as extreme embodiments of universal issues of terror, confusion, and loneliness.
  8. The repetitive rhythms of Joaquim Pinto's daily routines provide the film with a feeling of serenity that stands in contrast to the man's underlying anxiety.
  9. Presents a cast of characters who must continue fighting, for what's at stake is the very real, very imminent threat of their own deaths.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Most compelling in Christian Petzold's latest is the way the filmmaker adeptly conducts his tides of Cold War paranoia.
  10. Paolo Sorrentino's film is really just a huge turn-on that has the bad manners to go sour, succumbing to its own self-delusions of moral/political grandeur.
  11. The film is a singularly huge, relentless, all-encompassing set piece that mutates and spasms with terrifying lack of foresight. It's all business, business, business.
  12. Undeniably rousing, but deeply irresponsible, Argo fans the flames surrounding historical events likely to still remain raw in the memory of many viewers.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The Master is Paul Thomas Anderson with the edges sanded off, the best bits shorn down to nubs.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    J.C. Chandor's fondness for situational irony is empowered by the spartan efficiency of his method, and that of most of his performers.
  13. The film exudes a sense of fleetingness; however static these lives may be, Tian's narrative perfectly evokes a changing season.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    An inspirational and heartbreaking nail-biter, The Interrupters was more difficult for me to watch than any battle documentary I've seen in years.
  14. It's in the way the film refuses to characterize its central friendship solely on the grounds of common isolation that becomes its most endearing quality.
  15. An unnerving, all-archival account of Philadelphia citizens suddenly terrorized by the unchecked violence of rogue "law and order."
  16. Broomfield isn't so much dedicated to journalistic truth or social ethnography as he is displaying bodies and mindsets of individuals that complicate any sense of Manichean polemics, where good and evil must be reckoned with at a purely secular and corporeal level, particularly along the lines of class and gender.
  17. Benh Zeitlin's lived-in, almost abstract sense of social realism is partly what makes the film so refreshing and uniquely affecting.
  18. Eleanor Burke and Ron Eyal's film is a tasteful, well-orchestrated drama that never reaches beyond its humble means.
  19. In the Mood For Love is ravishing beyond mortal words.
  20. Order may be restored to the Circus, the "bad" elements weeded out, but in the jaundiced world the film has spent the last two hours so effectively delineating, the barriers between good and evil have been shown to be essentially meaningless.
  21. It's not easy to give a character study concerning mental illness the aspect of a psychological thriller without some notes of exploitation or trivialization creeping in, and Take Shelter makes a few missteps.
  22. Farhadi navigates his complicated narrative thicket with an apparent ease that confirms yet again that he's an amazing talent, but here he isn't able to blend the brushstrokes as he has in prior films.
  23. The Tree of Life's fetching images are like glowing shards of glass, and together they form a grandiose mirror that reflects Malick's impassioned philosophical outlook. It's unquestionably this great filmmaker's most personal work, a revelation of how he came to be, why he creates, and where he feels he's going.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    The Long Day Closes posits its pubescent protagonist as a tiny camera absorbing and transforming the reality all around him.
  24. Sensitively performed and laced with some forceful quotidian grit, the film evades the larger questions behind a scandalous shooting death.

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