Slant Magazine's Scores

For 1,975 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 32% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 65% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 9.1 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 52
Highest review score: 100 Tomboy
Lowest review score: 0 Mother's Day
Score distribution:
1,975 movie reviews
    • 74 Metascore
    • 63 Critic Score
    Keith Miller doesn't always trust the fluency of his visual language, occasionally forcing a point that's already being captured.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Leaves us moved by poignant scenes of victims' shattered lives, but, for reasons unclear, keeps the bullies themselves largely out of our reach.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 63 Critic Score
    Pooh's moral triumph isn't all that weighty, but it's almost existentially profound to see the silly old bear forgo honey a little while longer because of someone else's needs.
  1. What Omar best portrays are the limitations that result from having an occupation, and the fight to overthrow it, dominate a person's entire life.
  2. Lacking both spiritual and narrative spark, Vera Farmiga's directorial debut suffers from her flat performance and a moribund, weirdly sex-joke-spiked narrative.
  3. The film's empowering themes of feminine strengths and bonds eventually flourish in novel fashion.
  4. Its looseness adequately portrays Plimpton as an inwardly conflicted figure, but it fails to make much of a case for his legacy outside of The Paris Review's still-noticeable brand.
  5. The film's highly calculated beauty suffocates rather than elevates the story's emotional underpinnings.
  6. It's the rare film that should not introduce new story elements or characters past its first act. In Darkness, a garbage movie applying for unlimited credit on the most meager collateral, is that film.
  7. Underlying the occasionally harrowing, consistently mournful tone is a philosophy that, more than being explicitly anti-capital punishment, puts both family ties and the social contract at the center of people's self-worth.
  8. The film is most interesting as an articulation of how its main character's initial status as an emblem of inter-religious understanding quickly dissolves following a suicide bombing.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 25 Critic Score
    It would be inaccurate to call Happy People: A Year in the Taiga the newest Werner Herzog film.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Less old-fashioned than demure and passé, evoking the visual style and rhythms of a 1990s made-for-TV movie rather than a daring, revisionist independent feature.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 63 Critic Score
    It works as a reminder of the important interactiveness of the performing arts, of actors evoking the drama, action, and emotion that computers and machines cannot.
  9. Moussa Touré's worldview, like Ousmane Sembene's, is characterized by the feeling that, at the end of the day, some degree of loss or defeat is inevitable.
  10. Possibly year's most immaculate-looking drivel, a prismatically shot whodunit abundant in red herrings, but lacking in moral contemplation.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    As great and intimate as Live at Massey Hall 1971 may be, it's not as transportive as this filming of a Neil Young performance at the venue 30 years later.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Minimalist in its aesthetics and soundtrack, quiet and deliberate in its plot, but nonetheless familiar--endearing and a vital addition to the small but growing Tibetan cinema.
  11. The film works as a charming aesthetic exercise with its jerky camera and inadvertent cuts, as a contemplation on intergenerational female bonding.
  12. Director Shaul Schwarz, sans judgment, presents us with two men who epitomize how accepted and engrained narco culture has become in Mexico.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 63 Critic Score
    There are grudges held amid all the good will, an intention of the Hypnotic Brass Ensemble to do things on their terms, and those terms stem directly from their upbringing.
  13. The Mission: Impossible franchise seems almost crudely mercenary in its formula for success.
  14. It runs a complicated bait and switch on its audience, passing ostensible exploitation fodder through a high-toned prestige filter.
  15. The film scores all of its thematic points early, commenting intriguingly, if ultimately rather obviously, on the demands of Japanese patriarchy.
  16. Both keenly calculated and flowing with offbeat, naturalistic detail, Hanif Kureishi's jewel of a script reflects his sensibilities as a playwright.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Ben Wheatley's film is a reckless combination of period piece, war drama, broad comedy, psychedelic fever dream, and occult horror-scape.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The director glosses over rather than digs deep into such interesting aspects as the varied opinions of the men under Khodorkovsky who've had to flee the country because of him.
  17. It takes cojones for a filmmaker to chase Fassbinder's ghost, but it takes heart and talent to damn near catch up with it.
  18. If the film covers well-tread territory (a morally bankrupt player trying to prolong his own influence), it does so with pinpoint control of mood and theme.
  19. It foists its own retelling of Angela Davis's story over any contemplation of her politics, effectively neutering their power as it could apply to today in the hands of a proper film essayist.

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