Slate's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
For 1,484 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 43% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 54% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 0.3 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 61
Highest review score: 100 Force Majeure
Lowest review score: 0 Men in Black II
Score distribution:
1,484 movie reviews
  1. Britain's diplomatic corps may be as clueless and impotent as In the Loop suggests, but British comedians are fully capable of taking over the world.
  2. Even when you're able to guess the next calamity, it's still a shock in its ejaculatory intensity. The Farrellys never throw in the towel. Pretentious Sundance independents could learn a lot from such pistols.
  3. It's the human struggle that makes this a sci-fi masterpiece.
  4. Not enough happens in it. And yet everything happens in it.
  5. This is finally the zombie flick as cautionary political tale, and as humanist parable. It's not the flesh-gouging zombie we have to worry about, the filmmakers suggest, but the soul-gouging zombie within.
  6. Riveting and so suggestive that you can't consume it passively: You have to brood on it.
  7. It strides above its crudeness like a colossus. It's smart people telling dumb jokes with a brilliant sense of irony. Anchorman gives you permission to laugh like an idiot.
  8. The smartest, funniest, and best-looking sci-fi comedy since the movies learned to morph.
  9. My first viewing left me dazzled but slightly confused; a second deeply impressed; a third rhapsodic. I wish I hadn't needed to rediagram it in my head to turn it into the masterpiece it so obviously wants to be.
  10. A near-perfect piece of popular entertainment, a children's classic.
  11. The movie is so Burtonesque that it verges on self-parody--but it's fun and stunningly beautiful anyway.
  12. No
    It’s the rare political satire that can sound the depths of irony as No does and still end on a note of ambivalent hope.
  13. Though Sweetgrass has moments of great beauty, the film is never nostalgic or idealizing about its human or ovine subjects. It shows the relationship of human and domesticated animal—and the relationship of both to nature—as a productive and symbiotic yet often brutal struggle.
  14. The Ram is sometimes--often, even--a manipulative, self-pitying man, but Rourke and Aronofsky paint his portrait with a rigorous dignity.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Who's this movie for, again? No matter: It's impossible to find more joy in the dark at the moment.
  15. Almost to a one, the people Guest casts are virtuosos, and he lets them hit notes they can't hit anywhere else.
  16. Demme's movie exuberantly crosses the border from documentary into hagiography and from hagiography into celebration.
  17. Actors aren’t Navy SEALs, I know, but Johansson was, in fact, brave to take on this role: brave in that it’s a sharp left turn from what audiences expect or even like; brave in that she embraced an artistically bold method of building a movie when most other movie stars would have said no thanks to the idea of chatting up random Scotsmen in a van.
  18. Anderson must have needed that bonkers third-hour climax because there was nowhere to go short of spontaneous combustion.
  19. During the ghastly, surreal climax, I had fun closing one eye and with the other watching various ashen older men stumble toward the exit.
  20. I wasn't prepared for the slap-happy brilliance of Shrek 2, which should ideally be seen twice--once with kids, once savored at something like a midnight show.
  21. A warm, ingratiating, and fitfully hilarious epicurean road movie with a steady ache-an ache like a red-wine hangover.
  22. Is it or is it not stupendously friggin' rad? And the answer is yes. For most of the first hour, a good portion of the second, and even many of the 40 minutes left after that, Avatar is stupendously friggin' rad.
  23. Is Fiennes miscast? Perhaps. He's a high-strung, somewhat clammy actor--not the first to spring to mind for this warmly self-effacing plodder. But he's remarkably fine.
  24. A rollicking, comic-book Robin Hood plot and more furiously entertaining fight scenes than the ones in Ang Lee's solemn martial-arts art movie.
  25. A Hitchcock-ian murder mystery that unfolds into a maternal melodrama worthy of Joan Crawford, shot through with bursts of black humor. Bong's ability to sustain three or four different tones in one movie without betraying the emotional truth of the story is nothing short of amazing: He can pat his head, rub his stomach, and break our hearts all at the same time.
  26. Gallo’s movie is terrific, an original and disarming vision of a life that's all skids.
  27. Still, for me, Wuthering Heights' almost impersonal immersion in the light and texture and sound of the moors was the source of its vividness and necessity. In order for the art of literary adaptation to remain vital, we have to be willing to let directors throw aside the book and film their dream of it.
  28. The miracle of the movie is the Bolger sisters, who are so direct and matter-of-fact that they hardly seem to be acting. But their simplicity is radiant.
  29. A grave screwball comedy. Its gags aren't just hilarious -- they have a weighty, plaintive soul.

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