Slant Magazine's Scores

For 601 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 35% higher than the average critic
  • 5% same as the average critic
  • 60% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 2.5 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 63
Highest review score: 100 Spartacus: Vengeance: Season 1
Lowest review score: 0 Red Widow: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 390
  2. Negative: 0 out of 390
390 tv reviews
    • 87 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Though Lena Dunham's characters are far more sympathetic, she takes pains to debase them, and makes them both funnier and more recognizably human in the process.
  1. Broad City exudes a warm empathy, however selective, that distinguishes it from the more openly misanthropic Seinfeld.
  2. At its wildest moments, the series feels as frighteningly nervy and furious in its delivery and intent as prime David Lynch. More times than not, however, it defers to an earnest, rote view of bad religion, only marginally enlivened by the appearance of Shea Whigham as a big-tent preacher.
  3. In addition to embarking on a substantive season-long story arc, these new episodes also tread fresh emotional territory.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    For all its faults, from some off-kilter performances and sometimes clumsy articulations of overarching themes, Orange Is the New Black feels as sublime as ever for so intuitively recognizing that even the little joys that prison life can bring to an inmate are deceptive, as they too hinge on a relinquishing of power.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Even at its most desultory, when the show is happily proceeding through legal drama conventions or even high-concept schlock, the execution, from the writing to the acting, resonates with virtuosic polish.
  4. Ultimately, what a series like this aims to do is to pay homage to the marines who sacrificed their lives. The Pacific succeeds at that task, asking its audience to imagine what those battles must have been like from the ground level, and for that alone, it's worth watching. But The Pacific fails by trying to wrest big emotional moments from its already compelling narrative.
  5. The amiable, unlikely empathy and neuroses that separate the members of the Pied Piper family from the pack are the same elements that give this gleefully sardonic comedy its distinct, bittersweet tone.
  6. Most of the episodes so far have ended with a simulacrum of a group hug, an acknowledgement that, even though they don't always get along, this family loves one another. So far, these moments have worked on the show, but the formula could get tired.
  7. It's a funny episode, boisterously so in parts, but it's difficult to shake the feeling that we've seen this before. After eight seasons, it's started to become too easy to spot Curb Your Enthusiasm's patented ironic twists and callback gags coming a mile away.
  8. Charlie (Charlie Day), Mac (Rob McElhenney), Dennis (Glenn Howerton), Dee (Kaitlin Olson), and Frank (Danny DeVito) are as magnetically dysfunctional as ever, and their neurotic efforts to scheme their way to happiness, fame, and fortune continue to coincide with skewed views on a variety of real-world issues that blend well with the show's onslaught of crude, scattershot humor.
  9. Where Mad Men branches out its individual narratives in a variety of ways, letting its characters deal with problems not related to the workplace, Masters of Sex seems rigidly anchored to its basic premise.
  10. Fargo commands one's attention in the tradition of a pretty good yet ultimately impersonal beach read, but it offers an unqualified triumph in its reworking of Marge Gunderson, the character Frances McDormand played in the film.
  11. Here and elsewhere, the series attests with great compassion to the revitalizing effects of living in a place where, while more homogeneous than it once was, pockets of resistance remain--and where people are nothing if not alive to the power of difference.
  12. Soderbergh has found a brand new canvas to test out visual ideas and off-kilter storytelling devices, and The Knick‘s intoxicating second season proves to be a dazzlingly detailed and vibrantly visual mural of his obsessions, bringing on a sort of imagistic high that would count as the famed filmmaker’s most obvious addiction.
  13. The potential emotional satisfaction of this melodrama, which is insultingly pat to begin with, is hampered by the seemingly endless scenes of council meetings that Simon characteristically loves, which are contextually diluted by the stock dialogue and cartoon acting that surrounds them.
  14. The show's writing is as economic and poetically parred. Each moment is compact, leading to the next with unpredictable, behaviorally astute precision.
  15. If last season was The Empire Strikes Back, though, season three is slightly more Revenge of the Sith than Return of the Jedi.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Milch has a keen eye for his actors' untapped resources--he doesn't so much cast against physical types as he does psychological ones--and this is what makes Deadwood's expansive ensemble so continually exciting to watch.
  16. While plenty of Nashville is compelling, detailed, and beautifully acted, plenty of it feels boilerplate.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    As a result, what began as a quasi-voyeuristic family drama about polygamists trying to find a place for themselves as suburban, middle-class American citizens has transformed into an allegory of the growing place of libertarianism in mainstream politics.
  17. Downton Abbey remains an extremely reliable television show. The appeal of the series is its pastness, its portrait of a completely foreign culture from a land before time.
  18. HBO's The Normal Heart is a boldly corporeal expression of gay political consciousness.
  19. Though season four sees it treading into heavy waters, Broad City does so without shoving a woke badge in our faces.
  20. This is farce with a heart, shot through with unlikely moments of grace and warmed by an aura of bemused acceptance.
  21. That the episode feels somewhat uneventful only belies the intriguing, subtle shifts that have taken place since last season.
  22. If the insights into modern existence on Portlandia never seem quite as profound as those on Louie, the series continues to brandish a view of gender that's almost casually radical.
  23. As Jimmy and Gretchen have turned coupling into an unending routine of cataclysm and make-up sex, and their uncoupling is darkly funny, poignant, and more explosive as anything that came before.
  24. Going Clear distinguishes itself by tying that material into a coherent framework that provides a concise, scholarly context within which Scientology can be understood as a real system of beliefs, with roots in a specific time and place.
  25. The Killing is both new and old, on-trend and deeply unfashionable. But, throughout the first couple of episodes, we watch as the show masterfully transforms its anxiety of influence into a propulsive anxiety.

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