Slate's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
For 1,650 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 44% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 53% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 0.5 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 63
Highest review score: 100 Manchester by the Sea
Lowest review score: 0 The Amityville Horror
Score distribution:
1650 movie reviews
  1. This is an amazing movie.
  2. Isn't just the most explosively entertaining movie musical in a couple of decades. It's going to be the most influential: the one that inspires the rebirth of the Hollywood musical.
  3. It might be the cinema's most astonishing holy war film. The Lord of the Rings took seven years and an army of gifted artists to execute, and the striving of its makers is in every splendid frame. It's more than a movie--it's a gift.
  4. Only in the medium of animation could a conceit as elaborate as Inside Out’s be dramatized, and only animation this well-designed and executed could bring such a story so vibrantly to life.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    A desolate, fast, funny, scary film, and it takes more risks than any recent film.
  5. Munich is the most potent, the most vital, the best movie of the year.
  6. Each character in this movie — down to the smallest cameo by Lonergan himself — is an individual rather than a type, prone to spontaneous changes of mood and sometimes amusing outbursts of pettiness or ill humor.
  7. The swift-moving, pulse-pounding Dunkirk reveals its filmmaker at his most nimble, supple, and simple.
  8. 45 Years is about the relationship of the present to the past and of our past loves to our present lives—a relationship that, like any good marriage, remains a total mystery.
  9. I don't just mean it's one of the best movies of the past six years. Children of Men, based on the 1992 novel by P.D. James, is the movie of the millennium because it's about our millennium, with its fractured, fearful politics and random bursts of violence and terror.
  10. An absolutely magical fusion of deadpan Ealing comedy and Gothic horror.
  11. I feared signing on to Creed might derail Coogler’s and Jordan’s careers. Instead, this revitalizing crowd-pleaser solidifies my belief that these two have the potential to create really great art.
  12. This is the best movie I've seen in a decade. For once it's no hyperbole to say, "Unforgettable!"
  13. The rare film about the life of an artist that is itself a work of art.
  14. A completely different kind of animated movie that, even more than "Ratatouille," reimagines what the medium can do.
  15. If the Coen brothers’ dramas are cautionary tales, their comedies are veritable how-to guides for people who can’t help but enjoy a mirthless chuckle at the humility of human existence. Yeah, the joke is on us, but that doesn’t mean it isn’t funny.
  16. On first viewing, Crazy Heart seemed like a pretty good movie with one great performance. After a second time through, it's sneaking up on the title of my favorite film of the year.
  17. Feels fresher, leaner, and faster than any action movie in years.
  18. American satire rarely comes more winning than Election, an exuberantly caustic comedy that shows the symbiotic relationship between political go-get-'em-ism and moral backsliding.
  19. Asghar Farhadi's A Separation serves as a quiet reminder of how good it's possible for movies to be.
  20. For all its borrowing and bricolage, La La Land never feels like a backward-looking or unoriginal work. Even when not every one of its risks pays off the way that first song does, this movie is bold, vital, funny, and alive.
  21. A collage of pain that breaks over you like a wave. Every second you can feel the cost to Caouette of what he's showing: The sounds and the images are like a pipeline from his unconscious to the screen.
  22. Like Clueless or Breakfast at Tiffany’s, it’s a great American comedy, and like Boyhood and Dazed and Confused, another easygoing masterpiece from our reigning auteur of hidden depths.
  23. If you're interested in the history of the human race-if you're a member of the human race-you owe it to yourself to see this movie.
  24. It plays the whole absurd shell game for laughs, even as it acknowledges that the last and bitterest laugh is on the rest of us.
  25. Qualifies as one of my favorite movies of all time. This 1932 masterpiece, now digitally restored with retranslated subtitles and a newly recorded score, is a silent film that doesn't feel silent at all.
  26. Gus Van Sant and screenwriter Dustin Lance Black pull off something very close to magic. They make a film that's both historically precise and as graceful, unpredictable, and moving as a good fiction film--that is to say, a work of art.
    • Slate
  27. For a story that's all about the harnessing of fateful chthonic forces, Paul Thomas Anderson has dug deeper than ever before, and struck black gold.
  28. Ida
    There’s an urgency to Ida’s simple, elemental story that makes it seem timely, or maybe just timeless.
  29. I loved it. Or, to put it another way, I loved it, I loved it, I loved it. I loved every gorgeous sick disgusting ravishing overbaked blood-spurting artificial frame of it.

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