Slant Magazine's Scores

For 2,845 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 33% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 65% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 9.1 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 53
Highest review score: 100 A Brighter Summer Day (1991)
Lowest review score: 0 Cherkess
Score distribution:
2,845 movie reviews
    • 79 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    It's Cristian Mungiu's staging and compositional skill that lends the material its true sense of dawning dread.
  1. It's the rare film to sell sex as something truly tender and life-affirming, and Helen Hunt, in particular, is lovely and poignant.
  2. It's important to talk at length about Pariah's aesthetic because of how it distracts from the emotional truthfulness of the sometimes heartbreaking, by and large gorgeously performed story.
  3. An exposé of how the financial structures that make businesses possible in America seem to conspire against genuine good will and non-self-serving ambition.
  4. The film the tough true story has spawned is as formulaically cheery, didactically "uplifting," and fundamentally false as a Disney sports movie.
  5. Ross McElwee is less anxious of death itself than of finally comprehending the vast faultiness of the life he's lived.
  6. Though his film's feel is pure Iraq and Afghanistan, Fiennes doesn't push those parallels unduly, and his central performances prove clear, nuanced, and incisive.
  7. The poetic pretenses are compounded by a sledgehammer insistence on elusive and irreducible moments as inherently beautiful.
  8. J.C. Chandor's fondness for situational irony is empowered by the spartan efficiency of his method, and that of most of his performers.
  9. There's a comic streak to the film that suggests David Fincher may understand the material as trash, but it's the kind of affectation that only reinforces, rather than dulls, its insults.
  10. Though relentlessly and admirably logical, the movie constantly glosses over the buried human element.
  11. The title of Susan Froemke's documentary is both an expression of aspiration and a statement of achievement.
  12. Israel's fractured psyche is plumbed via narrative splintering in Policeman, Nadav Lapid's compelling drama about his homeland's burgeoning social unrest.
  13. Like the movie itself, every character is a beautiful swirl of contradictions.
  14. It compellingly captures a family wrestling mightily with the riddles and contradictions of a culture that promotes achievement at all costs with little thought as to what that actually means.
  15. This is a fanboy movie, one more engaged with the excitement of possibility than that of reality, and whatever the noxious connotations of that form of film appreciation, this particular project does a pretty fantastic job of stirring up enthusiasm.
  16. Lafleur denies Nicole the angsty treatments given similar characters in films like The Graduate and Frances Ha by refusing to saturate the film with an undergirding sense of charm, where the issues being faced are merely points of spasmodic uncertainty that will erode over time.
  17. Poltergeist's most canny conceit is how it takes the concept of a haunted house—up to that point a gothic, remote icon (you practically had to accept a dare and then drive halfway across the state to ever find yourself in one)—and plops it in the middle of the most mundane of all possible locations: American suburbia.
  18. It never bothers to attempt the one thing we'd expect and hope from a documentary about Ricky Jay: It doesn't try to bamboozle us.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    As is so often the case in Jim Jarmusch's films, simply spending time in the company of his creations proves engrossing.
  19. Lake Bell holds the thing together through sheer charisma, and in fact the foibles of the movie only start to show when she absents herself for extended stretches of time.
  20. This is a summer blockbuster contingent on grand bargains, tactical retreats, and a ferocious, inevitable shock-and-awe campaign.
  21. Steeped in De Palma's glorious violence and sinuous cinematography, but stripped of his tricky sensuality and his anarchic self-reflective wit, The Untouchables boils down to a lot of talk.
  22. The second act shifts the film from a lazy and comfy litany of introductions to a riveting fantasia of pure cinema, wherein Lee paints an oft-wordless picture of nature's harshness and grace, the perfect arena for Pi to have a Christ-like coming of age.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Renate Costa's doc gradually simplifies into an elaborate seesaw between general, journalistic scoopery and unabashedly personal confrontation.
  23. More than just a relationship drama of striking specificity, this is a naked confession about addiction.
  24. The film unfolds in unhurried dramatic terms that come to take on an almost fatalistic force.
  25. Despite crafting a consistently engaging film, the director doesn't present the full scope of Sixto Rodriguez's life.
  26. Ron "Stray Dog" Hall proves to be a welcome antidote to stereotypes about burly, bearded red-state RV dwellers.
  27. A film for those who, whether here or in Israel, believe the law is the beginning, and not the end, of rights discourse.

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