Slant Magazine's Scores

For 2,323 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 32% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 66% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 9.5 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 52
Highest review score: 100 Days of Heaven
Lowest review score: 0 Snowmen
Score distribution:
2,323 movie reviews
  1. Steeped in De Palma's glorious violence and sinuous cinematography, but stripped of his tricky sensuality and his anarchic self-reflective wit, The Untouchables boils down to a lot of talk.
  2. The second act shifts the film from a lazy and comfy litany of introductions to a riveting fantasia of pure cinema, wherein Lee paints an oft-wordless picture of nature's harshness and grace, the perfect arena for Pi to have a Christ-like coming of age.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Renate Costa's doc gradually simplifies into an elaborate seesaw between general, journalistic scoopery and unabashedly personal confrontation.
  3. More than just a relationship drama of striking specificity, this is a naked confession about addiction.
  4. The film unfolds in unhurried dramatic terms that come to take on an almost fatalistic force.
  5. Despite crafting a consistently engaging film, the director doesn't present the full scope of Sixto Rodriguez's life.
  6. A film for those who, whether here or in Israel, believe the law is the beginning, and not the end, of rights discourse.
  7. It's occasionally too icily removed, but it compensates through its perpetual concern with understanding its characters and their untenable situations.
  8. The filmmakers spend vastly more time chronicling bigoted remarks from Romanians about gypsy life than they do actual gypsy life, so a minor crisis of perspective hangs over Our School.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    A lot of critics will talk about how the movie is a stripped-down, "pure" genre piece, and there's a lot of truth to that. What may not get as much press is the way stripped-down-ness is an affectation, and always has been.
  9. Hong Sang-soo once again corroborates auteurist theory at the same time that he reveals the potential shortcomings of its practice.
  10. Enough can't be said about how the late James Gandolfini comes so close to saving writer-director Nicole Holofcener's latest articulation of white suburban anxieties.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Claude Lanzmann's film doesn't so much strive to elucidate the Shoah as to draw us into its infinite moral complexities.
  11. Jay Bulger's seemingly erratic documentary formally channels Ginger Baker's almost defiant refusal to lead a life that adheres to a linear narrative.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 63 Critic Score
    Sergei Loznitsa occasionally writes his ideas too explicitly in the film's dialogue, though he makes up for this by deftly employing some ironic symbolism elsewhere.
  12. Sergei Loznitsa's documentaries are mainly compilations of archival footage, so it makes sense that his first fiction film is also essentially a compilation, an array of dynamic, aggressive bits rather than one coherent text.
  13. One of Woody Allen's strongest and most pointed films in over a decade despite mildly falling victim to his recent propensity for clunky narrative development, cynicism, and stereotypical characterizations.
  14. Mitra Farahani rescues the doc from becoming a talking-head fest by embracing her creative self as a character and exposing the travails of her own authorship process.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    The pangs of romance, eroticism, anguish, and longing (both for the stolen moments of private passion and for the sense-making schematics of Empire) transcend any period of cinema Tabu may evoke.
  15. The documentary provides a birdsong of perseverance in the face of irrational violence, immense historic anger, and grim, seemingly insurmountable realities.
  16. Throughout, what truly matters to director Jonathan Glazer is articulating through visual and aural enticement the unconscious power of our death drive.
  17. Christopher Nolan's capper of his Batman trilogy is a summer blockbuster of grand inclinations in both form and content.
  18. With The Devil's Backbone, Del Toro pulls an AmenĂ¡bar by dishing out sophisticated war commentary with bone-chilling dread.
  19. Worry and sadness are palpable, but so is wry humor and irony as Song ponders age and mortality with a sensitive eye for emotions and a strong sense of composition.
  20. The Guard is John Michael McDonagh's caustically funny riff on cop and crime films.
  21. George Washington this isn't, but there's enough heft here that the comparison can be tastefully made.
  22. Documentarian and subject, past and present blur together like bleeding watercolors in Raymond De Felitta's gripping memoir.
  23. The film is nothing without the physicality of the performers, as Joss Whedon's script handles the transition of Shakespeare's language to modern day indifferently.
  24. The feminist bent of Robyn's quest nicely shadows the film without ever being stated aloud.
  25. The pleasure in watching the film becomes a linguistic one as Juliette Binoche and Kristen Stewart masterfully sharpen their words and hurl them at each other like projectiles out of a blowpipe.

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