Slant Magazine's Scores

For 2,262 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 32% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 65% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 9.5 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 52
Highest review score: 100 Laurence Anyways
Lowest review score: 0 Last Will and Embezzlement
Score distribution:
2,262 movie reviews
  1. Although far from the worst offender in Disney's canon, The Lion King is nevertheless host to many of the less savory qualities common to the studio's output.
  2. Ira Sachs's push for heartrending poetry makes it clear that the film is putting too fine a gloss on the acute pains of one small tragedy.
  3. The Frankensteinian rebellion of orcas against their corporate captors turns this doc into a sort of showbiz horror film.
  4. There's great potential for the kind of issues that are taken on, but nothing is resolved, and the biggest questions, of guilt and shame, the gulf of understanding between the first world and the third, remain unengaged.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    The decentralized narrative benefits from the film's original conception as a miniseries, with plenty of time to draw us into the morass that was the communist state.
  5. To drive home the pathos of Nim's mistreatment, James Marsh frequently makes questionable use of the creature's apparent similarity to human beings, trading complex analysis for easy sentiment.
  6. I Killed My Mother is a film best heard than seen, as the earnest, nimble scrubbiness of Dolan's screenplay is ill-served by his conceited visuals, an aesthetic mode that feels insecurely borrowed from perfume commercials and the work of Jean-Luc Godard and Wong Kar-Wai.
  7. Even if Hayao Miyazaki's career is complete, a work like this serves to remind us of the shining beacons he's left behind him, the testaments to pursuing beauty in the face of so much ugliness, themselves lasting reminders of the quiet rewards of determination.
  8. This joyous documentary leaves us wanting to immediately seek out the incredible, sometimes unfamiliar music we've just heard.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Go after Pina and you're going to have to go through a mob of modern-dance zealots first.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Scorsese's affection for cinema is, of course, no surprise, and Hugo doesn't shy away from stumping for the cause of his Film Foundation; which isn't to say it's a vanity project, at least not any more than any film with a budget in the nine figures is.
  9. It works too hard to keep matters on an even, we're-all-more-alike-than-different keel, which is just one part of its chief problem of forcefully conveying information and intent.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    With its compelling and original approach to its romance narrative, coupled with Paulina GarcĂ­a's nuanced and intuitive performance, the film delicately balances an entire octave of emotions.
  10. The geometry of human relationships is the main theme of Hong Sang-soo's The Day He Arrives.
  11. The ear for language is paired with an eye for the landscape, and the film finds beauty even in such a seemingly dreary, economically depressed community.
  12. What first feels like a neurotic avoidance of Sol LeWitt the man instead becomes a kind of mirage of his life, as though he managed to evaporate into his body of work.
  13. The series is both a testimonial to the vagaries of chance and an endlessly cyclical study into the implications of being studied.
  14. Accusation is the rhetoric of outrage, and Arnon Goldfinger can't bring himself to experience even conservative anger, regardless of its appropriateness.
  15. The documentary is committed not to some pseudo-factual documentary tradition, but to a more engaging realist poesis.
  16. Funny, moving, honest, and occasionally inspiring, but as a portrait of a talent emerging from the shadow of a more public talent, the scale of the shadow is curiously omitted.
  17. A serviceable primer on the digital-celluloid divide in commercial cinema, if a bit unwieldy in scope and in danger of being made obsolete by the next version of the RED camera.
  18. The filmmakers use a wide range of cinematic techniques to convey the tenuous environment in which their subjects find themselves.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    In essentially offering up The Twelfth Night as a hazy Shakespearean mash-up, Viola isn't so much deeply disrespecting notions of ownership, authorship, etc., as charitably redefining them.
  19. Its director's romantic sensibilities wed to Terrence Rattigan's 60-year-old play, this period drama is buoyed by Rachel Weisz's poignant embodiment of a bourgeois wife seeking erotic autonomy.
  20. Shirley Clarke's portraiture eschews cohesive biography and often spirals off into lyrical dissonance.
  21. El Velador doesn't pass judgment or manipulate emotionally, instead choosing simply to consider the arduousness of survival in a land wracked by slaughter.
  22. There's tremendous dramatic value to the aching and sometimes devastating scenes that home in on these kids' private torments.
  23. All told, there's an ageless warmth to The LEGO Movie akin to that of the LEGO brand itself.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Noah Baumbach's film feels like too perfect a portrait of quarter-life malady, down to the rushed redemptive endnotes and Greta Gerwig's idealized heroine.
  24. An acutely felt, altogether devastating family drama as intimate and affecting as it is sprawling and untamed.

Top Trailers