Slant Magazine's Scores

For 2,794 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 33% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 65% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 9.1 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 53
Highest review score: 100 Timbuktu
Lowest review score: 0 33 Postcards
Score distribution:
2,794 movie reviews
  1. A phony collection of storytelling clichés held under the banner of archetype and lent a modicum of weight by the splendor of the landscape.
  2. Wholly uninterested in puffing up his subjects into an iconic rock outfit on a par with their idols Led Zeppelin and the Who, Crowe instead merely tells their story free from the constraints of rise-fall-rise clichés.
  3. While his classic hyperbolic visual style is back in force, Stone can't bother to muster any of his usual righteous anger, instead mischanneling his discontent into a kind of zen acceptance of these perpetually tiresome main characters.
  4. The filmmakers' very particular sense of lighting and framing, though handsome, often exudes a formality that perpetually stifles the story's sense of spontaneity.
  5. Lee Isaac Chung's film exudes a wonderful sense of originality, a daring and organic playfulness rarely found in American indie cinema.
  6. It's hard to say which is worse: the unfunny caricatures or the indulgent soul-searching.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    By turning the idea of progress on its head, the nimble Surviving Progress exquisitely presents to us the possibility that humankind's achievements may cause its downfall.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 38 Critic Score
    The documentary can at times feel like you're wasting your time on a subject you might wish you had only accidentally crossed paths with briefly on Wikipedia.
  7. The modern-day sections with Mariel Hemingway, while detailing the redemptive promise of the title, too often come across as either indulgent time-filler or overflow with PSA-level superficiality.
  8. Jurassic World can't tell whether it wants to be junk food or not, lovingly poking fun at some Hollywood tropes while shamelessly indulging others.
  9. The moral dilemmas in On the Ice ultimately fail to resonate, Qalli's concluding plea for his flawed humanity coming off as strangely hollow.
  10. The Dead ultimately doesn't have much of a pulse, as it fails to transcend the banality of its inevitable theme.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 63 Critic Score
    It compellingly engages with the specific problems of a cultural group rarely represented in American film, but it too easily and abruptly resolves its main characters' problems.
  11. It reaches a peak of dramatic anguish in star Rachel Weisz's single moment of naked fury, rather than through the tenacity and compassion that define her crusading title character.
  12. The story places a premium on delivering its disreputable sex-and-violence goods with a minimum of fuss or pretension.
  13. If you grant the documentary its slanted perspective at the outset, it works well as its own state-of-the-union address.
  14. It isn't until the rushed conclusion when director Patrick Creadon shows the possibilities of what the documentary could have been.
  15. At its best, Magic Trip evokes the freewheeling, idealistic, psychedelic vibe of an era's origins; at worst, it's a film in which people narrate their own druggie home movies.
  16. Right up to its simplistic ending, the film is pleased to regurgitate the contrived tropes of the genre without ever honestly addressing the ethics of romantic boundaries.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    When the genre-film spectacle arrives, it's in full force, and the strictures of the framing device manage to amplify, rather than suppress, the impact of the shocks and scares.
  17. It certainly suffers from the staleness of its off-the-cuff, improv-inspired mode of comedy, which prizes free-form riffing over organically constructed comedic scenarios.
  18. Rampling is very much aware of the camera's every intention and possibility. Perhaps too aware, like the kind of over-educated narcissist for whom real spontaneity is too costly a risk.
  19. The ill use made of the stars' charms in this initially strained, then egregiously dopey mushfest can likely be credited to market-tested notions of modern popular romance.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    This is action-thriller feather preening, but all the wit in the world can't hide the narrative sprawl that rots from within.
  20. Less explored in all the ensuing back-patting is the question of whether Cameron is, in fact, sincerely interested in learning more about the world around him or whether this mission is merely intended to stroke his own ego.
  21. The documentary is briskly paced, often compelling, but a little soft, as it succumbs to hero worship.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    A four-year study of an Afghan war-bound group of friends (the mother of Cole, the goofy joker of the group, compares the boys to the characters in The Deer Hunter), Courtney's documentary is equal parts heartfelt and public-television predictable.
  22. For most of the film's running time, one mistakes the main character's callousness for the filmmakers'.
  23. For much of its runtime, the film is simply there, decent for the most part, but at no point immersive.
  24. Stuart Murdoch clearly knows quite a bit about crafting pop tunes, but the film's consideration of the work of songwriting is totally flippant.

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