St. Louis Post-Dispatch's Scores

For 433 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 61% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 36% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 1.9 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 67
Highest review score: 100 Joan of Arcadia: Season 1
Lowest review score: 0 Tucker: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 297
  2. Negative: 0 out of 297
297 tv reviews
  1. A quirky mix of light and dark, humor and grit, sentiment and substance -- "The O.C." if scripted by Raymond Chandler. [21 Sept 2004, p.E1]
    • St. Louis Post-Dispatch
  2. Together, they're TV's Cute and Quirky Couple of the Year. Speaking of cute and quirky - Dharma & Greg sometimes tries a little too hard to be both. But mainly, it's delightful. [24 Sept 1997, p.8E]
    • St. Louis Post-Dispatch
    • 80 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    A fascinating and disturbing vision. [21 Mar 2004, p.F5]
    • St. Louis Post-Dispatch
  3. Endeavour is most interesting for the light it sheds on the character development of young Morse.
  4. From the start, this 2015 Project Greenlight is both educational and completely entertaining. This is a show that was more than worth reviving.
  5. Leeves is a hoot as Daphne, and provides leavening to Mahoney's self-centered gruffness. This could all work out, I guess; these characters (except possibly Dad) could grow on us, and in the post-"Seinfeld" time slot, they're likely to get a chance. [16 Sept 1993, p.6G]
    • St. Louis Post-Dispatch
  6. It's hospital drama in the "St. Elsewhere" mold - but, so far, with less humor. [18 Sep 1994]
    • St. Louis Post-Dispatch
  7. Better Things is really about relationships between mothers and daughters, poignant and frustrating and human and hilarious. At telling that story, it's the best.
  8. Even if we find ourselves a bit lost, though, as we might early on in Season 2, there are many rewards in Orphan Black that have nothing to do with its mythology.
  9. The premise may sound more sad than funny, but fortunately, it's not. That's due in large part to Fowler, who like his character has cerebral palsy and is anything but pitiful. Both are smart and funny and determined to be their own person, no matter the obstacles.
  10. The twists that follow are many, and to reveal even one would be giving away too much. But be assured that The Witness for the Prosecution is fascinating, maddening and ultimately heartbreaking.
  11. Once it relaxes, however, Scrubs turns out to be a thoughtful show that has dispensed with a laugh track and proves amusing enough not to need one. (Now, let's dispense with those fantasies.) Shot with a single camera in a former hospital, it aims for the exaggerated realism and the light-meets-dark tone of "M*A*S*H" -- a worthy ambition even if it doesn't get there. [2 Oct 2001, p.F1]
    • St. Louis Post-Dispatch
  12. Yes, One Day at a Time is old-school enough to shoot live, with multiple cameras, but it's not one of those joke-punchline sitcoms in which everyone pauses while the audience cheers. Instead, we feel as if we're watching real people, who may fight noisily but come back together out of love.
  13. Its origins [British-French co-production] make Spotless more thoughtful and more deliberately paced than a comparable U.S. show might be. There is dark humor along with the drama, and entertaining action as well.
  14. With only a single episode available for preview, it's difficult to gauge what Esmail will do with that time and how much Slater (in the pilot, a goofy oddball) will alter the tone. But fans of smart thrillers, and tortured heroes, will want to stick around to find out.
  15. Superb characterizations and riveting action are leavened by wry humor, making Deutschland delightfully addictive.
  16. Joan of Arcadia is smart, entertaining and never heavy-handed, one of the season's best. [26 Sept 2003, p.E8]
    • St. Louis Post-Dispatch
  17. Beyond its off-putting title, this is the freshest, wackiest romantic comedy/musical fantasy hybrid of this or any recent season.
  18. Braugher is such a riveting actor, with so much going on behind his eyes, that he'd probably be interesting reading a list of school closings on the first snow day. [10 Oct 2000, p.F1]
    • St. Louis Post-Dispatch
  19. Manhattan is in other class entirely, the kind of series that is so good, it lifts a network into a whole new tier. What “Mad Men” did for AMC, Manhattan could do for WGN.
  20. It’s terrific. How you respond to it, though, may depend on your mindset as you come into the show. Don’t lower your expectations; dismiss them altogether.
  21. UnREAL is clearly exaggerated for shock value, but it somehow feels more true to life than those "happily ever after" love stories the originals serve up.
  22. The Season 4 premiere is solid in most ways.
  23. The Good Place takes off in absurd, insane and delightful directions, with episodes so rich in asides and throwaway bits that they might need to be watched more than once.
  24. Bryan Dykstra was excellent as LBJ in the Rep’s solid production, but the movie, directed by Jay Roach, is almost a different animal, both intimate and broad, giddily exuberant and deeply dark. A bonus: On film, we hear every witty and/or disturbing line.
  25. The Americans isn't just a heart-pounding action drama; by presenting heroes who are also villains, it also confronts viewers with TV's deepest moral dilemma since "The Sopranos."
  26. This is a comedy. And it’s a good one, warm and charming, genuinely funny, and also odd enough to come from Tina Fey and writing partner Robert Carlock.
  27. Sneaky Pete is less weird [than Netflix's "Lemony Snicket's A Series of Unfortunate Events"] but still wonderful.
  28. Involving, enjoyable TV. [5 Oct 1999, p.D6]
    • St. Louis Post-Dispatch
  29. This sunny and touching yarn feels like just what we need in these angst-ridden days.

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