St. Louis Post-Dispatch's Scores

  • Movies
For 899 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 63% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 34% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 6.9 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 68
Highest review score: 100 The Adjustment Bureau
Lowest review score: 25 The Mechanic
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 64 out of 899
899 movie reviews
  1. The beauty of October Country, beside its artful images, is how it compresses the windblown fortunes of working-class America into the fallen leaves of one forlorn family.
  2. As an exercise in craft, it's surprisingly successful, thanks to the strong cast and the vivid depiction of a modern leader's security apparatus. But as a political statement or personal drama, The Ghost Writer is nearly invisible.
  3. Given the stormy milieu, The Yellow Handkerchief could have been a sordid slice of life or a maudlin metaphor. But the unhurried direction of Udayan Prasad and the unafraid choices of the sure-footed cast keep this character-driven drama afloat.
  4. If all you want from a movie are generous doses of laughs and some tender moments, She's Out Of My League should be right up your alley.
  5. This Swedish sensation is a magic trick that jolts the murder-mystery genre back to life.
  6. Like "The Squid and the Whale," this character study pushes the definition of comedy to the breaking point, and unlike the far less successful "Margot at the Wedding," it leaves us faintly smiling after the workout.
  7. Because the movie captures the period so well and argues so convincingly that the Runaways' very existence was revolutionary, it doesn't have to exaggerate the highs and lows to create a more salable story.
  8. Egoyan doesn't flinch from exploring the dark side of curiosity. That includes dealing with sexuality in a way that might make some moviegoers uncomfortable.
  9. In steering a course between the rock of rude humor and the hard place of perilous drama, How to Train Your Dragon flies high.
  10. The macabre comedic undertones are reminiscent of a Coen brothers film like "Blood Simple." But a more apt comparison is to an obscure Canadian bank-heist flick called "The Silent Partner," in which teller Elliot Gould pockets some loot from thief Christopher Plummer. Both movies imitate an American idiom with a provincial accent.
  11. Although it has some memorably disquieting scenes, this story of long-delayed justice is sustained by its melancholy more than its thrills.
  12. A film that's as much a character study as it is a crime drama. At the heart of it is Caine's hauntingly memorable performance.
    • 27 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Sex and the City 2 will never be compared to "The Godfather, Part II." But it's everything a fan could want in a sequel.
  13. The been-there, done-that nature of the plot doesn't take away from the undeniable sweetness found in Just Wright.
  14. Unfortunately, Garcia can't quite resist sentimentality, giving us an ending that's a bit too emotionally neat. Still, Mother and Child is a thoughtful and provocative film about the way we live now.
  15. Perhaps best appreciated as a character study -- about a character some moviegoers might prefer to avoid. Still, it's a smart, funny film that flirts with the edge.
  16. The documentary ends on a hopeful note, as Indians themselves have taken control of their image.
  17. It's not exactly aiming for the moon, but in a marketplace where surpassed expectations are as rare as unicorns, Despicable Me is delightful.
  18. The surprisingly rich documentary Best Worst Movie views the phenomenon from a unique perspective.
  19. A tamer tale of supernatural shenanigans that is far more appropriate for young children than the sometimes too-scary scenes from J.K. Rowling's stories.
  20. Like the recent "Greenberg," Cyrus is not the jokey, polished production you would expect from its Hollywood cast and LA setting, but audiences who are comfortable with discomfort should find it "funny."
  21. The first half of the film dusts off some kitschy picket-fence footage and alarmist news reports to invoke an era when homosexual acts were illegal in 49 states, and gays were subjected to arrest, electroshock and sterilization.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Weighty issues such as war and divorce are mentioned, but the serious themes pass quickly. The lighthearted story always takes precedent over the special effects, but a scene involving swimming piglets will have kids flashing a sea of smiles.
  22. When the smoke clears, heady Farewell stands tall among the movies that view the Cold War at close range.
  23. The multiple cameras that shadow Anker and his novice partner provide unprecedented images. But they also raise unintended questions about the vanishing frontier.
  24. Best appreciated as an exercise in style. Based on Martin Booth's novel "A Very Private Gentleman," the film establishes and sustains a mood of suspense, but Corbijn seems only minimally interested in conventional thrills.
  25. Moviegoers will know in the first five minutes whether the new B-movie Machete is their cup of tea - or bucket of blood.
  26. Ondine is dipped in whimsy and might have drifted out to sea, but it's bounded on four sides by love stories -- between a father and a daughter, a man and a mermaid, an actor and his co-star, and a director and his country.
  27. Because of some sentimental backspin, Affleck doesn't quite hit it out of the park, but he may provoke the green monster of envy in lesser directors.
  28. With its mix of true-blood romance and full-moon madness, Let Me In should hasten the twilight of the twerpy pretenders.

Top Trailers