Slant Magazine's Scores

For 2,630 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 33% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 65% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 9 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 53
Highest review score: 100 Hard to Be a God
Lowest review score: 0 Star Wars: Episode I - The Phantom Menace
Score distribution:
2,630 movie reviews
  1. Aarón Fernández captures one of the most heartening elements of sex: that it doesn't always oblige our rules or expectations.
  2. Freed from the burden of starting anew, the film restores the Muppets' rightful place as stars of their own show.
  3. More focused on emotion than adventure, it teases out the possibilities and perils of time travel without embroiling itself in the confusion inherent to the subject.
  4. The camera is at its most effective when it seems dumbfounded at what it's indexing.
  5. The narrative works through the many contradictions brewing inside its main character in the wake of his personal actualization without ever feeling like a dramatic checklist.
  6. The film has a shambling charm that actively disputes an unspoken notion that a documentary must be well-structured in order to effectively land its points.
  7. Julia Murat shows a fine grasp of form, letting her technique reflect the elements and moods of her story.
  8. Markus Imhoof's film reveals itself as a curious, audacious mix of personal essay film and nature documentary.
  9. The overall experience is entirely immersive, thanks not only to the filmmakers' handheld camera, but also to the illusory nature of the staging.
  10. These myriad impressions never quite add up to anything coherent by the end, but perhaps the incoherence is precisely the point.
  11. O'Conner continues to exhibit a deft knack for melding interpersonal drama with athletic competition in ways that, despite his tales' clichés, earn their melodramatic manipulations through genuine empathy for characters' plights.
  12. A yuletide fable that boasts Aardman Animation's peerless mix of whip-smart comedy and cheery heart.
  13. The film lays bare that the franchise's most radical asset is also its most conservative: an overriding emphasis on, above all else, the on-screen family.
  14. Not only does its incredibly loose aesthetic challenge the traditionally controlled and slick conventions of the cop genre, it adds a certain visceral haziness that compliments Brown's own professional and personal immorality.
  15. The beloved gang's sweet reunion will melt nostalgic adults into laughter and tears, and maybe kids won't mind drippy new Muppet Walter so much.
  16. It thrills in seeing dumb people getting their due in hyper-stylized displays of violence, and yet it never feels contemptuous of them.
  17. The Lorax is a modest gem, failing to significantly enhance its source material's ideas but still delivering a zany, rollicking, multi-character version of Seuss's environmental cautionary tale.
  18. Chiemi Karasawa's documentary is remarkable for its candor, but it's a brutal honesty that Elaine Stritch herself gladly offers.
  19. The film has an exhilarating tossed-off quality that characterized many of the most entertaining works of the French New Wave.
  20. While Michael Glawogger does make overtures in the wrong directions, he usually seems to know where to steer his material.
  21. An honest and breezily melancholic film, thoroughly clear-sighted in its intentions and ideas and bravely committed to the emotional rigors of its central relationship.
  22. The songs performed here function as the creative end point of emotional trauma, revealing pain gradually transfigured into art.
  23. For all its references to the show's history, the film never panders. It's an evolution of the core concept as opposed to a nostalgia-tinged reproduction, and is all the better for it.
  24. Lukas Moodysson's film allows its trio of girls to express themselves through gender, certainly, but not undermine their desire to be heard as artists first.
  25. Julia Ivanova, a Canadian filmmaker, doesn't judge Olga; she refuses to see her through the eyes of a presumably better-off first-world citizen.
  26. Jay Bulger's seemingly erratic documentary formally channels Ginger Baker's almost defiant refusal to lead a life that adheres to a linear narrative.
  27. Both keenly calculated and flowing with offbeat, naturalistic detail, Hanif Kureishi's jewel of a script reflects his sensibilities as a playwright.
  28. While We the Party can be insensitive, or blind, to the misogyny and homophobia of the general culture (the token gay teen is a finger-snapping, head-bobbing fashionista), it takes the issues of race and class quite seriously.
  29. A righteously outraged documentary targeting the "warm and fuzzy" iconography of the breast cancer fundraising bureaucracy and its camouflage of corporate priorities.
  30. What this movie finally boils down to is a deceptively simple tale of two brothers, and of being one's brother's keeper, and of seeking justice on the crudest of fronts.

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