Slant Magazine's Scores

For 585 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 34% higher than the average critic
  • 5% same as the average critic
  • 61% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 2.6 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 63
Highest review score: 100 Fargo: Season 2
Lowest review score: 0 Red Widow: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 377
  2. Negative: 0 out of 377
377 tv reviews
  1. More times than not, this loving obsession with the details of lower-middle-income life makes up for the show's competent but overly plain production design and cinematography. Even more so, the show's symbology is often breathtakingly simple yet resonant.
  2. With the exception of the premiere's ingeniously disorienting first half, which is best left a surprise, the episodes that follow blend this communal melodrama with the flashback structure developed in season one.
  3. The Mags's-money plotline masterfully brings together Boyd's crew, featuring Raylan's farther, Arlo (Raymond J. Barry), Limehouse's camp, an incarcerated Dickie Bennett (Jeremy Davies), the dimwitted Dewey Crowe (Damon Herriman), and Raylan, along with fellow marshal Rachel Brooks (Erica Tazel) in a string of energetic scenes boasting some tremendous acting and increasingly clever dialogue that truly carries the lively spirit of author Elmore Leonard's original work.
  4. The chemistry of every television show should have as rapid a half-life as Breaking Bad, transforming into something new while building off the critical elements of the past.
  5. Masters of Sex remains passingly enjoyable, thanks largely to the cast, including Caitlin FitzGerald, Keke Palmer, and Allison Janney, all of whom help to refocus the series on the crucial role of women in sexual and scientific exploration.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    In some ways, this season of Fargo checks all of the boxes of its precedent seasons: the down-on-his-luck schlub with a surprise knack for crime; the sly yet intoxicating evil force; the righteous, morally sound cop; and the absurd, easily avoidable crime that sets everything into motion. What sets the season apart is its comparatively small cast of players.
  6. It's an honest tearjerker that treats its characters with respect, according them a great sense of wounded, tattered dignity.
  7. Season six is comparatively slow, and obsessive, which is a relief from the convolutions that had grown to characterize Justified. We're allowed to savor those great dialogue exchanges between lovers and antagonists that ultimately define the series.
  8. Like many an episode, it has a way of unexpectedly disarming you with the way man and woman arrive as if by abstract accident at a place of mutual understanding, and the effect is almost cosmic in its good-heartedness.
  9. As with the first season, the organization of each episode is loose, less a tightly plotted chain of events than a constellation of sketches organized around a central premise.... It's that exuberant depiction of female kinship as being inextricably bound to the anarchy of daily living that gives the series its unexpected sweetness.
  10. Weiner still manages to steer clear of the trite "greed is bad" moralizing that sunk films like Oliver Stone's disastrous Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps, as Mad Men still allows the characters' temptations to be authentically seductive.
  11. The Wire is as true as television gets.
  12. Ben's Silicon Valley culture shock, Dan's power struggle with his mercurial co-star, and Jonah's congressional hazing provide new fodder for Veep's beyond the claustrophobic halls of power. After five seasons, the show's limited context began to constrain comedic potential; now its characters are free to wreak havoc in an exponentially larger environment.
  13. For its authentic engagement with despair, Hannibal earns its wrenching nihilism: It's a great, epic vision of American horror.
  14. Regardless of some of its structural weaknesses, The Americans's second season brims with subtle psychological insight into the grinding machinations of Cold War espionage.
  15. For all the talk about the expense of recreating the boardwalk for the show, Atlantic City isn't a character the way it could or should be; most of the action takes place in back alleys and hotel rooms.
  16. [Sherlock's third season] at last settles into its own assured rhythm, simultaneously honoring the swift escapist roots of Doyle's writing while also mounting a heady meditation on friendship and brotherhood.
  17. Overall, it's a convincing enough portrait of the absurdity of modern American politics. But it's exactly this authenticity that makes the contemptuous characters feel aggravatingly one-note in comparison.
  18. Archer is sleekly animated, has a cool retro design, and writing that manages to be both smart and bawdy all at once, but most of all, it has a fantastic voice cast.
  19. The writers have shown that letting the characters drive the story can make a form as tired as the sitcom new again.
  20. Treme puts everything into every scene. The camerawork is rich and the direction squeezes every nuance from the actors. The city's history has been painstakingly researched and effortlessly inserted into the writing. As a result, the moments-or notes-that make up this show are all that much richer, that much livelier.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    This season holds promise, not lacking in the detail that makes the series so enjoyable.
  21. As always, there's no predicting where all of this is headed, but if one last reference to The Divine Comedy is any sign, this season's journey toward the final act of Mad Men's American epic promises to be its most challenging and rewarding.
  22. It's a reliably engrossing hour of television, capable of switching gears from relaxed banter to shocking violence in a split second.
  23. Better Call Saul grows more ironic and tragic with each subsequent episode.
  24. Armisen, Brownstein, and Krisel are effectively crafting a multi-faceted comedy art project, the unfolding of which is both exciting and hysterical to watch.
  25. Ideas became embedded into character and each member of the ensemble was given complex motivations within situations that challenged their natures. As the third season begins, we see that Weiner is committed strongly to going in this same direction with closeted homosexual Salvatore Romano.
  26. Despite the formidable technical mastery applied and the demanding sprawl of the multifaceted narrative, Campion's series has the unmistakable timbre of daring art made naturally.
  27. On a whole, the new season of Friday Night Lights manages to retain its depth and heart-wrenching warmth despite a sea change in its structure and characters.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Though Lena Dunham's characters are far more sympathetic, she takes pains to debase them, and makes them both funnier and more recognizably human in the process.

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