St. Louis Post-Dispatch's Scores

For 464 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 62% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 35% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 2.3 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 68
Highest review score: 100 Better Things: Season 1
Lowest review score: 0 Black Box: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 324
  2. Negative: 0 out of 324
324 tv reviews
  1. People who like procedurals will enjoy playing along. But the real charm of the series--as in a lot of cable originals--is in its ensemble.
  2. Endeavour is most interesting for the light it sheds on the character development of young Morse.
  3. The Season 4 premiere is solid in most ways.
  4. The writing is smart, the characters are amusing, the cameos (including one from Bill Murray, and another from Stephen Colbert as himself) are entertaining, and the political commentary is as pointed as you might suspect.
  5. A show that is beautiful and sweet, funny and touching.
  6. Loch Ness might not be pure noir, but it’s enjoyable noir light.
  7. It's dark and funny and appalling and sad and silly, and very much its own thing.
  8. Fans of 24 are likely to go all in on Live Another Day. But what if you didn’t watch the original? Will you be lost? I’d say maybe, although there are always long stretches of 24 in which everyone is pretty much lost.
  9. Its real appeal should be to viewers who like their TV history entertainingly out there.
  10. JFK assassination conspiracy theorists won’t be disappointed with King’s whodunit premise in “11/22/63,” although they might argue with it. Likewise, the miniseries has something for fans of science fiction, romance and thrillers in general.
  11. Apparent familiarity doesn’t make The Night Of any less involving, though, in large part because of Ahmed’s charismatic and sympathetic performance as Naz.
  12. The format is ambitious, and if some parts don’t entirely work, there’s still a lot to like and learn in Mars.
  13. Bessie, with a gorgeous soundtrack performed largely by Latifah, tells this story in far less simplistic fashion. Rees dramatizes Smith’s demons in powerful, sometimes chaotic fashion, jumping back in time to show her as an abused child and depicting her adult life in vignettes that don’t always flow together.
  14. This sunny and touching yarn feels like just what we need in these angst-ridden days.
  15. It's worth giving Revolution a shot for its surprising imagery (wait till you see what's become of the Gateway Arch in an early scene), strong adult characters and fascinating possibilities.
  16. Director Ezra Edelman weaves many voices into a thoughtful slice of American social history, examining the volatile subject of race via intense focus on an athlete so elite, he believed he transcended color. ... If there is a weakness in O.J.: Made in America, it's that the unspooling of the murder trial will feel too familiar, especially for anyone who just watched "The People v. O.J. Simpson."
  17. The decision to have some students graduate was a smart one, and splitting the action between New York (where Lea Michele's Rachel Berry is attending NYADA, the New York Academy of Dramatic Arts) and Ohio (where the remaining members of New Directions are regrouping) turns out to have been even smarter.
  18. Beyond its off-putting title, this is the freshest, wackiest romantic comedy/musical fantasy hybrid of this or any recent season.
  19. Based on its completely riveting pilot, Blindspot might have earned four stars if there were any way to judge what it was going to be.
  20. The Flash pilot, directed by David Nutter, is full of thrilling special effects, too. That adds up to a show that, at least in the early going, has something for almost everyone.
  21. The outline of Striking Out is familiar enough that it might sound like an American show, probably airing Thursday nights on ABC. But there is nothing cliched about either the execution or the performances.
  22. If you're expecting Quantico to be another "Grey's Anatomy," you could be disappointed.
  23. A smart and funny series.
  24. Action and the beginning of character development are both good signs.
  25. This isn't a workplace drama with flying, though; a dark back story soon surfaces that could raise the stakes.
  26. Bates Motel builds psychological scares rather than spooking us with haunted-house cliches. Following these characters to the end we can see coming should be a fascinating journey.
  27. Different and complicated, The Slap feels like something viewers might flock to on cable or Netflix.
  28. Helix is very involving, giving us characters to care about even in the midst of so much necessary setup.
  29. Complications, and they are many, ensue.
  30. [A] dark and fascinating drama.
  31. Thanks to the clever writing and a very appealing performance by Gummer, this is one of my favorites of the fall season.
  32. Its origins [British-French co-production] make Spotless more thoughtful and more deliberately paced than a comparable U.S. show might be. There is dark humor along with the drama, and entertaining action as well.
  33. Most impressively, Saints & Strangers allows the Native Americans to speak in their own languages, with subtitles. That alone makes the miniseries as realistic as any depiction of the Plymouth Colony seen on screen.
  34. There's action, wit and dry humor, and some entertaining if not dazzling special effects. Again accessibly, most episodes will be stand-alone, with an underlying mythology to ramp up the stakes.
  35. Derivative? True fans of the genre are likely to think so, but that familarity makes the entry point into Badlands easier for the average viewer. So does a beautiful, ballet-like opening fight scene in which Sunny gracefully takes out a horde of enemies not nearly so well-dressed as he is.
  36. With a running time of under two hours, it has no room for the detail or nuance, let alone the humor, that made “The People v. O.J.” so addictive. But Confirmation succeeds in making us re-examine attitudes from the vantage point of a quarter century, and also in reminding us that politics is an ugly business.
  37. The characters in Claws initially seem like clichés, including Desna, who is very much the familiar big-busted broad in high heels and hot pants. Before the first hour is over, though, we see them differently.
  38. Grantchester always goes down as easily as a cup of sweet and milky tea.
  39. The structure of Big Little Lies, virtually identical to that of the novel, makes getting into it a chore. ... Gorgeously shot, neatly directed and beautifully acted from start to finish, Big Little Lies is an achievement in almost every way.
  40. The Dovekeepers is beautifully written and acted, without a whiff of the hokey melodrama so unfortunately common in period pieces, especially those with biblical themes.
  41. Nobody is likely to remember Murder in the First 18 years from now, as TV aficionados do "Murder One." But viewers who want to watch a mystery unfold and follow the twists and turns without having to sweat it should be more than satisfied.
  42. The Librarians is a charming, engaging addition to the roster of new cable series.
  43. By the end of the first episode, who’s who and what’s what have begun to sort themselves out, and Turn looks like a series that will be absorbing to follow for its characters, not just its action.
  44. More thought-provoking than the typical current sitcom and with more laughs per half-hour than most, The Carmichael Show deserves more than a short summer run.
  45. A series like Chance seems natural for binge watching, and that makes Hulu's strategy of releasing episodes week by week, just like on television, seem frustrating. Fans of psychological thrillers, though, are likely to find Chance worth the wait.
  46. Just when you're smirking at Empire, it reaches out and hooks you.
  47. One show isn't much of a test of what Corden's Late Late will be. But the premiere certainly suggests that fun is ahead.
  48. After disliking the show initially, I've now seen the first three episodes, and I've come around. Despite its flaws, The Office is a smart, subversive change from most TV comedy. With so many trite and predictable -- and generally unfunny -- sitcoms around, one that's different deserves a chance. Or two or three. [24 Mar 2005, p.F8]
    • St. Louis Post-Dispatch
  49. Leeves is a hoot as Daphne, and provides leavening to Mahoney's self-centered gruffness. This could all work out, I guess; these characters (except possibly Dad) could grow on us, and in the post-"Seinfeld" time slot, they're likely to get a chance. [16 Sept 1993, p.6G]
    • St. Louis Post-Dispatch
  50. Hugh Laurie is cranky, scathingly honest, brilliant Dr. Gregory House, whose amazing diagnostic abilities almost make up for his abrasive personality, in the Fox medical drama House. [16 Nov 2004, p.E06]
    • St. Louis Post-Dispatch
  51. Always messy, often rude, sometimes poignant and frequently annoying, Popular is - come to think of it - a lot like teen-agers themselves. And that just could make it the most authentic high school series of the year. [28 Sept 1999, p.D6]
    • St. Louis Post-Dispatch
  52. Absorbing as the show promises to be, Sunday night's opener is something of a disappointment because it basically rewrites the Martha Moxley murder case, the details of which are very familiar from the recent Michael Skakel trial. [28 Sept 2003, p.C5]
    • St. Louis Post-Dispatch
  53. It's a refreshing change, though, to see competitions based on mental achievement and eliminations based on merit, not whim. [8 Jan 2004]
    • St. Louis Post-Dispatch
  54. In all, Noah's first Daily Show was a solid success, and funnier than skeptics probably expected.
  55. Even at its meanest, "South Park" is seldom mean-spirited, and it's often outrageously funny. [13 Aug 1997]
    • St. Louis Post-Dispatch
  56. Relax and go with the goofiness and you could have a good time. [9 Jan 1996]
    • St. Louis Post-Dispatch
  57. So far, so good. [6 Oct 2000, p.D7]
    • St. Louis Post-Dispatch
  58. Lighthearted lessons are learned all around. It's all very sweet. [20 Sept 1996, p.10E]
    • St. Louis Post-Dispatch
  59. Sweet and whimsical. [12 Jan 1997]
    • St. Louis Post-Dispatch
  60. It's hospital drama in the "St. Elsewhere" mold - but, so far, with less humor. [18 Sep 1994]
    • St. Louis Post-Dispatch
  61. The writing, which draws heavily on Carey's stand-up act, is often funny, with wry comments about life's absurdities. [13 Sep 1995]
    • St. Louis Post-Dispatch
  62. Jimmy Fallon welcomed viewers to his Tonight Show Monday, introducing himself as "your host--for now." That was about as edgy as Fallon got on his first show, which seemed designed to reassure fans of Jay Leno that Tonight wouldn't change too much, while also giving "Late Night" followers some of the bits they enjoyed on Fallon's old show.
  63. The quality of the material, all of which is written by the performers themselves, is spotty, to be sure. But when it hits, it has that "on the edge" feeling that makes you squirm as much as it makes you laugh. [21 July 1989, p.9E]
    • St. Louis Post-Dispatch
  64. As funny as it ought to be. [28 Mar 1999]
    • St. Louis Post-Dispatch
  65. In addition to the laughs (and Spade, in appropriately small doses, is especially funny), the opener of "Just Shoot Me" includes a touching scene between father and daughter that gives us the necessary understanding for both these characters. [4 Mar 1997]
    • St. Louis Post-Dispatch
  66. The absence of the familiar law-order yin-yang gives the spin-off its own identity, but in the beginning it feels like a loss...What may turn out to sink this sharply written, well-acted show, however, is the premise itself. The prospect of tuning in every week to confront a creepy new sex crime, with most of the victims women and children, simply isn't very appealing. [20 Sept 1999, p.E6]
    • St. Louis Post-Dispatch
  67. Vikings is full of fighting, impaling, beheading and all that fun stuff. The hope is clearly to draw "Game of Thrones" fans, but it's not that good.
  68. Two later episodes parody the TV series "Vice" and "Nanook of the North," the 1922 silent film credited with launching the documentary genre. Both are well done, and each has a twist. Each also has an awful lot of Hader and Armisen in costume, so take that as an endorsement or as a caution, depending on your feeling about them. I didn't laugh, but maybe you will.
  69. Defiance wants to be that crossover science-fiction show that appeals both to true believers and general audiences. If "Terra Nova," which aimed for that same ground, didn't succeed, I can't see "Defiance" doing it either.
  70. When Thandie Newton is on screen in Rogue, it's tough to look away.... Other than Newton, though, Rogue is a disappointment in the early going, more tedious than thrilling.
  71. They are quirky--cookie-cutter quirky. But for summer TV drama, that's not the worst they could be.
  72. Young & Hungry is nicely paced, and even in the first episode, the humor is character-driven. It's as uncomplicated, and tasty, as a good grilled cheese.
  73. Season 2 of True Detective is as slow as molasses, and just as dark, in its first hours.
  74. If people who grew up with the Muppets and consider them virtually sacred reject this new incarnation, that leaves casual fans--and kids. Is this a show for kids? Not really, but despite some mild talk about Muppet sex lives, there doesn't seem to be a real reason that children can't watch. Whether that audience can keep a much-ballyhooed but far from perfect new show afloat is unclear.
  75. Although the premiere is funny, succeeding episodes (two will air each week) hit the same quirk-centric jokes pretty hard.
  76. Getting On is for mature audiences only, with uncensored language and outrageous behavior all around. If you like comedy with more cringes than chuckles, Getting On could be for you.
  77. Madoff proves too slippery for clear characterization, even for the combined talents of Levinson and De Niro, and the result is a film that is dull, with bursts of weird.
  78. I'm not sure the mild-mannered but eternally stressed Blais and the big-ego Vigneron were the best choices for the premiere, though. The whole affair is a tiny bit bland.
  79. This Odd Couple, starring Matthew Perry as messy Oscar Madison and Thomas Lennon as fastidious Felix Unger, just feels forced, tired and not funny enough.
  80. The more it settles down, the better it gets, although "better" remains relative.
  81. It breaks absolutely no new ground, but it's lively, fast-paced and enjoyable enough, if you like this sort of thing.
  82. It will undoubtedly seem tame to staunch "True Blood" fans. But a few winks of humor and some good scares make Midnight, Texas more than you'd expect from a summer series on broadcast TV.
  83. It does what it sets out to do: that is, adapt the book faithfully and still make an entertaining film.
  84. These days, it’s hard to be too certain about anything, but 24 is reassuringly still the series it always has been.
  85. Extreme, yes. But that's what makes it an experiment we might want to watch.
  86. Viewers may be attracted to Backstrom because of its charming supporting players as much as its abrasive hero. The whole thing grew on me in the course of three episodes provided for preview.
  87. The cases often seem more obvious than intriguing; the emotions feel forced; much of the dialogue is trite. The cast is unusually diverse, and that's worthy of high praise.
  88. Many jokes are barely smile-worthy, and the show still feels broad and sitcom-y, despite its single-camera format. Sometimes, Lopez seems to be recycling lines from his stand-up act. But it's another step forward for TV Land.
  89. Slow and mournful, The Returned is interesting but not, in the early going, enormously compelling.
  90. Indian Summers, created and written by Paul Rutman, is great to look at, and intriguing, but the storytelling is so deliberately opaque that the plot is hard to follow.
  91. Loud and silly as it is, the show also manages to create and define its characters skillfully.
  92. To see its potential, you'll have to grit your teeth through a lot of painful moments early on.
  93. Frankly, based on two episodes, Game of Silence doesn't seem to be worth the effort required to sort out its twisted plotting. However, it's clearly the kind of show that could suck in viewers who enjoy trying to solve a TV mystery, the more twisted the better.
  94. The dark humor and bursts of bloody action will satisfy some viewers, but the pacing is so leisurely and the characters are such sad sacks that Get Shorty can feel like a chore.
  95. Historical re-enactments almost always seem cheesy, especially when accompanied by a soaring score and melodramatic narration (by Josh Brolin). But these are arguably better than most.
  96. The first episode of Tyrant, the only one I've seen, is both exotic (the cultural elements surrounding the wedding are fascinating) and unfortunately trite, to the point of embracing stereotypes about the Middle East that some early viewers have found offensive.
  97. Another Period won't be to everyone's taste, but at least it knows it's a spoof and gleefully embraces the genre.
  98. In the end, even if you've seen if before, Ring of Fire is a better than average Lifetime movie that will leave viewers hand-clapping, singing along and maybe sniffling a little.
  99. The characters are well-enough developed in the early going.... As the story deepens, though, it also becomes so complicated that it threatens to squeeze out marginal fans of the genre.
  100. Lucifer is the most accessible [of the twoshows--the other being Syfy's "The Magicians"], mostly because it feels as if we've already seen it before. And we have, one way or another; "Lucifer" feels a bit as if Syfy's fallen-angel drama "Dominion" mated with ABC's "Castle."

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