Sonicnet's Scores

  • Music
For 287 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 55% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 42% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 1.5 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 70
Highest review score: 100 The "W"
Lowest review score: 30 Unified Theory
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 1 out of 287
287 music reviews
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Feeding everything from polyrhythmic samba marches and interstellar jazz excursions into his mixer-microprocessor, then topping them off with obsessive beat-programming, Tobin blurs the boundaries between organic and prefabricated, as if the coexistence of the two should be an undeniable rule.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A sizeable chunk of the album contains what is by far some of the best material this group has done in ages.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    I readily admit I was confused by its unusual instrumental combinations, by the turn-on-a-dime melodies and rhythms, and the "still searching after all these years" lyrics -- by its relentless eclecticism. Still, I kept listening, and at the end of the day found myself having trouble escaping these meandering, insinuating songs.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's all remarkably effective. In capturing "the ghost in the machine," Mirwais has made a most warm and humane album.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The resonant and smooth singing takes some getting used to if you're familiar with earlier, craggier, quirkier recordings, but by the gallant train-wreck tragedy of "Engine 143", I found myself singing along.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Given the changes that both New York and Jackson have undergone over the years, it's fitting that the new album lacks the swagger and bubbly feel of the first edition, and instead leaves the listener sad and gray...
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Replete with tasty elements borrowed from jungle, drum & bass and contemporary Afro-pop, their fifth full-length album manages to blend and synthesize all their disparate source material better than any previous effort save their startling 1982 debut.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Hiatt holds down the drummerless rhythm with his acoustic six-string and a National resonator guitar. The boisterous atmosphere (everybody hoots and hollers) evokes a back-porch picking session, and Hiatt's songs draw from similarly down-home sources.... a recording that reflects the spirit of musicians who live to sing and play.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Incorporating free-jazz squonk into sultry bossa nova with tempo-defying breaks and ethereal atmospherics is no easy feat, but somehow, the London duo pull it off.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Deep Down & Dirty is the group's hardest, most animated and strongest-sounding album to date.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    His most consistently slamming release since 1990's Brick by Brick.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    A borderline adult-contemporary sound that's catchy and exuberant enough to gloss over the intermittently dark verse.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Although he's the primary MC throughout this album, it's his studio skills that keep listeners on their toes...
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Lemon Jelly's groovy, Technicolor music exudes a warmth and sense of fun that predates samplers, sequencers and the concept of the DJ-as-auteur.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    J.Lo has a feisty, damn-I-know-I'm-all-that attitude, combined with pulsating, insistent beats that leap out of the speakers and make you wanna move.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    In sharing its predecessor's desire to cover every musical base, Goodbye Country (Hello Nightclub) suggests a continued identity crisis.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Private Suit finds them more in command of their craft, filled with less fury, but no less skilled at crafting sublime pop ditties.... Though there are a couple of misfires, it's their most confident effort since their debut.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The funk-by-numbers grooves of Everybody's Got Their Something borrow heavily from the likes of Sly Stone, Chaka Khan and early Prince, but do so with such affection and spirit that it's hard to take offense.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Even though O'Connor adopts a penitent tone on Faith and Courage, this album is no concession to anyone or anything. O'Connor is still O'Connor: strident, contradictory, motherly, seductive.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    If it's energy that it is the single strongest selling point of God Bless the Go-Go's, well, that's kind of where they came in anyway, back in the day when lead singer Belinda Carlisle was a butch-haircutted pudge and "We Got the Beat" was, literally, just about all the Go-Gos had going for them musically.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    With Lewis' weighty, tuneful voice and Mike Mushok's meaty, anthemic guitar, Staind recall the Soundgarden/Alice in Chains era of early-'90s rock. Free of phony posturing, DJ scratching and over-reliance on vapid thrash riffs, they're almost like an alternative version of today's mainstream metal.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Tha Last Meal, mixed and largely produced by Dre (Master P is the executive producer), manages to sidestep the déjà-vu-all-over-again pitfalls by injecting the formula with sly wit, a healthy helping of cosmic slop, and, last but not least, some mind-bending production.
    • 95 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Their songs still bulge at the seams with clever ideas, but they're veiled in deep grooves and hooks.... Outkast have developed a major sweet tooth for P-Funk, but what they've picked up from their former collaborator George Clinton isn't his low-end bounce. It's rather his hovering, serpentine vocal arrangements and his acidic political fantasies.... [but] Stankonia's conceptual sprawl isn't all good for the album -- the collection is hampered by more than a little filler.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    With Movement in Still Life however, BT (born Brian Transeau) offers something many of his peers have failed to deliver: an album that accurately and convincingly reflects dance music's present state and, possibly, its future.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Another quality installation from an artist who views his entire oeuvre as a work in progress.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    It ain't Dusty Springfield's Dusty in Memphis, but it's close.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    While fans expecting "Thong Redux" might be disappointed, there are flashes of (dare one say it?) integrity and substance nestled deep in the banging beats and big-time excesses that make Sisqó, well, Sisqó.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The duo deliver an evocative, mostly instrumental set that effectively serves their inspiration, as well as their fanbase.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Mandy Moore is a pop album to be proud of: every song has a good melody, a solid hook, and dramatically improved singing from its star.