Slant Magazine's Scores

For 2,494 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 36% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 61% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 8.1 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 64
Highest review score: 100 Pixel Revolt
Lowest review score: 0 Fireflies
Score distribution:
2494 music reviews
    • 71 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Ta-Dah isn't an unimpeachable triumph from front to back, but it's a hell of a good showing.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Powerful and smart above all else, Enlightenment may just be Hubbard's finest record, and it's certainly the new decade's first essential album.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    D'Angelo may have struck a new gold standard for intellectual R&B, and even recorded a more traditionally cohesive and satisfying album, but Miguel's cocktail of furious angst, pained perplexity, and damaged tenderness is just as relevant, acknowledging the complicated realities of modern sexuality while pushing to expand its horizons.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Will's coup is how it keeps one guessing, and how Barwick keeps from relying on the beautiful yet impersonal sonic washes of her past work. It's the sound an artist, whose mysterious and celebrated process has ironically created theatrical and curated work to this point, finally achieving subtlety.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The band certainly hasn't left rock behind, but they've found a way to push beyond a sense of exhaustion with the resources that the genre has to offer, while at the same time reflecting on the tenuousness of interpersonal connection in an age of hyper-evolving technology.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Three years later, they've given us The Suburbs, a stunningly accomplished album about embattled, often embittered, adulthood by a band that continues to mythologize childhood even as it moves decisively into artistic maturity.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Even in its rare maudlin and melodramatic moments, the album is saved its many precise, stainless sounds: Henry's compassionate, reverb-shaken voice, Bill Frisell's excellent fretwork, a bewitched pump organ, a snare hit that always echoes a bit too long.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The singer's delivery is more pliant than it's ever been, moving from the hushed echo-chamber whispers of "Silver Malcolm" to the fuzzed-out shouts of "Jericho Road." But the real magic is in the melancholy appeal of his daydream, what he calls his "temporary Earth" in "Magic Number," and the persistent possibility of revelation that Jurado catalogues with grim bravado and wry hope.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    A pop debut of disciplined eccentricity and disarming force.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Punchy, ragged, and frenetic, Waterloo To Anywhere surges forward, not-so-subtly aping The Strokes, The Clash, and The Ramones as well as delivering that precise buzz that can only be felt by the young, drunk, and excited.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Jim Noir works brilliantly on an escapist level, even though it rewards more active listening.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Refined attention to detail gives Magnificent City the kind of structural awareness that distinguishes exceptional records from merely great ones.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    A triumph of form, The Order of Time is through and through a completely idiosyncratic take on American roots music, steeped in its tradition but not beholden to it.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The fact that Wolf stands little chance of displacing Rihanna or Adele shouldn't preempt our appreciation of what he's accomplished with this album, which is to shake off his unseemly solipsism and turn out his most catchy and engaging batch of songs in one concise effort.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    What makes Oczy Mlody so enthralling is that the Flaming Lips are ambitious in their exploration of the aftermath of their typical spectacle.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It's something of a miracle, too, that he's managed to wring such beauty and profundity out of the mess of a society he sings about.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The band displays a new level of clear-eyed purpose and here-and-now urgency on American Band. Eloquently plainspoken as ever about the pressing issues we face as a nation, they’ve made an album multiple decades into their career that establishes them as more directly relevant than ever.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Channel Orange is so textured, complex, and mature that Ocean's recent coming out feels like a footnote, rather than the entire story. It's a revelation that only further colors the tales of longing and disappointment found on this impressive album.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It is hardcore, a visceral distillation of fury that aims to wound.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    This empty feeling contributes to the quiet mood of Molina & Johnson, which feels dark and battered yet still gleaming, a compilation that's as evocative as the best work of either of its namesakes.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    A few twists and turns shy of perfection, m b v is the innovation and sonic warmth of My Bloody Valentine rekindled and made anew.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Rather Ripped is probably one of the best records in Sonic Youth's catalog, and definitely one of the best albums of 2006.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Goblin is just as disturbed and twisted as Tyler's debut. And, moreover, it's every bit as outrageously brilliant.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Hot Chip boldly expand and louden up their sound significantly here, while admirably retaining full command of the forms they've already mastered.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Her guitar may be her primary tool for shaking up and complicating otherwise strictly defined songwriting, but Clark's voice remains the thing that defines her material, the glittering lynchpin of the glorious, ever-expanding world she's created.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    This incessant sense of creative movement makes Enemy Mine one of the best albums of the year, the sound of three great musicians forged into a product bigger than themselves.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    A Kind Revolution never feels fragmentary, even though it’s certainly wide-ranging and eclectic. The difference is that Weller really gives his best ideas time to develop here, and his usual frenzied pacing is relaxed a bit, letting the songs fully unfold.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Life's Rich Pageant serves as both a guidepost for how R.E.M. moved in an arena-sized direction and as another extraordinary album in the band's uninterrupted run of true greatness that spanned between Murmur and Automatic for the People.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Immolate Yourself does a lot and does it all well, creating an album that adds explicit punctuation to an already shocking loss.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    They work fully as standalone tracks, but feel even more substantial when taken within the overall structure of this beguiling, addictive album, which finally turns this strange duo's intellectual eccentricity into their greatest asset.