St. Louis Post-Dispatch's Scores

  • Movies
For 1,029 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 64% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 33% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 6.2 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 68
Highest review score: 100 Red Riding Trilogy
Lowest review score: 25 Marmaduke
Score distribution:
1,029 movie reviews
  1. Waiting for Superman raises important questions while wearing a big red heart on its chest, but inconvenient facts are its kryptonite.
  2. Two incompatible movies duke it out in Bandslam. Although it's the wimpy teen musical that prevails, it's the misfit coming-of-age story that leaves an impression.
  3. Weaving between freshness and formula, The Boys Are Back earns a gentle pat on the head.
  4. The crescendo of two resonant careers makes the false notes of Unfinished Song forgivable.
  5. Presented as a stand-alone film, but without an explanation for the protagonist’s physical and emotional injuries, it’s a head-scratcher. As with Joe’s sexual compulsion, scratching can’t cure the itch.
  6. A buddy comedy disguised as a political thriller. It’s full of malarkey, but as a campaign of shock and awe, it’s hard to resist.
  7. The rapid dialogue is dry and mannered, like a David Mamet play, there's virtually no story and Cronenberg's visual scheme is cold and claustrophobic.
  8. Director Philipp Stolzl worked in the same dangerous conditions as the original climbers, and we can feel the chill and peril in our bones. It's a shame, then, that the screenwriter, unlike the camera crew and the characters, was afflicted with such timidity.
  9. It's a calculated crowd-pleaser that skims over the surface of the era like a cruise-ship production of "American Graffiti."
  10. As much Fosse as Fellini. It’s a shadow of a shadow, refracted through a fun-house mirror. For all the noise and color, it feels like an exercise and not a natural expression.
  11. It's a little black dress of a movie, an elegant hint of something sensual that is ultimately denied to us.
  12. Every character from the original is here, navigating the dating jungle, but this time there’s no pushing of Steve Harvey’s book.
  13. Despite its brainy title, Monsters University only earns a passing grade on its looks.
  14. For real balance, the debate needs fiercely leftist truth-tellers in tri-corner hats, calling themselves the Organic Chai Tea Party.
  15. There’s much to appreciate here. Like “The Perks of Being a Wallflower,” which had a stronger sense of its place in the world, this coming-of-age movie should appeal to smart, sensitive young people who haven’t been exposed to the better examples of the genre.
  16. Whether on stage or the screen, Much Ado About Nothing is a pleasure that passes like a midsummer night’s dream.
  17. Watson is a revelation here as a brand-obsessed bad girl.
  18. Targeted toward horror-film junkies looking for a terror throwback, You’re Next mixes gore and dark humor with yet another home invasion plot line.
  19. A bizarre buffet of buffoonery, brutality and beautiful landscapes.
  20. As a diversion, Babies is like a wind-up toy that will tickle anyone with a pulse. As a documentary, it's like a cache of home videos that will frustrate anyone with an inquiring mind.
  21. Like Ernest Borgnine, Philip Seymour Hoffman is an unconventional leading man with an Oscar on his mantle, and his bittersweet Jack Goes Boating has elicited comparisons with "Marty."
    • 48 Metascore
    • 63 Critic Score
    What saves the movie from taking a nose-dive is the confident performance of Helena Bonham Carter and some genuinely funny scenes involving her character. She plays Jane, a smart, feisty, rebellious young woman who is confined to a wheelchair because she is dying of ALS (Lou Gehrig's disease). [22 Jan. 1999, p.E3]
    • St. Louis Post-Dispatch
  22. Prince of Persia is woven of recycled fibers, but by the slipping standards of summertime entertainment, it's a magic carpet ride.
  23. Typically lovely to look at, with big-eyed young people espousing high ideals amid natural splendor. But outside of their bubble, a prickly history looms, and Miyazaki’s dubious attitude toward the wartime role of his hero makes the movie a mixed blessing.
  24. The Equalizer, loosely based on the TV series of the late ’80s, is a guilty-pleasure platform for Washington’s slow-cooked, kick-butt heroism.
  25. A good and necessary film, but like the man himself it’s not immune to scrutiny.
  26. There aren't enough surprises to justify the title, but The Switch produces sufficient light for a late-summer diversion.
  27. Jeunet -- whose influence can be seen in everything from the short-lived TV series "Pushing Daisies" to the Oscar-winning film "The Curious Case of Benjamin Button" -- remains one of the world's most imaginative directors. But Micmacs is a misfire.
  28. A serviceable behind-the-scenes tour documentary with about as much insight as a talk-show monologue.
  29. The spoof of consumerism scores some predictable points, but the tidy ending is a sell-out to the ultimate marketing machine: Hollywood.

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