Sonicnet's Scores

  • Music
For 287 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 55% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 42% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 1.6 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 70
Highest review score: 100 Bow Down To The Exit Sign
Lowest review score: 30 Unified Theory
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 1 out of 287
287 music reviews
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Most of the new disc sounds like noisy grooves in search of songs, and the mechanical accompaniment makes the accomplished jazz-rock fusion of such mid-1970s Beck classics as Blow by Blow and Wired sound downright earthy.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Listeners might tire of its mechanical edge, but luckily Daft Punk folds in a few more layers. Whether the listener believes it or not, Discovery postulates that club music can possess depth of sound and be more than a never-ending beat that simply marshals your body along with it. Thus, the songs are shorter, more eclectic and rife with hills and valleys of beat that urge you to stop and listen.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    And while not so instantly accessible as much of the band's recent output, the songs still manage to be catchy, if elusively so; this is an album that rewards repeated listening.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Judging by the funked-up grooves and the hardcore-with-heart rhymes, he's got the goods to satisfy both the faithful and the fickle.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The album would have benefited from a few less midtempo grooves; the closest drummer Neil Primrose and bassist Dougie Payne get to really rocking is on the peppier rhythms of "Follow the Light" and "Flowers in the Window" -- not surprisingly, two of the album's highlights.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Live in New York City is that imperfect creation in which the whole equals something less than the sum of its parts. Taken one song at a time, though, it can be as compelling as live music gets.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    But if "Chemistry" is a pure-pop sugar rush, much of what follows is equally sour, often falling into the thematic trap that snares so many post-hit albums: lots of songs about how success is really hard on rock stars and their girlfriends.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    In small doses it's wonderful stuff, though in total it's a little sickly sweet.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The resulting sonic model represents a giant step in the evolution of sound sculpture
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Producer Don Was allows the surprisingly girlish, persuasive part of Midler's style to shine, working in harmony with the production and the material.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Jakob Dylan and his team have fashioned an album that's longer on big guitars, crunchy grooves and cool changes than overt confessionals. All told, Breach is a subtle, seamless effort with nary a lull or misstep -- in contrast to its multiplatinum predecessor, the second half of which suffered from a series of pedestrian songs.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    At times, Yang's ethereal monotone is the attention-getter. Elsewhere, the music takes over, often in the form of lengthy guitar solos and a slow, bittersweet weaving of instruments traditional... and otherwise.... This is smart, deep-thinking slowcore.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Melodies howl along before being ground down under the weight of distorted guitar. Strings float songs along, then scrabble against the flow.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    A six-piece with musical roots in the '60s, fronted by a sensual-sounding blonde bombshell called Debbie, the Januaries' most obvious reference point is Blondie.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Many of the 14 songs here are laced with the type of psychedelic lyrics that have always characterized Kirkwood's writing...
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Harding has streamlined his lyrics and placed them in taut, soulful settings à la John Hiatt...
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Ivy specialize in nebulously oriented dream-pop: too ethereal for straight pop fans, too structured for the 4AD crowd. The result is rather like Swing Out Sister playing with all the rock and roll abandon of, say, the Sundays.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    With its superslick production and Mariah Carey-esque vocal histrionics, the "Latin" elements in Mi Reflejo are more sanitized than Santana-ized...
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Lacking Pierce's unifying vision, The Carnivorous Lunar Activities Of ... tries hard to make a virtue out of stylistic schizophrenia, and only partly succeeds.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    On the surface, Callahan sounds like he's getting out more.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    There's the sense that, in trying to be a Tribe-meets-Portishead hybrid, the Manchester, England, production duo of Mark Rae and Steve Christian have missed the target, as if true brilliance lies just around the corners they didn't turn.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Though many of the songs here are associated with male artists, James usually succeeds in injecting her own womanly strength and style into her renditions, making the tunes indisputably her own.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    John and Frank Navin, the brotherly core of Chicago's Aluminum Group, produce impeccably tailored bachelor-pad pop with a cynical bite -- like a less restrained Sea & Cake or a more Anglicized Stereolab.... More post-consumer than post-rock, the Aluminum Group's environmentally conscious sounds will make your ears feel as comfortable and cultured as fine quality furnishings.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    But if it verges on generic pop-rock, Take Back... also has more hooks than a bait and tackle shop.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    While Beyoncé is credited with co-writing and co-producing the entire album, merging the Destiny's Child camp with a stronger guiding hand (say, the Rodney Jerkins tribe) might've helped weed out the weaker material -- and kept the flame going throughout this uneven album.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    When System's at their best, the Los Angeles four-piece evokes most vividly punk politicos the Dead Kennedys.... Yet the band sputters out when the lyrics are awash in vagueness.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    None of these songs are as ear-catching as the first album's "Gotta Man." And to play up Swizz Beatz's contributions is to point out how frequently Eve gets lots in the beats when they're slamming, and how she never enhances them when they're not.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Traditionalist rock fans have got to be cheered by Fastball, a group plucky enough to take on teenage pop bands and rap-rock sensations with perky harmonies and piles of guitars. But in the end, songs like these shine brightest outside of the album context, as stand-alone songs coming out of the dashboard radio.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    All told, eight producers (including Nicks) were involved in the production of Trouble in Shangri-La, and not everybody is up to the challenge.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    The album is short on the wistful melodies and jazz overtones that have made Squarepusher stand out from his fellow post-everything experimentalists, making Go Plastic -- notwithstanding "My Red Hot Car" -- something of a disappointment.