Slant Magazine's Scores

For 2,134 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 32% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 66% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 9.7 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 52
Highest review score: 100 Consuming Spirits
Lowest review score: 0 Here Comes the Boom
Score distribution:
2,134 movie reviews
  1. Like a number of cult directors to emerge in the 1970s, Henry Jaglom values a party atmosphere at the expense of narrative cohesion.
  2. Despite aping its title in order to suggest quality by association, Bad Teacher has nothing in common with "Bad Santa" -- including, alas, a genuinely nasty sense of humor.
  3. Gus Van Sant's cinema, which of late has been fixated on immersing viewers in particular times and spaces, takes a detour into excruciating quirkland with Restless.
  4. Cargo can feel like a "film about human trafficking" from beginning to end.
  5. The film takes dramatic material that sounds fairly standard-issue to begin with and proceeds to uncover precious little of genuinely fresh intrigue within it.
  6. The film is so generous in its characterizations that it's easy to overlook the fact that its hot-topic drama (bullying, economic marginalization, etc.) amounts to little more than padded lip service.
  7. The movie's deathblow is the casting of poet-artist Miss Ming as Mammuth's affectless niece, whose twee verse and sculpture make Miranda July seem like a bearer of gravitas.
  8. Its audio-visual overload testifies to a group of filmmakers' belief that some films are made to be remade.
  9. A few jolting scares are deployed throughout, but more difficult to shake is how the story's overacting lambs walk a rather programmatic path toward slaughter--or at least anal probing.
  10. Yet another instance of a decent, potentially thorny premise bogged down in a mess of treacly sentiment and tedious moralizing.
  11. If the Adam Shankman film's debasement of its subject into campy kitsch is the unavoidable fate of all culturally dangerous art, that doesn't make it any less palatable.
  12. We're only allowed an insufficient glimpse of the anxiousness and curiosity that drive these creatures, a tactic which feels suspiciously like hesitance masquerading as enigma.
  13. It proves that the zombie narrative is still capable of subversion, but does so with the laziest, Lifetime-grade intimations of social relevance.
  14. With Travis Mathews's help, James Franco's persona forms a kind of symmetry: 1980's dubious homophobia against 2013's risible homophilia.
  15. Layered conflicts mount as this lean film treks on, and they're not limited to gender politics.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 63 Critic Score
    The film's unlikely combination of didacticism and sexy teen slaughter signals a booming trend: the Occupy horror flick.
  16. Where Spielberg has made WWII a venue for his sanctimonious side, a platform to convince viewers that war is indeed hell, Lucas is still in a state of pre-adolescent fascination with the conflict.
  17. Broadness this indolent hardly even stirs one to antipathy.
  18. This film has too many weak, unconnected strands (what's the subplot about the narrator's father doing here anyway?), too much overtly expositional dialogue, and too unfocused a narrative to really cohere. And then there's that whole matter of expendable whores.
  19. The Lorax is a modest gem, failing to significantly enhance its source material's ideas but still delivering a zany, rollicking, multi-character version of Seuss's environmental cautionary tale.
  20. As much as the dialogue in the film voices an attitude of self-liberation and champions the positives of severing accepted social constraints, it seems to be constantly taking one step forward and two steps back.
  21. This film buries its soul beneath its own pretentious rubble, and the youthful, labyrinthine mind in which it places viewers feels less like an offbeat vehicle for healing than it does a kaleidoscopic prison.
  22. Habermann may not be a pragmatic classic of the "Army of Shadows" mold, but it falls within the upper-mid bracket of WWII movies because it doesn't attempt to understand or define the tragedy it approaches.
  23. Dashing across the screen in all its bloody, gilded glory, the awesome and beautiful Immortals marks an all-win scenario.
  24. For all its pomp and fabulosity, Mirror Mirror is actually Tarsem Singh's most minimalistic effort, a dialed-down game board of elaborate pieces that's akin to the human chess set captained by Julia Robert's evil Queen Clementianna.
  25. The audience becomes conditioned to expect the action a few moves before the film makes them, which quickly renders the story tedious.
  26. As ticklish as one might find the idea of an equivalent Mr. Bean character occupying the driver's seat of a James Bond parody, it's likely that even a competent manifestation of such a scenario would pale in comparison to what Mike Myers and Jay Roach pulled off with apparent ease in their Austin Powers films.
  27. Director Marc Evans's monotonous style keeps the film earthbound.
  28. Tim Heidecker's Swanson does not amuse us in spite of the pity he inspires but because of it.
  29. The schmaltzy and benign tale of a ballroom dancer who accepts and transcends her unexpected disability through the power of art and love.

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