Spin's Scores

  • Music
For 3,518 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 50% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 47% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 2.7 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 69
Highest review score: 100 Our Endless Numbered Days
Lowest review score: 0 Noah's Ark
Score distribution:
3,518 music reviews
    • 84 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    [Franz Ferdinand's] Alex Kapranos... owes JK crooner Paul Haig a pint. [Dec 2006, p.103]
    • Spin
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The real magic of Currents, though, is in how Parker so effectively (and genuinely, for the most part) manipulates the listener’s emotions without necessarily revealing any himself.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The real orchestration is in Beam's voice, a sigh so angelic it masks the religious turmoil within. [Oct 2007, p.106]
    • Spin
    • 84 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Sound[s] like Prince cutting the ass out of Squarepusher's pants. [Aug 2005, p.103]
    • Spin
    • 84 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    It's hard to think of another post-hardcore lifer whose return to active duty is so high-five worthy.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Second Hand Heart is a whisker less awesome, but in the last month only Earl Sweatshirt’s album could match its acerbic brevity.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Tennant and Lowe's rueful melodies and vocals dilute the euphoria. Classic Pet Shop Boys, in other words.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Like art, Vampires is dense; like pop, it seems to float in effortlessly from some place you're sure you've been, but by some trick of déjà vu eludes your conscious brain.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Preposterous and sensational, We Love Life grapples with nothing less than how best to prove you're alive. [Oct 2002, p.116]
    • Spin
    • 84 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Finds these thoughtful Brits exploring even more emotional territory. [Mar 2004, p.96]
    • Spin
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Exchanging their volatile tendencies for restraint and focus, Godspeed You! Black Emperor have created another incredible work and one that finds them again evading the confines of formula--even if it happens to be their own.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Gone are the prior albums' "tasteful" (i.e., boring) slow-burners; El Camino's 38 minutes are pure thrust.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Dream River flows from one track to the next, with a similarity of tempo that makes it play like eight movements of one 40-minute song. But a few moments stand out.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Pompadoured George Taylor Jr. has more than enough melodic grace and pretty-boy swag to nail the sound.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    There's still something small and handmade about the Thermals' music. [Sep 2006, p.112]
    • Spin
    • 84 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The aptly titled Wake Up the Nation hardly feels like a nostalgia trip; in the taut, two-minute boogie-punk number "Fast Car/Slow Traffic," Weller could be describing himself in relation to his heritage-rock peers.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    ESG's DIY tracks have a raw, unfinished feel--echo-drenched vocals buried deep in the mix, jagged hen-scratch guitar, taut bass lines as infectious as mononucleosis, and reverberating layers of percussion... The group's 1981 debut single, "Moody"... is one of the funkiest songs ever recorded. [Sep 2000, p.181]
    • Spin
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    A near-masterpiece of magical sounds that are both familiar and wildly new, a stunning blend of classic Americana and classical orchestration.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Inches compiles them all, from the high-voltage shriekathon "Blackouts on Thursday" to "Hold on to Your Genre," where a churning bass line meets shimmery guitar worthy of a new-wave Edge. [Jun 2004, p.108]
    • Spin
    • 84 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The songs on The Letting Go that flirt with familiar forms... feel completely devoid of his pretentious tendencies. [Oct 2006, p.94]
    • Spin
    • 84 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    UGK 4 Life is a fitting capper to this Texas duo's storied career--nothing groundbreaking, just funky, rough-hewn, celebratory tracks.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Marion's approach varies, but his surprisingly soulful songs consistently connect, a significant feat considering we only hear his voice through a Fender.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The self-production here is a bit murky, maybe, and the drums and vocals have seen sharper days. But these dudes still turn sharp corners.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    They're still wildly unpredictable--and still committed to not singing in English--but the dichotomy between the adrenaline rushes and chill-out moments seems a bit more purposeful.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Thanks to its introspective depth, it's equally well suited to solitary listening, the rare mix that connects dance music's public sphere--joyous, communal, kinetic, chaotic--with a more private kind of rapture.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Like Robert Earl Keen, he has a way with a punch line and the frat-boy fans to prove it--they're gonna love 'America's Favorite Pastime,' which recounts the 1970 no-hitter Dock Ellis pitched on LSD. The rest of us will admire 'Bring 'Em Home,' a spirited call to get our troops the hell out of harm's way.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    They channel experimental noise, acid-drenched riffs, and live-show spontaneity into a record of brilliantly crafted nuggets of lysergic rock that is easily their most consistent effort to date.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    This is not the sound of settling.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Somehow they've upped their jubilation game without making too many sonic changes since 2005's self-titled debut.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Buoyant voices erupt in urgent chants, while xylophones, thumb pianos, and percussion create a swirling, hallucinatory web of sound equal to the freakiest psychedelia. [Oct 2008, p.114]