St. Louis Post-Dispatch's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
For 1,102 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 63% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 34% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 6 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 68
Highest review score: 100 Zero Dark Thirty
Lowest review score: 0 The Divergent Series: Insurgent
Score distribution:
1,102 movie reviews
  1. Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 1 is slower and stranger than any of the previous films, simultaneously raising hopes for a haunting finale while dimming hopes for a magical one.
  2. He's not in Mark Wahlberg's league, and 21 Jump Street isn't quite as funny as "The Other Guys," but by lampooning himself here, Tatum has bought himself a grace period to grow in.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Point Break is a perfect example of the contemporary "B" movie. And, like a lot of the old B movies, those cheap thrillers of the 1940s and 1950s, Point Break has considerably more raw energy than almost all of the higher-priced products. [12 July 1991, p.3F]
    • St. Louis Post-Dispatch
  3. On a moral-justice level, we’d like to see this worm squirm a little more over his treatment of ex-colleagues before we let him off the hook to say that everyone else was cheating too.
  4. 96 Minutes is a mere introduction to Sociology 101, but it's brisk enough to rustle the reading list and keep the conversation alive.
  5. Of all the films to come out the conflict, Afghan Star is the most provocative, because its message that people are essentially the same is a dubious, double-edge sword.
  6. The macabre comedic undertones are reminiscent of a Coen brothers film like "Blood Simple." But a more apt comparison is to an obscure Canadian bank-heist flick called "The Silent Partner," in which teller Elliot Gould pockets some loot from thief Christopher Plummer. Both movies imitate an American idiom with a provincial accent.
  7. Just misses living up to its name.
  8. The Tree might have suffered from too much symbolism if not for writer-director Julie Bertuccelli's deft touch and Gainsbourg's appealing performance.
  9. If we want a bigger picture, we’ll have to wait for God to green-light “Noah: The Next Generation.”
  10. In the roll call of visually distinctive ’toons, Epic looms large.
  11. Whereas "Chill" attempted to define a generation, "Lies" is more of a statement about the nature and limits of friendship.
  12. Gerwig makes us want to believe that in a city where anything is possible, Francis Ha has the last laugh.
  13. It's the kind of movie that inspires word-of-mouth recommendations by speaking the international language of culture clash.
  14. The most mesmerizing parts of the movie make up a tutorial about how the Muppets are made and moved.
  15. With elements of a musical, a melodrama and a multicultural romance, Where Do We Go Now? is as hard to define as the crossroads region where it's set. But even without a clear signal, it sometimes seems miraculous.
  16. When the smoke clears, heady Farewell stands tall among the movies that view the Cold War at close range.
  17. It's smart, heartfelt, handsome and just mutated enough to sustain interest in a specialized subject.
  18. Given the stormy milieu, The Yellow Handkerchief could have been a sordid slice of life or a maudlin metaphor. But the unhurried direction of Udayan Prasad and the unafraid choices of the sure-footed cast keep this character-driven drama afloat.
  19. Thin Ice resides just slightly south of "Fargo."
  20. Ondine is dipped in whimsy and might have drifted out to sea, but it's bounded on four sides by love stories -- between a father and a daughter, a man and a mermaid, an actor and his co-star, and a director and his country.
  21. Although it has some memorably disquieting scenes, this story of long-delayed justice is sustained by its melancholy more than its thrills.
  22. Denham impressively captures Peter's flintiness, rendering him sympathetic yet not quite likable, and Vicius is just right as the wary Lorna.
  23. Like a train, I Wish is slow to build momentum, then it carries us away in a wondrous rush.
  24. Afghanistan-born Atiq Rahimi has powerfully adapted his own acclaimed novel, but the film is unlikely to play in the Middle Eastern countries to which this plea for sexual equality seems directed.
  25. The multiple cameras that shadow Anker and his novice partner provide unprecedented images. But they also raise unintended questions about the vanishing frontier.
  26. Unexpectedly poignant.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    While the movie is funnier than the book, the drawback of this modernized version is that it loses the timeless quality of the story on the page.
  27. Such a disarming homage to the cinema of the Reagan era that even grouchy gremlins might feel like it's morning in America. But be forewarned that if this movie is exposed to sunlight, you'll notice the puppet strings.
  28. It's guilty of some sleight-of-hand hokum, but in pulling the rug from under the norm, Magic Mike turns a trick.

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