Spin's Scores

  • Music
For 3,972 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 50% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 47% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 2.5 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 70
Highest review score: 100 To Pimp A Butterfly
Lowest review score: 0 Noah's Ark
Score distribution:
3972 music reviews
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    You’ll discover plenty of laconic beauty wherever you drop into The House, and it glimmers with the songful club music that made its predecessor great for getting ready to go out. But a profusion of digital-pastoral vocal settings makes it unlikely to displace Pool from constant shuffle rotation.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    In lesser hands, all this weight could feel leaden. But Miguel remains a craftsman, and leisure gets its due.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    The failures of his latest effort don’t simply center on that side step from audacity to reckoning. It’s in how that move has somehow left him struggling to write a listenable song.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Songs of Experience, clicks into place more boldly than Songs of Innocence did three years ago. Tempos are alert, riffs punchy, melodies sharp. ... It’s also too bad the album’s second half gets stuck in pensive midtempo mode and never recovers.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Utopia is full-on music-theater unlike anything Björk has yet attempted, and the rare tenth album by such an established artist to genuinely surprise with unforced and meaningful reinvention.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Rest’s intimacy contrasts Gainsbourg’s personal reticence, and softens a storytelling void that might doom a lesser stylist.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Thanks to its polyrhythms and rich instrumental textures, The Animal Spirits is as likely to appeal to fans of experimental rock music (especially electro-tribal searchers like Animal Collective, Gang Gang Dance, Fuck Buttons, or Dan Deacon) as it is to those who regularly spend evenings at the club.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Never has she sounded freer than she does here, a self-styled villain biting the forbidden fruit of gossip and letting its juices run down her neck.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    There are light nods to the times—single “Love So Soft” lightly updates Thankful’s Christina Aguilera-penned “Miss Independent” and Breakaway’s “Walk Away” with a half-time chorus, and tracks like “Didn’t I” and “Heat” recalls Adele’s collaborations with Max Martin. But the rest is stubbornly old-fashioned: sloughing off the flakiness of the millennial male while extolling the virtues of taking it slow and pushing for commitment.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Plunge feel vibrant and more alive. There are crucial moments on the album where Dreijer slows things down a bit to let everything sink in. Even on the quieter moments, however, the mood of the album is deeply human.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The final result is a balm to soothe well-trodden emotional frequencies.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    It’s disappointing, then, that this impulse of creative energy has resulted in a record that feels flat and strained.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Each song is immaculately crafted and sequenced, yet with this many ballads, they blur: a play continually in its eleventh hour.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Ken
    ken, Bejar’s sparest album in terms of lyrical density and length in some time, is an aggressive, well-chiseled shift.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Lotta Sea Lice is strange, occasionally awkward, and easy to love. Like a good buddy movie, it’s a little sentimental, and possessed of a deeper wisdom than its goofy premise initially lets on.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Clark has carved out a space as a guitar hero in an era where that sort of thing is supposed to be over. That is impressive, even if the theatrics occasionally wear me out, and begin to feel like preludes for a visually dynamic live show. I’m much more attracted to MASSEDUCTION’s humbler moments, when you can better imagine the songs without the heavy arrangements.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It’s largely a plainspoken, cohesive work, closer in spirit to single-minded efforts like Morning Phases, Modern Guilt, or even Sea Change. And really, that’s fine.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    HEAVN is musically spry and spiritually hefty at 41 minutes, the questioning half of a nationally fraught Q&A that’s long deserved the answers, none of whom are currently running for president.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Like all of Four Tet’s work, New Energy can be viewed as an addition to this unlikely canon, whose practitioners share a desire to remove a listener from their surroundings and bring them someplace higher, no matter the means.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Kelela proudly stands within the genre’s tradition. For the most part, she avoids making any grandstanding romantic or political statements, but Take Me Apart finds its purpose within the subdued complexities.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    The final result is an agreeable enough listen.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Remarkably, Bates captures outsized bombast while infusing the music with a genuine energy that verges on punk. Manson’s music hasn’t sounded this alive in years, which makes it so disappointing that he squanders a golden opportunity. ... Manson sounds increasingly out of touch and desperate to preserve a persona that he and his audience should have outgrown a long time ago.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Though energetic, their danceable chassis and sprawling melodies nevertheless feel weary, as if constantly grinding against some looming, countervailing force. It’s true that wearied, furtive anthems have always been Wolf Parade’s thing, but they feel especially right for these enervating times.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Where her past albums felt messy but painfully sincere, Younger Now comes off as safe and overly sanitized, with the frisson that made Cyrus a star all but entirely blasted away. ... Still, the album has some plainly good songs.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    While mediating the difference between bitterness and hooks was such a hallmark of past releases, it feels good to hear them find catharsis here, even if it’s in small doses.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Wonderful Wonderful is the Killers’ strongest statement since 2005, a more than okay affirmation of their power to keep a global audience.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The dreamy project leaves the snide social critiques and radicalisms to the wayside for 36 minutes that feel of its own realm, where the dichotomies and bodily desire feel self-contained. The intimacy is never lost within the set’s high concept: For an album centered on lonesomeness, Aromanticism feels warm.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Three Futures is a slow burn, but Torres doesn’t require speed, not when she can hold our attention with something more akin to intense eye contact.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Taken together, Cold Dark Place affirms the band’s pursuit of technically ambitious rock with high production value, while continuing to disrupt traditional notions of genre and song structure.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    It’s too long, and large parts of it are corny or forgettable, but in the context of Macklemore as a pop musician--and not a rapper--it doubles down on his strengths: well-crafted, sincere verses about his personal experiences combined with a better hook, usually provided by someone else.