Splendid's Scores

  • Music
For 793 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 65% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 33% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 2.6 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 74
Highest review score: 100 Welcome Interstate Managers
Lowest review score: 10 Fire
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 20 out of 793
793 music reviews
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    This is a solid (and yes, more polished) effort, not likely to disappoint their ardent fans, and I expect that it will draw many new listeners to the band's somber world.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The downside here will be fairly obvious to anyone familiar with Thirlwell's previous output. While Flow's integration of big band jazz and other "external" musical styles is some of Thirlwell's most accomplished work to date -- creditable not only to better technology, but to the growth of his already respectable skills as a conventional composer -- its thematic elements remain the same.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    This is an album about technology, albeit not in the typical sense. While it wears the trappings of loungecore retro-futurism and new wave simplicity, The Geometrid has more to do with the "warmth" of technology and the increasingly essential comforts it provides.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Though not as darkly elegant as Permutation, Supermodified is still rife with sophisticated Brazilian lounge-jazz samples and unpredictable drum'n'bass skitterings, this time augmented with more overt nods to hip-hop and Aphex Twin-style sympho-electronica.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Plays Music sounds like stuff you've heard before, but there's a special, vibrant joy between its notes.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    If you've ever enjoyed an Arling & Cameron record, reveled in overtaxing your speakers with Big Beats or enjoyed the more anthemic, production-intensive side of hip-hop, Super Sound is for you. Not every record in your collection needs to be a ground-breaking, classification-defining, intellectual agenda-toting classic.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Like a comfortable old Pink Floyd album, this is the kind of thing to listen to while floating in space.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Although its quality and creativity never falter, as Fugu 1 goes on it becomes a little redundant.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    EMOH is a bit rambling, and could stand to lose a song or two so as to not detract from the its power, but considering Barlow's sometimes egregious prolificacy, these 14 songs are about as polished as he gets.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Push the Button isn't wall-to-wall brilliant; it has its share of lulls and, for want of a better term, dubious inspirations. However, when it works, it's so on that you won't want to turn it off.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    It's complex, deeply melodic, carefully arranged and (for the most part) very satisfying.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Effortlessly charming and strangely compelling, despite moments of complete and utter unlistenability.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Peopled with starry-eyed lovers and draped in wistful melancholy, it brilliantly captures that lonely netherworld between love and loss.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Outside Closer is maddeningly indirect, and the diminishing returns of its final minutes might make you wonder why you invested the time in the first place. But honestly, how many albums can claim to have so palpable an effect?
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Dignity and Shame is sparse and vulnerable, showcasing nothing but Bachmann's bittersweet musings and his deep growl of a voice. It is by no means a unique album, but it's an effective one.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    You won't necessarily encounter anything substantially removed from their prior work, but you will witness the duo allowing new voices to assume a greater role in rocketing each song to some bright red futon in a distant region of the cosmos.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Usually entertaining, often thought-provoking, and occasionally insightful.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Sure, Hersh could be your mom, but only if your mom routinely blows out big stacks of Marshall amps.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Origin Vol. I rocks pretty hard without asking much of listeners; it's difficult to be disappointed in a record that's so clearly joyful and energetic.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Let Them Drink may not be as accessible to the mainstream as the band might have hoped, but The Capitol Years' updated blend of classic sounds is an addictive and refreshing change.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Listening to frontmen Jason Hill and Brian Kareig chop-up every '60s and '70s rock 'n' roll cliché, remorselessly blending Iggy, Mick, Bowie, Marc Bolan and Johnny Rotten into a light, frothy frappé of sex, violence and coked-up come-ons is, at the very least, consistently amusing -- and even better, surprisingly tasty.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Don't look to Open Season to get your heart pounding or your blood flowing; it trades in less cathartic experiences.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The 90 degree turns between tracks are endearing, like a cool mix-tape -- not cause for head scratching and folded arms.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Making the effort to unravel the tightly packed layers and unconventional (even by 'Lab standards) song structures can seem downright daunting, regardless of how long you've been following Sadier and how many of her EPs you've devoured.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    It's all very sweeping, operatic and inviting.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The remaining songs are uniformly well crafted, but they aren't necessarily going to please the people who come looking for more of the old "Jerk It Out" magic.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    For all his skillful sampling and solid lyrics, Blueprint hasn't broken any new ground with 1988, which just underscores the troubling tendency of underground art forms to become more like the mainstream as they age.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The songs on Fallen Leaf Pages are all played at roughly the same glacial pace and share a very mellow, thoughtful and regret-filled vibe. Some listeners will find them repetitive, even tedious.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Let There Be Morning isn't designed to bowl you over with its size and scope; rather, it's a quietly compelling, lushly orchestrated affair that slowly but surely melts its way into your heart.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The impromptu feel is often charming and sometimes campy, but always sincere.