Slant Magazine's Scores

For 2,151 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 32% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 66% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 9.7 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 52
Highest review score: 100 Wake in Fright (1971)
Lowest review score: 0 The Cup
Score distribution:
2,151 movie reviews
    • 52 Metascore
    • 38 Critic Score
    The adventitious use of loud and strange blasts of music may theoretically make sense to heighten the film's creepiness, but here, like everything else, they don't exactly make a perfect fit and serve more as the final nail in the coffin for the film's lack of tonal cohesion.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Illustrates the problem of class mobility with a dark, troubling premise that holds a harsh light up to our own assumptions and expectations.
  1. Essentially a live-action anime, it sweats rivulets of Tarantino-era digital anxiety from all pores--every kick, punch, pan, and zoom exaggerated for maximum impact.
  2. The director avoids all manner of stylistics, opting instead for the formulaic doc trifecta of first-person interviews, archival material, and news footage.
  3. A heartfelt retro flashback littered with pop-culture iconography and much slang, it focuses on the importance of friendship and loyalty rather than social standing.
  4. You know a film isn't going to be considered high art when the guy to your left at the press screening is a reporter from Extra and the guy to your right lets out a loud "That's awesome, man" after each scene.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 38 Critic Score
    Any potential flights of invention or creativity are subordinate to the plain and emphatic delivery of life lessons.
  5. The women of the film certainly deserve better, as they're often relegated to the role of victim, harmed or murdered simply to propel the plot along.
  6. Christopher Felver is too reverent to properly convey the invigoratingly profane, angry messiness of the sense of community that Lawrence Ferlinghetti and his peers too briefly brought to life.
  7. George Clooney's film boils a big, messy maelstrom of theft and uncertainty down to a digestible, faintly appetizing mush.
  8. And that's the thing with Epic: It's something close to an animated masterpiece, provided it's watched on mute.
  9. First thing to get out of the way: No, David M. Rosenthal's third feature, Janie Jones, has nothing to do with the famous song by the same name that opens the Clash's self-titled 1977 debut album. Perhaps that might have made this film far more interesting film it is.
  10. It'd be unwise to dismiss Safe House as merely a clone of Tony Scott's manically inclined vision.
  11. P. David Ebersole so busy flitters from one point of interest to another that Hit So Hard never coheres into anything other than a collection of rock-star clichés.
  12. Tina Gordon Chism's film collapses into a series of clumsy improvisatory sketches, tied up in cheap, risibly sentimental catharsis.
  13. Every shot is painstakingly thought out, but less emphasis is placed on the human face than on the surfaces that reflect it and the objects that obscure it, and the overall effect is close to that of fetish art.
  14. A better film would have had the gumption to maintain the poetic bleakness, rather than steer toward what ultimately feels like safe compromise.
  15. Ultimately the film is, like the Faux News programming it caricatures at face value, a deck-stacking simulation of a dialogue it isn't even remotely interested in opening.
  16. The interpolations of "heavenly" sequences of Jeremy Lin playing basketball against CGI backdrops offer a hokey visual analogue for the intersection of faith and sports in his life.
  17. Beautiful Creatures basically spits in the face of a legacy of literature founded on feelings of exclusion and social alienation.
  18. Matthias Hoene allows the cockney swears to flow as deliriously as the truly convincing blood splatter, offering a few unexpected gut-busters along the way.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Director Aimee Lagos seems to be at odds with her own film, like a well-meaning but controlling parent hell-bent on choosing a child's college, major, and fraternity for them.
  19. Throughout, it becomes difficult to know whether we're meant to empathize with these characters or laugh at them.
  20. Scott Stewart's Dark Skies is the definitive horror film for the Tea Party era.
  21. Lionizing a world-class architect without tipping into hagiography, this documentary performs a graceful cinematic dance around his works.
  22. Sassy Pants has a slightly ludic atmosphere akin to another tale of teen alienation, Dear Lemon Lima, but it unfolds like a fable in which only Bethany doesn't feel like a canned caricature.
  23. The film is ultimately more concerned with Caveh Zahedi's attempts to pursue a variety of dull passing fancies than with any larger agenda.
  24. This window into the world of youthful competition almost entirely disposes of social awareness in favor of routine drama.
  25. Greatly cognizant of the revenge genre's penchant for hypocritical demagoguery, director Arnaud des Pallières unsettles the audience's usual feelings of vicarious blood lust.
  26. Heist, swindle, and other like-minded genre films thrive or flounder on the mechanics of their story's dangerously elaborate scheme, a fact ably proven by Contraband, a tale of high-seas smuggling without a clever thought in its leaden, derivative head.

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