Sonicnet's Scores

  • Music
For 287 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 55% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 42% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 1.8 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 71
Highest review score: 100 Wasp Star (Apple Venus, Pt. 2)
Lowest review score: 30 Unified Theory
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 1 out of 287
287 music reviews
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Welch has become a notable talent on that long, rootsy highway, and she and Rawlings have fashioned their own unique sound.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The Blueprint is not a perfect album. Some of the material is undoubtedly filler. But this recording makes it clear that hip-hop is supposed to be fun -- and that Jay-Z is having a ball.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The only complaints involve omissions. Four of five singles between '92 and '94 (among them the minor American hit, "Bang") aren't here, which bypasses the band's crucial early development and leaves only one song from Modern Life, the punchy "For Tomorrow." On the other hand, the disc could easily have shed at least one of its five offerings from Parklife -- most noticeably the title track.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Even at its slickest moments, Gung Ho is worthwhile, not only for Smith's lyrics but for her soulful vocals. At 53, she sounds much like the jazz vocalists who develop and train their voices as they age.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Little Sparrow captures one of country's greatest talents in top form, backed by some of the best acoustic players around...
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Agaetis Byrjun is an impressively unself-conscious record that would have been difficult to make in a trend-obsessive center like London or New York. It is sincere and though its influences may be familiar, its beauty and tenderness are refreshingly new.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    TP-2.com isn't the masterpiece Kelly seems capable of, but it's as strong an R&B album as any since, well, since R., balancing the carnal and the spiritual as convincingly as anyone's done it since Prince in the 1980s.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    In toeing the fine line between clever and dumb, they've always worn their "I'm With Stupid" T-shirts with goofy pride. But don't cry for them, as this time they've polished their musical turd to a brilliant sheen.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's too bad this independently released album will most likely fall through the commercial cracks, because Stag is one of those rare albums that fuses aggression, good music and sharp institutional critiques without sounding strident or, um, stiff.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The spy-music fetish and dubbed-out paranoia of the band's first two albums are traded in for earthy Stax soul and sprightly disco funk, along with plenty of turntable wobbles, wah-wah scratches and analog squiggles...
    • 46 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The Surfers teeter on the brink of conventional rock values. However, throughout the new album, singer Gibby Haynes drives the proverbial truck into the ditch with rambling psychotic speeches.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    One of the best things about Ms. C as an artist, especially considering her indie-ish background, is that she hasn't been afraid to embrace plastic pop as a vehicle for self-expression. More importantly, though, having found success within this genre , Vitamin C here takes chances instead of relying purely on formula.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    At first audition, Broadcast is disposable John Barry-inspired pop drenched in overcharged organs, egregious electronic overproduction and languorous vocals that somehow have no residue.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It is clear that these two albums need to be heard and absorbed side by side?
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    When you can make out their lyrics... you realize that these guys are really the artier, more nuanced and textured cousins of Korn.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Gerald ups the ante again, incorporating astounding vocalists, intricate bass and drum patterns, and mood-altering melodies and tones to take the electronic dance community by storm.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    One of the most exciting pop-music experiments to along in a long while.... Selmasongs works as an album, not just as a souvenir of a daring cinematic and musical venture.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Continues in the bucolic vein of Deserter's Songs, and sounds almost as wondrous.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Horns, keyboards and acoustic guitars dominate the 10 tracks here, with an overall live sound that steers clear of the studio effects the band embraced with their last release, Guerrilla.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The writing shines throughout... Steve Earle seems able to do anything he cares to.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Slayer return to the knuckle-busting fury of their demonic 1986 speed metal classic, Reign in Blood, while still somehow managing to spike their sonic mayhem with some catchy riffing and the odd melodic vocal line.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Incorporating free-jazz squonk into sultry bossa nova with tempo-defying breaks and ethereal atmospherics is no easy feat, but somehow, the London duo pull it off.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Vega's been good before, especially on her eponymous 1985 debut and its '87 follow-up, Solitude Standing, but never as consistently good as she is here.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Because her samples are so shameless, so out in the open, what No More Drama sounds like in the end is Blige singing along to the radio: equal parts fan and artist.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    While Placebo's latest, Black Market Music, doesn't have any single track as galvanizing as "Pure Morning," Molko, Swedish bassist Stefan Olsdal, and English drummer Steve Hewitt have again crafted a hip-hop-laced collection of hard-driving rock that effectively mixes clever wordplay with solid musicianship.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    1997's Homogenic, also a mixture of heavy beats and strings, was not as varied or complete as this album, and while Selmasongs, last year's soundtrack to "Dancer in the Dark" (in which Björk starred), was lovely in its own sweeping, cinematic way, Björk has surpassed herself with this new work.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Happily deviates from the Moon Safari mold of new wave kitsch and sugary pop, guiding the knob-twisting duo's retro-synth sensibilities into a darker, more brooding realm.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Radiohead have remembered how to feel, and do so without relying on the arena rock bluster of The Bends, the Orwellian remoteness of OK Computer or Kid A's pretense as a sort of MC Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band. That's why Amnesiac sounds like their best album.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    ESG may have been heard mostly in other artists' songs, but A South Bronx Story is an impressive attempt to focus attention on the force behind the samples.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Lovers' Rock ranks among the finest albums of the year, as Sade, nimbly utilizing that distinctively smoky, vulnerable instrument that is her voice, weaves gentle yet insinuating odes to love and loss.