St. Louis Post-Dispatch's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
For 1,386 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 66% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 32% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 6.4 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 70
Highest review score: 100 Two Days, One Night
Lowest review score: 0 The Divergent Series: Insurgent
Score distribution:
1386 movie reviews
  1. The film would be incalculably different if the lead role had been divided between two or three young actors for a conventional shoot. But Linklater’s patience allows us to see a thoughtful personality being formed both on and off the screen.
  2. Involves the gradual revelation of the hopes, fears and insecurities of well-observed characters.
  3. Working from a script co-written with Christopher Browne, director Robert Zemeckis (“Forrest Gump”) pulls off a fabulous trick of his own: delivering a mainstream entertainment that has, at its heart, a poetic sensibility.
  4. One of the best films of the year.
  5. Nev and the filmmakers prove to be charismatic, and at times hilarious, investigators of the unfolding mystery.
  6. The combination of a literate script, an adroit cast and an economical style is simple addition that achieves an alchemical feat: the best film of the year.
  7. Bursting with smart dialogue, surprising situations and humor that springs from richly imagined characters.
  8. The conclusion of Christopher Nolan's superhero trilogy is a hugely ambitious mix of eye candy and brain food. If it doesn't have the haunting aftertaste of the previous serving, that's only because Nolan couldn't clone Heath Ledger. But beefy substitute Tom Hardy is a hell of a villain.
  9. Surrender, earthlings. It’s the Guardians’ world and you’ll be happy to live in it.
  10. With Manchester by the Sea writer-director Kenneth Lonergan (“You Can Count on Me”) confirms his status as a major American filmmaker.
  11. Sophisticated comedies have gone out of fashion, largely because Hollywood finds it easier and more profitable to simply gross out moviegoers. But Please Give has real class -- and for that it deserves our gratitude.
  12. It starts as a bittersweet parable about the cruelty of commerce, but the wonder of Searching for Sugar Man will not soon slip away.
  13. Baby Driver zooms onto the screen with an exhilarating combination of smarts and style.
  14. As much as anything, the wildly entertaining ’70s flashback American Hustle is a triumph of style.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    This is Daisy's story, and Hoke's story. It's a beautiful story, filled with warmth and compassion. It was a glorious evening of theater when I saw it, and it's just as glorious on the screen. [12 Jan. 1990, p.3F]
    • St. Louis Post-Dispatch
  15. What Inside Llewyn Davis is all about: the passion, and the pain, of being an artist.
  16. An exciting cloak-and-dagger thriller.
  17. The movie Timbuktu is as fresh as today’s headlines, but it’s paced and photographed like a timeless slice of life. It’s an exquisite, wise and even funny film, easily the best of the year.
  18. Perilous incidents have riveted audiences since Pauline was tied to the railroad tracks, but in the hundred-year history of cinema, few thrillers have been as emotionally compelling as The Impossible.
  19. A cinematic miracle, a film that carves out a vivid space that has nothing to do with wizards or extraterrestrials, but quite a lot to say about the fantastical creatures that roam through the humanity in us all.
  20. A far more interesting film than its title implies. And a film you’ve never seen before.
  21. After feeding on this sweet buffet, sated cinephiles will want to call the front desk to extend their stay.
  22. With visual and psychological precision, Abrahamson brilliantly evokes the experience of living outside of everyday reality. And he does so without resorting to either creepiness or sentimentality.
  23. Into the Abyss makes a strong case for the inhumanity of capital punishment, regardless of the crime or the criminal.
  24. The film offers insights into Iranian society while also subtly making a case that human foibles are universal.
  25. The year’s most exhilarating film.
  26. The result, Pina, is the most spirited and spectacular film about dance since Robert Altman's "The Company."
  27. The Master is not a schematic attack on a particular religion. It is a brilliantly conceived and powerfully realized work of art, with complex characters, exquisite images and ambiguously big ideas.
  28. The Tree of Life is a religious experience. Overtly. Audaciously. Unashamedly. No film has ever reached as high toward the face of God and, in our commodified future, few are likely to try.
  29. Beauty comes to us unexpectedly. That's the message of Poetry, a Korean movie about an aging housemaid that turns out to be one of the best films of the year.

Top Trailers