Spin's Scores

  • Music
For 3,348 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 50% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 47% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 2.8 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 69
Highest review score: 100 The Pretty Toney Album
Lowest review score: 0 Noah's Ark
Score distribution:
3,348 music reviews
    • 100 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    An indelible quiet-storm jeremiad.
    • 99 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Tago Mago is the messy one, where ten-minute stretches of nightmare sound effects are followed by 20 minutes of caveman groove with Damo Suzuki's caveman babble to match.
    • 98 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    "Sister Ray" comes across like a medley has so many shifts in speed, volume, and energy that it seems more like a medley than a concentrated take on the White Light/White Heat epic. It's the brightest gem among many in the collection, which consolidates all of the group's many faces into one cohesive opus.
    • 97 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It's practically the entire history of the band crammed into a mock boombox. Designed by bassist Paul Simonon, the set incorporates retrospective essays, reprinted fanzines, a poster, dog tags, stickers, badges, and so forth; die-hard fans have probably sold off their existing Clash collections just to afford it.
    • 97 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    The toughest record ever made by a former mainstream country artist.... If all the songs don't rival her finest work, the arrangements pull them up. [May 2004, p.105]
    • Spin
    • 96 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    This gorgeous 1970 folk-blues masterpiece teams a gnomic songwriter from Leeds with David Bowie's future guitarist (Mick Ronson), and Elton John's future producer (Gus Dudgeon) and string arranger (Paul Buckmaster).
    • 96 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The five-disc set breaks down the album to its building blocks, while the two-CD version provides outtakes and an edit of what the original final product might have been: part tribute, part cartoon, part dream.
    • 95 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Black Messiah has dozens of false starts, short stops, jagged breaks, and backmasked bits. Everything is a little warped. But somehow, the music never falls out of the pocket. And in that commitment to upholding the groove, we find warmth and evidence that we're still moving forward despite the assault on our senses.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Fantasy's production is loud and proud, but also poignant and gripping, always hinting at some looming danger.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's indie rock as hearty and art-free as oatmeal, before the line separating it from the mainstream dissolved, before it became so...eclectic.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Nirvana's headlining gig at the 1992 Reading Festival looms infamously large because of (a) that amazingly creepy photo of Kurt getting wheeled onto the stage looking like Norman Bates' mother, and (b) the show was a mind-blower--sloppy indie rock as stadium-filling psychedelic punk.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Where [Time Out Of Mind] stared down heartbreak and mortality with somber melancholy, Love and Theft finds Dylan taking on those same themes loaded up with piss and vinegar. [Nov 2001, p.127]
    • Spin
    • 93 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Repackaging it all as a six-disc set (including remixes and alternate versions) is pretentious, extravagant, and romantic--U2, after all.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    If you want a "black metal album" that serves dually as make-out music and a loneliness weapon, this is as emo and earnest as it gets.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Though the set's marathon length may keep casual listeners at a distance, fans of the eccentric characters, styles, and emotional arcs that compose Waits' oeuvre know there's no such thing as a "casual" Tom Waits listener anyway. [Dec 2006, p.103]
    • Spin
    • 92 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    The flow is straight-up alien: chilled-out and frantic at the same time, slightly breathless. [Feb 2004, p.95]
    • Spin
    • 92 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Channel ORANGE feels like one long, moonlit, air-conditioned ride.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    They're career musicians active since the '90s, but here, they actually sound excited again.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    This is not garage rock; this is art rock. And that's a compliment. [May 2003, p.107]
    • Spin
    • 91 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The quality of the set rises and falls with the quality of the band, from the formative fusion of soul, rock, and pop on their first three albums to the sudden, exhilarating sound of it all snapping into focus with 1969's Stand! and the gradual turn into 1971's claustrophobic, paranoid There's a Riot Goin' On and the nimble funk of 1973's underrated Fresh. From there, however, it all fell off just as quickly as it had risen, as Sly's genius dissipated in a downward spiral of drugs and delusion.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's a completely exhausting listen, one that might prove easier to admire than enjoy. But at the very least, it's never anything less than fascinating.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Some songs fade out just as they're transforming into something else; others split into several movements, and poetic lyrics psychedelicize hefty topics like war and slavery. Even at 18 tracks, The ArchAndroid feels condensed.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Yet if Johnson seems uninterested in Nashville's warm-and-cuddly act, he agrees with its insistence on crackerjack songcraft, and that keeps The Guitar Song from hardening into tough-guy drudgery.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Sounds as informed by middle-American community theater, church choirs, and John Adams' American operas as any canonical "folk rock" it may resemble. [Jul 2005, p.102]
    • Spin
    • 90 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The money shot is still the original 13-track album, which stridently argues (and proves) the thesis that Uncle Tupelo were the Velvet Underground of '90s alt-country.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Aided by producers Organized Noize and Mr. DJ, Sir Lucious Left Foot is a monster of an album.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Untrue deepens and expands his emotional range. [Feb 2008, p.92]
    • 90 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Z
    In spite of all their stony sonic exploration, they never let Z turn into Zzzz. [Oct 2005, p.133]
    • Spin
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This one is lithe and liquid, shy of a masterwork but still a fucking great record, top to bottom.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    There’s a good balance here: classicist in the Lee Ann Womack neo-countrypolitan sense, yet neither stodgy, frail, nor nostalgic, but rather as thoroughly in tune with modern millennial existence as Taylor Swift.