Spin's Scores

  • Music
For 3,260 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 50% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 47% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 2.9 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 69
Highest review score: 100 Van Lear Rose
Lowest review score: 0 Noah's Ark
Score distribution:
3,260 music reviews
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Like Robert Earl Keen, he has a way with a punch line and the frat-boy fans to prove it--they're gonna love 'America's Favorite Pastime,' which recounts the 1970 no-hitter Dock Ellis pitched on LSD. The rest of us will admire 'Bring 'Em Home,' a spirited call to get our troops the hell out of harm's way.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    They channel experimental noise, acid-drenched riffs, and live-show spontaneity into a record of brilliantly crafted nuggets of lysergic rock that is easily their most consistent effort to date.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    This is not the sound of settling.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Somehow they've upped their jubilation game without making too many sonic changes since 2005's self-titled debut.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Buoyant voices erupt in urgent chants, while xylophones, thumb pianos, and percussion create a swirling, hallucinatory web of sound equal to the freakiest psychedelia. [Oct 2008, p.114]
    • 83 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    It's a set of torch songs to do Nico proud--some folkie, some neo-soul, all darker than your closet at midnight. [Oct 2003, p.113]
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Us
    Happiness hasn’t blunted his keen social insight, though, as he empathizes with latchkey teens (“Tight Rope”), reflects on friends trapped in the street life (“Slippin’ Away”), and rues slavery’s consequences (“The Travelers”).
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Recognizable shapes of jazz and post-rock often accompany Gira's baritone croon, but they're always delivered between passages of fastidiously crafted clamor that's as cauterizing as ever.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The results are even more immersive than the stuttering microhouse rhythms on which he built his reputation originally.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    For maybe the first time, the Evens actually make you miss Fugazi a little bit less.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The enthralling Real Animal presents a concise overview of the man's art and life, encompassing the punk fury of the Nuns, the country-rock twang of Rank and File, the rootsy guitar assault of True Believers, and the late-era tortured, string-quintet balladry that showcases his unbearably sad voice.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Old
    It isn't traditionally enjoyable, and it isn't supposed to be.... It's the most daring record he could've made.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Superchunk clearly trust their music to hold up under all the heaviness of life's big questions, and trust us to hold up, too.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Hospice is packed with lofty choruses and extended instrumental passages (the alternately elegiac and tedious 'Atrophy'). But with emotional drama in abundance (mostly from vocalist Peter Silberman’s fiery, tormented shouts), sonic indulgences like the astral guitar blasts on “Thirteen” offer genuine catharsis.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Game Theory is the Roots at their heaviest. [Sep 2006, p.114]
    • 83 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Isolation Drills' anthems are shamelessly charming, even bashfully moving. [June 2001, p.153]
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    As a sonic experience, Tempest kicks most Dylan albums in the cojones.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Nominal solo debut notwithstanding, Blunderbuss is the sound of a mid-career stride.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Fully formed songs suggest themselves, but too often prematurely dissolve, with vagaries always favored over the tangible.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Amygdala is the most fearless and most accomplished thing he's ever made: a smorgasbord of sonic possibility, a new idea around every corner, each vibrantly alive in a wide sound field.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Open Your Heart improves the band's focus even as it widens its range, ditching the harrowing, hacking-death-cough stuff and reaching for something more.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    What once was a one-man basement project becomes a full band to be reckoned with.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    All Hell throws up no barriers to access--if you have an abiding interest in great stories told by a great new storyteller, it'll welcome you in.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 67 Critic Score
    Idlewild are compelling when they put Woomble's sad-sack lyrics front and center, but on aggressively average rockers like "You Held The World In Your Arms" and "Century After Century," the band's turgid squall swamps his words. [Jun 2003, p.103]
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Obviously, hip-hop loves its thugs, too, especially if they're the antiheroes of a relatively nuanced piece like this one.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Lightest Ono album ever? Probably. Heaviest avant-pop from a 76-year-old mainstream pariah/underground innovator? Hell, yeah!
    • 83 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Skying lacks the urgency of their raucous goth-punk debut Strange House, but the broadly hooky single "Still Life" could fill an arena nicely, and the band actually sound interested enough to entertain the possibility.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Lisbon, like 2008's You & Me, is a gorgeous journey into the elegiac, inspired by the music of Memphis' Sun Studios.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Gang Gang Dance are back to testing boundaries. For them, it's a return to the future.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Rarely has dispiritedness sounded so uplifting. [Mar 2007, p.88]