Slant Magazine's Scores

For 456 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 34% higher than the average critic
  • 5% same as the average critic
  • 61% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 2.7 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 62
Highest review score: 100 Mad Men: Season 3
Lowest review score: 0 Zero Hour: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 295
  2. Negative: 0 out of 295
295 tv reviews
  1. Breaking Bad continues at the same disciplined, regimented pace, fussing over small details and picking at new threads, even with the end looming.
    • 98 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    David Simon and his writers... aren't out to change the world; the slippery slope of civilization is already in place on The Wire and Simon is just out to document how each and every person survives. Or doesn't, as this season quite devastatingly proves.
  2. This is one of the rarest finds on television: a show where cast and character are so perfectly matched by a creator who understands exactly what journey he wants take his audience on.
  3. That Enlightened's propagandist and activist message is tinged with irony only makes it more perfectly tooled to our times.
  4. In its fourth season, Game of Thrones finally strides with the purpose and fearlessness of a great battle-tested behemoth through the sprawling, violent landscapes of Westeros.
  5. There's quite a bit going on underneath the show's deceptively raw, on-the-fly simplicity. It's also often a hilarious, exhilaratingly dangerous mixture of the broad, macabre, and political.
  6. Even if the radiant humor occasionally tends a bit toward the local, as in the brilliant season opening involving members of the DSNY, the point of view is so effortlessly relatable in its humble assertions.
  7. Only by tuning in on Sundays will we discover if the tone of upheaval herein will define season four; regardless, Mad Men continues to hit its stride most indelibly while rendering the off-kilter uneasiness of transition.
  8. Working with a uniformly subtle and expressive cast of players, the writers sneak in small, unassuming truths about family life and the benefits of modulated pride.
  9. The turmoil of such [relationship] arrangements, the anxiety and surprising limitations of being personally unbound by societal norms, has been a key part of Louie's inimitable perspective since its inception; here this anxiousness stirs up new perspectives on Louie's ability to forgive and his unique style of courting.
  10. The unforeseeable effects and ostensible curse of murdering have always proved key to the show's tension, and as the story continues to build a kinetic rhythm and streamline the drama, the thunderous chaos stirred up by each life taken resonates all the more loudly.
  11. Justified's rich vein of gallows humor, convincing sense of place, and twisty hillbilly-noir narratives are all selling points, but it's Olyphant's devilish grin that seals the deal.
  12. For every Mrs. Patmore, the cook who wants nothing more than to stay in service the remainder of her life, there is a housemaid such as Gwen (Rose Leslie), who dreams of becoming a secretary in a modern office. It's these dichotomies, and the way they exist within both the Abbey itself (half the rooms have electricity and half don't) and its multifaceted inhabitants that make Downton Abbey not only the best soap opera currently on television, but one of the most relevant as well.
  13. Justified is the strongest, liveliest, and most tonally accurate adaptation of the writer's work to date, and the latest season bracingly suggests that isn't likely to change anytime soon.
  14. Louie is smart, cinematic, and bitterly honest, constantly dancing between revelatory moments and hysterical bursts of humor that are both surprising and touching.
  15. The series reserves its most blistering humor for the universal narcissism on display, always distracting from the real work at hand. For all the brilliant, tossed-off insults and uniformly excellent performances, including Patton Oswalt as a "hands-on" aide to the vice president, the season's through line is its treatment of politics as a con artist's medium.
  16. The Mags's-money plotline masterfully brings together Boyd's crew, featuring Raylan's farther, Arlo (Raymond J. Barry), Limehouse's camp, an incarcerated Dickie Bennett (Jeremy Davies), the dimwitted Dewey Crowe (Damon Herriman), and Raylan, along with fellow marshal Rachel Brooks (Erica Tazel) in a string of energetic scenes boasting some tremendous acting and increasingly clever dialogue that truly carries the lively spirit of author Elmore Leonard's original work.
  17. The chemistry of every television show should have as rapid a half-life as Breaking Bad, transforming into something new while building off the critical elements of the past.
  18. It's an honest tearjerker that treats its characters with respect, according them a great sense of wounded, tattered dignity.
  19. Season six is comparatively slow, and obsessive, which is a relief from the convolutions that had grown to characterize Justified. We're allowed to savor those great dialogue exchanges between lovers and antagonists that ultimately define the series.
  20. As with the first season, the organization of each episode is loose, less a tightly plotted chain of events than a constellation of sketches organized around a central premise.... It's that exuberant depiction of female kinship as being inextricably bound to the anarchy of daily living that gives the series its unexpected sweetness.
  21. The Wire is as true as television gets.
  22. For its authentic engagement with despair, Hannibal earns its wrenching nihilism: It's a great, epic vision of American horror.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    [Sherlock's third season] at last settles into its own assured rhythm, simultaneously honoring the swift escapist roots of Doyle's writing while also mounting a heady meditation on friendship and brotherhood.
  23. Archer is sleekly animated, has a cool retro design, and writing that manages to be both smart and bawdy all at once, but most of all, it has a fantastic voice cast.
  24. The writers have shown that letting the characters drive the story can make a form as tired as the sitcom new again.
  25. Treme puts everything into every scene. The camerawork is rich and the direction squeezes every nuance from the actors. The city's history has been painstakingly researched and effortlessly inserted into the writing. As a result, the moments-or notes-that make up this show are all that much richer, that much livelier.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    This season holds promise, not lacking in the detail that makes the series so enjoyable.
  26. As always, there's no predicting where all of this is headed, but if one last reference to The Divine Comedy is any sign, this season's journey toward the final act of Mad Men's American epic promises to be its most challenging and rewarding.
  27. Armisen, Brownstein, and Krisel are effectively crafting a multi-faceted comedy art project, the unfolding of which is both exciting and hysterical to watch.

Top Trailers