Slant Magazine's Scores

For 604 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 35% higher than the average critic
  • 5% same as the average critic
  • 60% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 2.6 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 63
Highest review score: 100 Mad Men: Season 3
Lowest review score: 0 Red Widow: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 391
  2. Negative: 0 out of 391
391 tv reviews
  1. HBO's The Normal Heart is a boldly corporeal expression of gay political consciousness.
  2. As always, there's no predicting where all of this is headed, but if one last reference to The Divine Comedy is any sign, this season's journey toward the final act of Mad Men's American epic promises to be its most challenging and rewarding.
  3. For every Mrs. Patmore, the cook who wants nothing more than to stay in service the remainder of her life, there is a housemaid such as Gwen (Rose Leslie), who dreams of becoming a secretary in a modern office. It's these dichotomies, and the way they exist within both the Abbey itself (half the rooms have electricity and half don't) and its multifaceted inhabitants that make Downton Abbey not only the best soap opera currently on television, but one of the most relevant as well.
  4. For all the ambition and exaggeration of these episodes, however, it's the subtle “Mac & Dennis Move to the Suburbs” that best summarizes Sunny's approach to its “golden” years. A warm, inviting suburban atmosphere has long been a staple of American sitcoms, and Sunny instantly corrupts it.
  5. The turmoil of such [relationship] arrangements, the anxiety and surprising limitations of being personally unbound by societal norms, has been a key part of Louie's inimitable perspective since its inception; here this anxiousness stirs up new perspectives on Louie's ability to forgive and his unique style of courting.
  6. Like the excellent fourth season of Homeland, season five suggests a politically wise and deeply skeptical update of John le Carré's very best spy-centric work, seeing the fury, confusion, and accepted hypocrisy of international diplomacy with the same clarity as the lies and duplicitous acts the show's characters indulge in on a regular basis.
  7. Empire coasts with the chutzpah of a series that knows exactly what it wants to say and how to say it, leaving viewers no quarter except to pick their jaws up off the floor between commercial breaks.
  8. What continues to impress is the show’s consistently striking attention to detail. The various storylines are elegantly structured, layered over one another to create the sensation of an image slowly coming into focus.
  9. Behind the Candelabra is powerful, funny, and emotionally rigorous, and though it might act as a fiery and forceful resignation, in conjunction with Side Effects, it also serves as an uncommonly heartfelt Dear John letter.
  10. Showing us the long-term impact of the attack on the lives of these characters, whose deep-seated motivations and fears have gradually been revealed to us over the last two seasons, allows Homeland to transcend its tendencies toward the hyperbolic and gives us a reason to suspend our disbelief.
  11. Rather than waiting for a future payoff, Fringe is cashing in with every episode, showing us the escalating war between worlds-and with likeable characters and compelling cases to boot. Ironically, it's by branching out in two different directions that the show has become, more than ever, the centerpiece of a hypercompetitive Thursday night lineup.
  12. The Mags's-money plotline masterfully brings together Boyd's crew, featuring Raylan's farther, Arlo (Raymond J. Barry), Limehouse's camp, an incarcerated Dickie Bennett (Jeremy Davies), the dimwitted Dewey Crowe (Damon Herriman), and Raylan, along with fellow marshal Rachel Brooks (Erica Tazel) in a string of energetic scenes boasting some tremendous acting and increasingly clever dialogue that truly carries the lively spirit of author Elmore Leonard's original work.
  13. As with the first season, the organization of each episode is loose, less a tightly plotted chain of events than a constellation of sketches organized around a central premise.... It's that exuberant depiction of female kinship as being inextricably bound to the anarchy of daily living that gives the series its unexpected sweetness.
  14. The series has always been prone to creative experimentation, but it's never been as pervasive, or as successful, as it is here.
  15. Character, not concept, drives BrainDead. The Kings have always stacked their deck with talented, scene-stealing stage actors, and that serves both the bombastic, egoistic orators of D.C. and the everyday eccentrics.
  16. Louie is smart, cinematic, and bitterly honest, constantly dancing between revelatory moments and hysterical bursts of humor that are both surprising and touching.
  17. By casting Rick's protagonist status into question, showrunner Scott Gimple has opened The Walking Dead to new possibilities--both in its narrative and philosophical foundations--and is successfully crafting a rare series of rising caliber and still-widening potential deep into its run.
  18. It's arresting and criminally entertaining.
  19. The unforeseeable effects and ostensible curse of murdering have always proved key to the show's tension, and as the story continues to build a kinetic rhythm and streamline the drama, the thunderous chaos stirred up by each life taken resonates all the more loudly.
  20. Enoch clearly loves the drink, and enjoys the bad work he does, and the final season of Boardwalk Empire suggests that no matter what cloaking his ilk partially hid under, it's nothing compared to the whitewashing that's about to come.
  21. Asking viewers to simply look his characters in the eye, Milch has created an infuriatingly but genuinely moving drama.
  22. [Sherlock's third season] at last settles into its own assured rhythm, simultaneously honoring the swift escapist roots of Doyle's writing while also mounting a heady meditation on friendship and brotherhood.
  23. The chemistry of every television show should have as rapid a half-life as Breaking Bad, transforming into something new while building off the critical elements of the past.
  24. [Futurama has] eccentric yet oddly sympathetic characters, scores of clever pop-culture homages, and a unique visual aesthetic that isn't afraid to experiment with a variety of styles both vintage and modern.
  25. The dangerously entertaining Legion is a volatile mix of complete chaos and complete control.
  26. Hannibal is richer and more ambiguous than prior Harris adaptations; it's an exploration of social decay that's rife with literal and figurative cancers eating everyone alive from the ground up.
  27. Knowing but not pretentious, snarky but not sneering, Portlandia succeeds both as farce and as faithful representation of a population for whom the dream--of the '90s or anything else, for that matter--is still alive.
  28. Most of the episodes so far have ended with a simulacrum of a group hug, an acknowledgement that, even though they don't always get along, this family loves one another. So far, these moments have worked on the show, but the formula could get tired.
  29. On a whole, the new season of Friday Night Lights manages to retain its depth and heart-wrenching warmth despite a sea change in its structure and characters.
  30. Even with the hasty resolution of some storylines, the season's last few episodes still end up feeling overstuffed. They never, however, feel aimless.

Top Trailers