Spin Cycle's Scores

  • Music
For 99 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 51% higher than the average critic
  • 1% same as the average critic
  • 48% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 2 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 70
Highest review score: 100 Motherland
Lowest review score: 25 Song Yet To Be Sung
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 71 out of 99
  2. Negative: 5 out of 99
99 music reviews
    • 77 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Pulling it all together is her beautifully rough voice, which has grown more precise without losing any of its raw, bluesy power.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Track after solid track, "Motherland" is a collection of pure, soulful offerings.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Teetering between darkness and light, Hersh's somersaults have never been more compelling.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    The wildly disparate influences and sensibilities mesh to great effect on this stunning album.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    The music that Bragg and Wilco have wrapped around the exquisite 15 sets of Guthrie lyrics is much more mature, cohesive and layered than its predecessor.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The refrains and horn tracks of "Quality Control" are all the ammo you'll need in your next argument about the rejuvenation of hip-hop.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    "Gold" proves that Ryan Adams is capable of blending a myriad of styles and influences.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Pierce enhances his trademark electro-scapes with rich gospel choruses and grand orchestral flourishes for operatic effect.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    It doesn't really break any new ground, but that's not the point. This record is about Dylan cutting loose and celebrating the richness of American music.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    The quartet has cooled its eclectic babbling, and "Hot Shots II" whirrs and purrs like a gleeming silver sports car.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    A typically bruised and beautiful collection of lovelorn ballads, Raymond Carveresque character studies and darkly romantic confessionals.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Slayer remains an elemental metal band, continuing to surge on something high-grade and uncut.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Much of the Painters’ power stems from Kozelek’s arresting voice, which meets its deep, moody match in the band’s exquisite renderings of rootsy gothic grace.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    The most introspective and slow-tempo collection in Björk's catalog, "Vespertine" proves to be a rousing showcase of her captivating vocal talent.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Hype for the Strokes is well deserved--it's hard to imagine a more vital American rock band.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    The album's meticulous attention to detail never overshadows Jackson's frisky good mood.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Part torch song, part Broadway, part cabaret, "Poses" is as theatrical as its animated creator is in performance.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    But, to get right down to it, "Celebrity" is fun, like its predecessors.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    "Strange Little Girls" is not a pretty album, but that's the point: the ugliness of male-female relations, which she exposes bit by bit with each cover, is a fact that is--in both pop music and pop culture--all too often ignored.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Sexsmith's gorgeous vocals and refined songwriting shine through.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Demonstrates a virility missing from [1993's "Republic"].
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Their third release has no apparent monster single like "The Way," but the recording as a whole contains a higher number of strong songs. It rocks harder, and the band's previously overpowering influences--most notably Elvis Costello--are now beautifully integrated into a more developed and identifiable sound.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Some of the best music he's created since his release from prison on drug charges nearly six years ago.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Here, the sinfully motivating stew results in a record that goes on and on in its repetitive jive, sucking the listener into the blissfully happy world of Hindi-rock.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The trademark woeful brood is firmly intact. This time around, however, the Scottish duo has taken a slightly more playful approach to its music.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Smith's talent lays in his ability, like Tom Waits, to create a surreal landscape populated by crafty guitar and piano work and a haunting, layered voice that climbs cheek to cheek with his instruments to create something unheard of today.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    There are moments on this album when you remember Nirvana used to open for J Mascis' old band, Dinosaur Jr. There are many such moments, gloriously ragged snatches of rock.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    An unadulterated fey morsel.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    In contrast to the 6ths' blissed-out "Wasps Nests," which included indie credibles Lou Barlow and Georgia Hubley, "Hyacinths" mines cabaret territory.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Burnside's singing is the strongest it's been in years, hitting aching falsettos in "Bad Luck City" and then, on the title track, letting his voice get as dark and gritty as the silt of the Mississippi River.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This is a record that will certainly find its way into the clubs and on to "best of" lists as the year goes on.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The real standouts here, though, are the ballads. With "I Deserve It" and "Gone," the legacy of the corporeal and spiritual Madonna lays down amid the simplicity of basic percussive beats and acoustic guitar.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Spoon is the best British band to come out of Austin, Texas.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    But with gems like “Keep From Moving” and the country-tinged "Under the Tracks,” and even the vaguely disturbing, second-hand Bowie of “Lover’s Leap," the Creepers rein in their messier instincts, paring the proceedings down to smart, singalong and ultimately giddy jangle-pop.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    "Amnesiac" deepens the mystery that Radiohead began with its curious, largely electronic 2000 release, "Kid A," and certainly won't satiate those awaiting the lauded band's supposed return to guitar-heavy epics.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    By delivering pert '60s-esue pop numbers with a twangy drawl, and by playing rockabilly riffs on torchy blues odes, Jack and Meg balance their divergent influences well.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    An accessible, if far from revolutionary, work.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    While nothing else on "Play" quite matches the slinky intimacy of its Top 10 single, "Jaded," every song has something to root for, whether it's the title track's inventive genre-shuffle, Tyler's spontaneous yodeling or the way "Under My Skin" continues the band's love of gender-bending.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    A platter of hot-buttered R&B popcorn, liberally sprinkled with salty social critique, "The Id" finds Gray getting disco-freaky while instigating her "Sexual Revolution," and playfully rapping about her kids with Slick Rick on the funky burner "Hey Young World II."
    • 50 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Deeply original? No. A rollicking, sing-along good time? Yes.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    As always, Kravitz infuses his rock with enough funk to get you moving, and his catchy choruses will echo in your head long after the album ends.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Carpenter delivers a batch of reassuring songs -- about confidence in yourself and the world -- making you wish she'd check in a bit more often.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Unfortunately, the record is burdened by a pretentious, overarching narrative about "the Wise One" and his struggle with "the Banished Ones."
    • 87 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    As unhurried and sonically majestic a slab as Low has ever produced.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Suggests Kraftwerk crashing a party at the Playboy Mansion.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Songwriter Doug Martsch again succeeds in striking an impressive balance between guitar-saturated bombast and impeccable melodic taste.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Sisqo proves he's more than a flash in the pan.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    When it clicks, "Aaliyah" transforms the confusion of young adulthood into exhilarating freedom
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Though it's no "Bloodletting," it does make for a satisfying reminder of that masterpiece.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    "Lateralus" is primarily a collection of puzzling time changes, haunting vocals and beyond-intricate percussive patterns that create a theme rooted more in Eastern philosophy than in rock and roll.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Its touchy-feely lyrics maintain the brooding undercurrent that runs beneath the bulk of the band's catalogue.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    A maniacal slab of DIY punk rock ?
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Not only does Marshall make each of the album's dozen songs her own, but she leaves you straining to recognize the original in what she's marvelously reconfigured.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    An infectious record.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    His loving treatment of these 16 tunes (counting one hidden track) is testament to both the rich legacy of American music and Alvin's own reverence for things past.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Fans will be happy to find Jakob more upfront, and keyboardist Rami Jaffe utilized, but differently than past straightforward organ parts.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Admittedly, he seems to be missing a sparring partner like McCabe and thus, "Alone" often suffers a lack of tension. Still, Ashcroft's unabashed joy is rather contagious.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The band neither succeeds wildly nor fails. There are only a few reminders of the lackluster dance sounds in its recent work... Otherwise, what dominates are the straight-ahead rhythms that drove the early days.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Rarity collections can often times be largely unsatisfying to anyone but die-hard fans, but not so with ASTH. Songs such as "Bring Your Lovin' Back Here," "78 Stone Shuffle" and "Steve McCroski" stand up against the best of anything the band has recorded.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Critic Score
    The electronics are intact, but rather than rely on monitors and keyboards to produce familiar sounds, Depeche Mode lifts its chin and puts vocals first for some surprisingly taut techno-balladry.... Still, old habits are hard to break, and "Exciter" carries a couple of ill-advised indulgences.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Critic Score
    Clever rhythms, tricky harmonies and diverse musical reference points -- including the opening riff from Stevie Nicks' "Edge of Seventeen" -- frequently distract from the lyrical shortcomings.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Critic Score
    A sweet and sometimes bitter pack of world-weary bubblegum pop.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Critic Score
    There's nothing on this album quite like the guilty pleasure of "Candy," her textbook pop number from "So Real."
    • 73 Metascore
    • 63 Critic Score
    Something of a mixed bag, "Production" teeters between grating aimlessness and uniquely dark, claustrophobically compressed runs through the Vocoder-happy lands of French house music.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Critic Score
    X.O. Experience is more commercial and polished than the group's previous three efforts.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 63 Critic Score
    Just as little has changed on the radio front, so has Cake stuck with its market-proven formula on "Comfort Eagle."
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Critic Score
    The album may not break much new ground, but the band's performance is more dynamic than on previous releases.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 63 Critic Score
    Having traded in affected spooky vocals and idiosyncratic song structures for straight-ahead rock, however, Black seems to suffer a crisis of confidence on "Dog in the Sand."
    • 72 Metascore
    • 63 Critic Score
    The band, while heavy on charm, is light in its ability to demonstrate any diversity in its songs.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 63 Critic Score
    Ultimately, the record is kept from wonderfulness by too much drowsy material--it lacks [Neil] Young's screwball conviction or the hallucinogenic intensity of the VU.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 63 Critic Score
    "Cuttin' Heads" isn't covering much new ground.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    It's that menacing air surrounding "Familiar" that makes it worth a listen, and Oasis is, quite simply, loads of rock and roll fun.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    The results on "Solitary Man" are mixed, leaning at times to inadvertent novelty.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    A 12-song collection of ear candy so sweet as to give many listeners a toothache.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Lee has produced a competent, contemplative record that should tide fans over until the power trio's long-awaited return to local arenas.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    The band nearly succeeds in messing with your head. However, front man Courtney Taylor's hamming like Jagger on "Bohemian Like You" and the country schlock of "Country Leaver" are definite buzzkills.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    On its fourth full-length adventure, Glaswegian septet Belle & Sebastian wanders away from their painfully catchy melodies with symphonic '70s-esque feather rock.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    He's ditched dusty folk LPs for guest appearances by stars such as Bootsy Collins and Macy Gray. Gentrification suits him. For all her classic-soul flare, Gray is fond of abrasive nuance. Her singing is the perfect analog counterpart to his techno-philia; those saliva-laden glitches turn her catch phrases into perfect little samples.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    There are hints of the stuttered hooks that snared listeners on the band's '95 debut, yet they're so snarled in manic sound, you're unsure whether you're being grabbed or gagged.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Following a path forged by fellow U.K. exports Badly Drawn Boy and Travis, still-wet-behind-the-ears quartet Coldplay prefers a folksy, familiar approach to guitar pop.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    You're going to have to dig through a barrage of radio-ready songs to find the excitement of previous albums.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Neither Brit-pop nor hip-hop, "Gorillaz" contains a motley, dub-influenced collection of songs that are, like Hewlett's drawings, an exercise in sophisticated immaturity
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    High on boyish charm and low on moral fiber, Blink's songs have all the lyrical depth of a whoopee cushion.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Halfway through the album, Michael ruins the good mood with a seemingly endless run of soggy, would-be anthems and self-pitying celebrity complaints.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Despite his always dead-on guitar playing and decent set of pipes, Setzer pens original material that tends toward repetition. Couple that with a rather pedestrian "Mack The Knife"... and "Vavoom!" comes across as listenable, but ultimately forgettable
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    This time around, the Garbage tradition of borrowing from all over the map has produced unfocused and derivative results.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Manson still has the most bloodcurdling scream in rock. But the flat-footed musical backing on "Holy Wood" leaves his delivery sounding strained, like an overburdened star left naked on an empty stage.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    "Forever" is about as glossy as it gets. It's also understandably predictable.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The music is rarely up to the task set by the lyrics. Truly successful union of melody and words occurs only twice—on the sparsely arranged stream of consciousness titled "Bonefields" and on the album's most original piece, "Another Plane Went Down," which teeters beautifully on the edge of dream and reality.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The admittedly catchy, three-chord pop structure isn't as effective as in previous DCFC releases--as a basic approach, it seems more thoughtless than deliberately anaesthetizing this time.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The new Tom Tom Club album is a lot like its title: a pop-culture reference whose impact fades upon inspection.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    It’s way too often here that everything new and interesting about two-step gets brushed aside for suspiciously lite jazz and limp mixes of dancefloor hits.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Unfortunately, Harding misses more than he hits.... musically most of the tracks sound forced and untrue.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    The trio, whose sound could be loosely described as arena rock with a heavy nod to the Seattle flannel era, fail to entice the listener with the requisite hooks and melodies that define great songs.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 38 Critic Score
    Anyone hoping Etheridge has channeled her recent ups and downs into anything resembling vital rock and roll will be disappointed. Instead, she's sticking closer to the middle of the road than ever before.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 38 Critic Score
    Sadly, what should have been a spirited old-school revival feels more like half-baked nostalgia.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 38 Critic Score
    She keeps shifting gears in an ill-advised attempt to please too broad an audience.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 38 Critic Score
    Like the group's previous records, "Turn 21" sticks to a formula based in familiarity—so familiar that one questions the value of this recording.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 25 Critic Score
    The disappointing result is mostly a collection of thin-sounding electronic drum beats and trippy effects that, were it not for Farrell's vocal accompaniment, would be altogether forgettable.