Slant Magazine's Scores

For 2,239 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 36% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 61% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 8.3 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 63
Highest review score: 100 None Shall Pass
Lowest review score: 0 Fireflies
Score distribution:
2,239 music reviews
    • 74 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    People, Hell and Angels offers the clearest sense yet of how Hendrix was preparing an evolution of his own.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The songs may be dense and literary, but they're also immediately potent on a purely visceral level, striking a perfect balance that makes for what's perhaps the best album in a year already thick with great material.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The group's music is far more pointed and focused when she's standing at its center, proving that it's not just the parts (polished and hummable though they may be), but Wasner's transformative presence that ultimately sets Dungeonesse apart from the rest of the '90s-mining pack.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    For its cohesive tone and the ease with which it plumbs the darkest recesses of Marling's consciousness, Once I Was an Eagle is close to a masterpiece, a heavenly composition with just enough hell to keep things from feeling too familiar.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It is hardcore, a visceral distillation of fury that aims to wound.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Warp & Weft is Veirs's most expansive effort yet, with obvious musical and thematic ties to experimental Americana.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The band certainly hasn't left rock behind, but they've found a way to push beyond a sense of exhaustion with the resources that the genre has to offer, while at the same time reflecting on the tenuousness of interpersonal connection in an age of hyper-evolving technology.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The singer's delivery is more pliant than it's ever been, moving from the hushed echo-chamber whispers of "Silver Malcolm" to the fuzzed-out shouts of "Jericho Road." But the real magic is in the melancholy appeal of his daydream, what he calls his "temporary Earth" in "Magic Number," and the persistent possibility of revelation that Jurado catalogues with grim bravado and wry hope.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Her guitar may be her primary tool for shaking up and complicating otherwise strictly defined songwriting, but Clark's voice remains the thing that defines her material, the glittering lynchpin of the glorious, ever-expanding world she's created.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Present Tense possesses a complexity that's not so calculated, focusing on the passage of music rather than layer upon layer of sound. Its 11 synth-drenched tracks are more bare than those on Smother, but they move much more fluidly, their liquiform seduction establishing a contrast with the band's ominous lyrics.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    They work fully as standalone tracks, but feel even more substantial when taken within the overall structure of this beguiling, addictive album, which finally turns this strange duo's intellectual eccentricity into their greatest asset.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It's a rare fulfillment of outsized ambition and a crystallization of Tillman's inimitable narrative verve, however unreliable his narrator may be.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    He's a storyteller with a literary knack for using detail and narrative to draw complex, relatable characters, and his storytelling finesse has never been more evident than it is here.
    • 96 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Tidy this album isn't, but like There's a Riot Goin' On or the distended jams of One Nation Under a Groove, the uncompromising messiness is the point. The focused and fervent anger, politics, cosmic knowledge, and above all unshakable self-doubt is the point too.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    For an album that deals in low stakes, Sometimes I Sit and Think finds Barnett hitting some incredible highs. Without sounding labored, she creates an impeccably honest world rife with humor, self-deprecation, and heartbreak.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    If The Age of Adz harnessed Stevens's limpid melodies to crashing electronica, Carrie & Lowell finds that electronic experimentation sublimated, emerging primarily in the album's timing, which, like a click track, is more precise and mechanical than anything on Stevens's purely folk efforts.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Goldfrapp know how to draw you in and, more importantly, hook you.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Martha has proven to be not just a worthy pupil of such domestic tutelage, but a musician of equal caliber.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Annie the songwriter is breathless and unsure of herself, her voice barely registering above a church-wafer-thin whisper for most of the record.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    An album that, in its best moments, draws comparisons to at-peak Prince and, at its worst, lands in the respectable company of Nikka Costa’s Everybody Got Their Something.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Establishes her as the progenitor of what could be called electro-ethno-pop.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Leavening the melancholy with a tense, literate sense of foreboding, The Back Room flows like an obsidian wave from first song to last.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Best (and nearly perfect) when taken two or three songs at a time, as an entire album, Twin Cinema overstays its welcome. It's simply too much of a good thing.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    While their lyrics do tell compelling stories, Nickel Creek's selling point remains their technical gifts and, again, Why Should The Fire Die? showcases a phenomenal learning curve.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    While there's nothing at all revolutionary in the band's combination of nihilistic lyrics and sunny pop hooks or in their use of dance rhythms behind their guitar power chords, it's nonetheless rare to encounter a major label pop or rock album as start-to-finish good as is Oh No.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    As music that's beautiful simply for the sake of being beautiful, Takk… is an unqualified success.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    For every song that's been improved there's one that's been unnecessarily tooled with.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Z
    Dialing down the reverb and allowing more wide-ranging influences to show through, My Morning Jacket fashions a messy, transitory record that's head-over-heels giddy, curiously experimental, and patently weird in equal measure.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    There have been better albums released in 2005 than Tournament Of Hearts, but it's probably the album most ideally suited to be a left-field commercial success.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The Mouse and the Mask, while it may not be answering life's questions, is an enjoyable and highly original achievement.