Sonicnet's Scores

  • Music
For 287 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 55% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 42% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 1.8 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 71
Highest review score: 100 Wasp Star (Apple Venus, Pt. 2)
Lowest review score: 30 Unified Theory
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 1 out of 287
287 music reviews
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    At once epic, playful and a little bit strange, the duo's latest effort perpetuates the brothers' patented geek-chic, though things come across as more introspective and ambient this time around.... Alternately excellent, kitschy and lackluster...
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    John and Frank Navin, the brotherly core of Chicago's Aluminum Group, produce impeccably tailored bachelor-pad pop with a cynical bite -- like a less restrained Sea & Cake or a more Anglicized Stereolab.... More post-consumer than post-rock, the Aluminum Group's environmentally conscious sounds will make your ears feel as comfortable and cultured as fine quality furnishings.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Lacking Pierce's unifying vision, The Carnivorous Lunar Activities Of ... tries hard to make a virtue out of stylistic schizophrenia, and only partly succeeds.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    This album shows a band eager to expand its creative range. One wonders, sadly, what might have come next.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Despite their retro stylings, this Orange County, California band has served up a sixth album that is better (by leaps and bounds) than the punk-by-numbers that dominated their first two albums, 1989's Offspring and '93's Ignition. Further, Conspiracy has more well-written, hook-laden songs than anything found on their fluke indie hit, '94's fittingly titled Smash, or their too-boring-to-be-a-sell-out 1997 major label debut, Ixnay on the Hombre.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    On the plus side, the album sounds really nice.... The problem is, things get a little too lazy and hazy; Reveal's 12 tracks all move with almost the exact same dreamy, midtempo lope.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Much of the album has the odd, rehashed sound of a Blur record produced by the Automator, but the diverse guests keep at least every other song fresh and new.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    It's an uneven mix that frustrates by offering just samples of what Pearl Jam increasingly does best, namely, provide clear and, yes, quiet stories about the travails of everyday life.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Just as Stewart's last major hit wisely spoke directly to his generation, Human unwisely seeks to plug him into the present one.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    If you fish around a bit, you'll find several good ideas here, some of which may have worked better in different hands.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    It's hard to imagine The Golden D as having much of an impact.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The problem is, as the album drags on, young Master Mathers wastes his considerable wit and opts to grouse in the guise of a rampaging reactionary. Song after song finds Eminem viciously baiting real and imagined enemies, as if that's all he knows how to do.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Twisted Tenderness hits its turning point on the title track (RealAudio excerpt), a solitary, surefire progressive-house hit that recalls the Pet Shop Boys' 1999 album, Nightlife. From that point the album's energy improves considerably -- so there's the twist: It's not new, but it's improved.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Unfortunately, the heavy-handed folk-pop production... doesn't serve Williams well here.... In general, the overwrought keyboards and Steve Holley's percussion... could use a good slapdown.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Kid A represents the first time in Radiohead's short history where their desire to do something different has outrun their ability to give their experiments a personal imprint. The problem with the album isn't that it's introspective, or obscure, or even that it's derivative (alternately conjuring Eno, Aphex Twin, Pink Floyd and so forth), but rather that the striking group personality so well defined on the last two collections has seemed to evaporate.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Wildly uneven -
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    On this excursion into the noodle-prone mind of Mr. Lee. True, all the lyrics are his and his alone, but after all this time, plenty of Peart has rubbed off on him, resulting in much impenetrable mumbo jumbo about the universe and its "secrets" ("The Angels Share") and the workings of the mind...
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    For the most part, Malpractice unfortunately matches Redman's pro forma boasts and refreshing modesty with pro forma music and not-so-refreshing beats.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Devils Night is nothing special, and it's only saved from the slush pile by Eminem's inventive, cutting-edge raps and Dr. Dre's so-funky-it's-evil production.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Date of Birth is packed with hard-driving, repetitive beats that are equal parts Wu-Tang Clan and Gang Starr, yet the music lacks either of those groups' charms.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Why is Quality Control -- an album no doubt many will love simply because of its hip- hop politics -- so damn bland? For all their good intentions, J5's results are so monochromatic, of such a singular focus on staying true to a specific kind of hip-hop blueprint, that even the inclusion of grinning left-field randomness... lacks the fun it means to inject.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Unfortunately, this newest attempt at expanding the group's musical horizons is more a lateral move than a vertical one, and the same problems that have plagued Better Than Ezra since Deluxe -- mawkish, derivative material -- undermine this effort as well.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The problem isn't so much that this album sounds dated (not surprising, as it was recorded back when Lil Bow Wow was in pre-K), but rather that the songs are so poorly mixed and produced...
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The results are unfortunately as atrocious as they are blasphemous, setting a tone that keeps Vavoom! mostly falling flat on its straining-to-jump-jive-an'-wail face.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    A mostly disappointing misfire that seems too eager for commercial pop success.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    She lets [the songs] drift off into the kind of embalmed chamber music respectability often synonymous with the Nonesuch label.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Communicate's energy level lags in places, trying to make up for in quantity what it lacks in consistent quality.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Unfortunately, they've simply traded one constrictive, predictable format for another.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    On Bridge, they're still traveling down the long and winding improvisational road, with most of the tracks averaging around five minutes in length (as is true with most of their studio albums). This time out, though, the songs feel like they're twice that.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Unfortunately, the obtrusive vocals mess up the vibe like an unwelcome party crasher. Underworld's experiments with electronica, vocals and rock are dismal failures.