St. Louis Post-Dispatch's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
For 1,512 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 66% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 32% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 6.2 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 70
Highest review score: 100 The Big Short
Lowest review score: 0 The Divergent Series: Insurgent
Score distribution:
1512 movie reviews
  1. Bad Words is often very funny, thanks to Bateman’s brick-wall malevolence and screenwriter Andrew Dodge’s inventively rude dialogue.
  2. What about those who haven’t read the book? Divergent, the movie, still offers a smart, spunky, sympathetic heroine, a hunky love interest and a sobering if rather obvious message about the value of being true to oneself rather than mindlessly conforming.
  3. Periodically deviating from its fly-on-the-wall aesthetic, the film does a noticeably better job than the Joan Rivers movie of incorporating old footage and photos to underscore its subject’s importance.
  4. What the movie crucially lacks is the clockwork complications that produce a payoff.
  5. Jenison, who had never painted a thing in his life, does indeed produce a beautiful work, but we should never forget that Penn and Teller are professional bamboozlers, and their attempt to re-frame the definition of genius might be nothing but smoke and mirrors.
  6. Typically lovely to look at, with big-eyed young people espousing high ideals amid natural splendor. But outside of their bubble, a prickly history looms, and Miyazaki’s dubious attitude toward the wartime role of his hero makes the movie a mixed blessing.
  7. Non-Stop: It is what it is.
  8. In Secret is so stifled, it makes “Les Misérables” look like “Amélie.”
  9. The four leads are entirely engaging including the manic Hart.
  10. This stinker is only good for endless laughs.
  11. A faithful remake of RoboCop would be timely. Instead, the producers of this new version have retreated back to the lab, concocting a creaky hybrid of “Frankenstein” and “Call of Duty.”
  12. A marvelous piece of work.
  13. It’s admirable, but Monuments Men just poses on a porous foundation like a statue.
  14. Garcia’s performance, which won the best actress award at last year’s Berlin International Film Festival, is a marvel of self-effacing artistry.
  15. With Labor Day, director Jason Reitman turns a Nicholas Sparks scenario into an Alfred Hitchcock creep-show.
  16. Although it’s superficially grungy, this true story isn’t much more substantive than something that star Vanessa Hudgens might have made for the Disney Channel and considerably less shocking than her career gambit in “Spring Breakers.”
  17. Kevin Hart hits the vicinity of humor with a few of his drive-by wisecracks, but the movie itself has nothing under the hood.
  18. This dead-on-arrival ’toon is some of the worst p.r. for rodents since bubonic plague hit medieval Europe.
  19. Her
    Her may be the most technologically astute movie since Stanley Kubrick’s “2001: a Space Odyssey.” And as the friendly ghost in the machine, Samantha is a more inviting companion for the great leap forward than HAL9000 could ever dream of being.
  20. For those who appreciate fiery dialogue delivered by fine actors, August: Osage County is heaven-sent.
  21. A good and necessary film, but like the man himself it’s not immune to scrutiny.
  22. The most exhilarating film of the year is also the most exhausting.
  23. Strange hybrid of science lesson and Saturday-morning cartoon.
  24. What Inside Llewyn Davis is all about: the passion, and the pain, of being an artist.
  25. As much as anything, the wildly entertaining ’70s flashback American Hustle is a triumph of style.
  26. OK, the musical ode to Doby the shark elicits a grin, but the low-percentage script is loaded with buckshot, not harpoons, and Anchorman 2 ends up sinking.
  27. On a moral-justice level, we’d like to see this worm squirm a little more over his treatment of ex-colleagues before we let him off the hook to say that everyone else was cheating too.
  28. We were promised desolation, but “The Hobbit” just keeps dragon on.
  29. Out of the Furnace is hot air.
  30. A co-star deserving special mention is Nebraska itself, which Payne films in black-and-white to mirror the austerity of life on the de-populated prairie. These corners of the Cornhusker State are as empty as the promise of a sweepstakes prize. In this land of ghosts, one old pioneer tries to grab his stake before he becomes another windblown husk.

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