Slant Magazine's Scores

For 3,692 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 33% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 65% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 8.7 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 54
Highest review score: 100 The Color Wheel
Lowest review score: 0 Girl Most Likely
Score distribution:
3692 movie reviews
  1. It's when Stephen Dunn dares to inhabit the how and not the what of queerness that Closet Monster feels authentic and deliciously strange.
  2. Coming Home is a film in which everyone's dreams are irrevocably broken, the pieces too small to grasp, let alone pick up.
  3. The threat of feeling slighted links every small and large ripple of drama in Kelly Reichardt's film.
  4. The literalizing of Ivan Locke's hidden self and his inability to master it ultimately exposes the film as the squarest kind of theater: drama therapy.
  5. The film has a streamlined efficiency, but it feels like the work of a master who wants to please rather than probe.
  6. It has generous lashings of Aardman Animations' trademark warmth, visual inventiveness, and satisfying Claymation tactility.
  7. Of Bennett Miller's many directorial feats, his canniest is his depiction of the precariousness of bonds, and how those bonds can shift, drastically yet almost imperceptibly.
  8. One of the most distinct pleasures of Beginners is the way it puts together fragments of someone's life-presumably the filmmaker's, although little does it matter-with humility, and without vying for some complete whole.
  9. It forays into satirical terrain in order to elide actual dealings with the problems at hand, so that each piece feels alternatively frivolous and weighty.
  10. A ticking stopwatch hangs over Weekend that amplifies the intensity of every conversation, every fight, every drink, every copulation. In other words, it's a device.
  11. Under the Sun's overall aesthetic identifies a willingness to settle for an easy condemnation of an obviously abysmal regime, while not doing anything challenging or enlightening with all the outstanding footage collected.
  12. In its visionary dream and flashback sequences, the film becomes a comment on the rapidly diminished state of traditional animation.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Leviathan is a titanic achievement, a visceral overload whose impact registers immediately and with great force.
  13. No
    A singular biopic and a snapshot of a society renewed, No unaffectedly celebrates faith in democracy, and, surprisingly, truth in advertising.
  14. Pablo Larraín's film bluntly hammers home the notion that history is framed by perception rather than reality.
  15. Ursula Meier's film is sustained by a sturdy emotional engine and some intrepidly thoughtful characterization.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 63 Critic Score
    While the rush toward a conventional climax is confusing, and more than a little disappointing, there's an undeniable pleasure that emerges in seeing Tarantino juggle the dynamite of his ideas, even when they prematurely pop off in his face.
  16. The film has an artisanal intensity that prevents it from turning into a smug and predictable exercise in political revision.
  17. To dismiss it as simply an act of hipster appropriation is to cop out, because appropriation is the film's thematic meat.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Its fourth-wall-breaking wags a finger at the perceived facile nature of celebrity-driven mass culture even as it ultimately condescends to audiences.
  18. The next step in Jafar Panahi's personal cinema of captivity, a fully fictionalized, wildly bewildering work which imagines a man at war with his own creative impulse.
  19. Compared to your average Disney princesses, Moana is neither selfishly rebellious nor simplistically innocent.
  20. It confirms the Roy Andersson universe as one of near-fossilized similitude, in which any effort or movement is disruptive, revealing new cracks in the set illusion of order.
  21. Na Hong-jin's The Wailing is a work of thriller maximal-ism, a rare case of more actually being more rather than less.
  22. Aarón Fernández captures one of the most heartening elements of sex: that it doesn't always oblige our rules or expectations.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 63 Critic Score
    A nose-to-the-ground portrait of two believably aspirational protagonists and their constant hustle to make good on the movie's eponymous demand.
  23. The overall experience is entirely immersive, thanks not only to the filmmakers' handheld camera, but also to the illusory nature of the staging.
  24. There's a simple magnetism inherent in this kind of filmmaking, and the Coens know how to orchestrate it.
  25. It's a bit reductive in terms of a personal portrait, but this is a film that's not concerned with telling the story of a man, instead making him a representative symbol of a mostly bygone way of life, a reminder of both the fleeting nature of individual experience and the steady patterns of a broader human existence.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Bond's latest is a remarkable high watermark for the series: at once solemn and deeply funny, sexy and sad, self-conscious without all the rib-bruising elbowing.

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