St. Louis Post-Dispatch's Scores

For 330 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 63% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 34% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 2.5 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 67
Highest review score: 100 The Corner: Season 1
Lowest review score: 0 Tucker: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 227
  2. Negative: 0 out of 227
227 tv reviews
  1. It's kind of charming, and sporadically funny, but nothing special. [23 Sept 1993, p.8G]
    • St. Louis Post-Dispatch
  2. Not only does all this style interfere with and distract from the show's content, but the strain to be unconventional leads viewers to expect the unexpected, robbing it of dramatic impact. And that's too bad, because there does seem to be something interesting going on here. [10 Jun 1992]
    • St. Louis Post-Dispatch
  3. Queer as Folk tries hard to expand the portrayal of gays on television beyond stereotypes. Unfortunately, the shock factor is so high that few viewers whose minds might be opened seem likely to stick around for the learning experience. [3 Dec 2000, p.C2]
    • St. Louis Post-Dispatch
  4. Brewster Place has chosen to forgo sophistication or subtlety in favor of little homilies that come off just a tad heavy-handed. [30 Apr 1990]
    • St. Louis Post-Dispatch
  5. The laughs - more like chuckles, actually - are predictable, but Jones is a cutie, and he and Sheen are charming together. [22 Sept 2003, p.E6]
    • St. Louis Post-Dispatch
  6. In no way does NYPD Blue even approach the brilliance of Barry Levinson's police drama, "Homicide," which aired briefly last spring and still could return. So if you exercise your right to change the channel when it comes on, you won't be missing greatness. [19 Sept 1993, p.7F]
    • St. Louis Post-Dispatch
  7. The Nightly Show With Larry Wilmore got off to a promising if uneven start Monday on Comedy Central, with Wilmore's opening segment much stronger than a chaotic panel discussion that followed.
  8. Every performance is strong, and the writing is solid. Unfortunately, "Soul Food" has succumbed to premium-cable syndrome, including extremely graphic sex scenes that will put off many viewers who might otherwise have enjoyed it. [28 Jun 2000]
    • St. Louis Post-Dispatch
  9. Peter Pan Live!, while better in many ways than last year's "Sound of Music Live!," was still uneven, partly because of casting and partly because of the dated source material.
  10. Not everything in the first show worked. A too-long segment involving a magic amulet that segued into a commercial for hummus (apparently actual, paid product placement) felt odd, but not unlike many "Colbert Report" bits. An appearance by George Clooney, with nothing to promote, also fell a bit flat. The Bush interview was more successful, although Colbert seemed over-caffeinated or perhaps just over-excited to finally be on the air.
  11. It's not terrible, just standard-issue sitcom, with relationships that don't feel true and laughs that seem forced.
  12. I don’t dislike the show Reckless could be, and Gigandet and Wood are cute together ... But the pivotal case, in which many officers may have drugged and raped a colleague, demands to be taken seriously ... Switching back and forth to lighthearted flirtation feels terribly wrong.
  13. The new Arrested Development is uneven--but Arrested Development always was, even at its peak. Binge-watching, though, makes it seem even more uneven, and that's too bad.
  14. [Creators Ryan Murphy and Brad Falchuk] want to horrify and disgust their audience, pushing well into the realm of slasher porn as perversions, sexual and otherwise, bleed into pleasure killings. Disturbing us is the point, of course, but good horror stories go beyond grotesqueries and gore. American Horror Story: Hotel may do that.
  15. [The cast] throw themselves into Kirstie wholeheartedly, but it's hard not to feel that they're slumming.
  16. Even for MTV’s young target audience, the characters in Scream are remarkably empty and bland. But this is a slasher show, after all.
  17. The show (co-created by Spelling) is standard-issue cable sitcom, with acting that's too broad (Garth is the exception here) and a laugh track that's loud and awkward.
  18. Set in Miami, Ballers is good at showing both the shiny high life of professional athletes and its dark, sad underbelly. But if you’re looking for laughs, keep looking.
  19. “Ballers” and “The Brink,” have their moments, neither provides a lot of laughs.
  20. As executed, it almost seems like a parody of the genre.... Beghe's growly, macho performance is hard to stomach, getting in the way of even noticing the attractive supporting cast.
  21. Fox originally provided a different pilot for Rake, one that wasn't so lighthearted. (Really.) That episode will air later, after, the network hopes, we've come to love this bad boy despite his foibles.
  22. In the first two episodes, a lot of the gags are just stupid: a stuffy man gets a cake in the face; Mary gets caught in a medieval chastity belt...But Taylor makes Mary easy to like, and John Cameron Mitchell provides nice counterpoint as her pal Derrick, who works in fashion photography and has an ironic comment on everything. [9 Sept 1996, p.6D]
    • St. Louis Post-Dispatch
  23. The line between charming and annoying is pretty fine here, and although Ed is indeed a cute show, I finished two episodes feeling more annoyed than charmed. Much of this zaniness seems as forced as the romance between Ed and Carol, which needs more time to develop. Maybe she'll grow to love him. Maybe you and I will, too. [8 Oct 2000, p.F6]
    • St. Louis Post-Dispatch
  24. The first episode does explain the premise pretty clearly--if you pay close enough attention and aren't laughing too hard.
  25. Adrien Brody is impressive as Houdini in the History Channel's two-night biography, and many of his stunts are re-created (and explained) in fascinating detail. But the miniseries, a co-production with Hungary, Houdini's home country, is too slow and too-often hokey to rate a rave.
  26. The judges seem well chosen. Unfortunately, The Taste kicks off with a bland and sluggish two-hour casting session.
  27. [Patrick Stewart is] a fantastic sport about the silly things asked of him, but that just makes it more of a shame that the show's writing doesn't do better by him.
  28. Writer Sarah Phelps has done her best, but short of throwing out Rowling's characters and plot, there was no real way to make The Casual Vacancy bearable.
  29. Together, they're charming, but the "will they or won't they?" romantic tension feels forced, and that takes much of the fun out of it.
  30. One episode does not a season make. But the Season 9 premiere, "New Guys," is as uneven as most episodes have been for the last few years.
  31. There's a plot, which any of us could have written in our sleep.
  32. The acting is pretty much non-existent, casting is weak, and the special effects are unimpressive. But there's some terrific makeup work on some of the non-human creatures around, and somebody went to the trouble of deciding that a space station for many different species would have to be equipped with many different environments to accommodate them...Nice touch. [22 Feb 1993, p.5D]
    • St. Louis Post-Dispatch
  33. “I am confused about everything,” Peter tells his girlfriend before fleeing the scene of a bully smackdown. Sampling The Messengers, you may be too.
  34. There are nice moments, especially from Holloway, whose quips are vastly more clever than the rest of the show.
  35. Szymanski, who directed from a script by Murray Miller, gets the look of the documentary, including some real footage mixed with new scenes made to look vintage, just right. The tone, though, is so broad, we never for a second forget the “mocku” in the “mentary.”
  36. The original pilot was a mess, confusing and annoyingly full of holes, but an extremely well-cast mess with a lot of potential. [17 Sept 1995, p.6C]
    • St. Louis Post-Dispatch
  37. Saldana seems to be sleepwalking through most of it, and we rarely feel Rosemary’s fear. Rather than jumping in your seat, you’re more likely to pick up a magazine.
  38. Do No Harm expects us to accept the dual-personality premise without grounding it in anything believable.
  39. The pace is generally fast enough to distract from the convoluted plot.
  40. The Next adds a door-knock component, providing a Publishers Clearing House-style surprise, and has the stars hang out with their proteges at home, which isn't really as entertaining as you'd think.
  41. If you enjoy animal sight gags, Animal Practice will provide at least a few laughs.
  42. It's hard to know where a middling comedy will go from just the pilot.
  43. Long on scenery and even longer on schmaltz. The kids are fine; Gregory Smith is the show's strongest link as complicated, 15-year-old Ephram, and Vivian Cardone ("A Beautiful Mind") is off-the-scale adorable as 9-year-old Delia. But Williams' conversion to small-town doctor seems forced, and so do the quirks of Everwood residents. It's nothing that a prescription for better writing couldn't fix, however. [16 Sept 2002, p.D6]
    • St. Louis Post-Dispatch
  44. Saving Hope is pretty easy to watch, despite its abundant potential for eye-rolling.
  45. The writing is clunky and the acting is almost universally stiff. The characters need to be much more engaging to keep us from wanting to jump overboard from The Last Ship.
  46. An occasionally funny new TV Land comedy.
  47. The Firm is tedious but not terrible; whether it will be watchable depends, one, on how much you like legal procedurals and, two, how the ongoing McDeeres-in-jeopardy plot is handled in future episodes.
  48. The Whispers (created by Soo Hoo and claiming Steven Spielberg as an executive producer) is too slow and self-consciously creepy to hold my attention for long. Your response may vary.
  49. As for the story, it's so murky and convoluted that following it requires a lot of work--far too much work for something so flat-out ridiculous.
  50. Perhaps over that time, it will evolve into the buddy dramedy it needs to be. Until then, though, it's just another police procedural, and prime time already has plenty of those.
  51. So mainstream, it makes "L.A. Law" look like experimental theater. It's not bad, just very familiar. [4 Mar 1997]
    • St. Louis Post-Dispatch
  52. It's ridiculous, but it doesn't bite.
  53. "Awws" are more frequent than laughs.
  54. Meyers is likable and pleasant, and the first show probably isn't a good indication of what his Late Night will eventually be like. In the early going, though, there isn't much fresh happening there.
  55. It's too silly for real horror fans and too gross for the fainthearted.
  56. The original Chicago Med pilot, which was built into an episode of "Chicago Fire" and is widely available online, was tedious, but that's no sign that the series itself won't stage a remarkable recovery.
  57. I suspect that viewers who know the Bible well will be annoyed by "The Bible," while those who are casual students will be alternately mildly entertained and fairly bored. People with no religious beliefs probably won't watch anyway, but if they do, they could wind up confused or amused.
  58. The audience is expected somehow to understand the range of her abilities, but sorry; we need more clues. That, and a reason to care.
  59. A loud, old-school comedy with Laurie Metcalf ("Roseanne") as mom Marjorie and Tyler Ritter (look-alike younger son of the late John Ritter) as gay son Ronny.
  60. Caruso is stiff and grim, and the crew doesn't click with him or one another. [23 Sep 2002]
    • St. Louis Post-Dispatch
  61. The tone is mostly dreary and the plot with few exceptions goes precisely where you expect.
  62. It's still hard to expect much out of a sitcom arriving on broadcast TV in summer. In the case of NBC's Undateable, that's a good attitude. If you get a few laughs out of it, great. Otherwise, no hopes will be dashed.
  63. Adapted from a Dutch series that was surely better than this, Red Widow is trite and tedious.
  64. Unfortunately, this Dracula isn’t fun at all. It’s not really scary, either, although it does spill a lot of blood.
  65. Enjoying Timecop either requires putting your mind entirely into neutral or simply deciding to suspend a lot of disbelief. I couldn't suspend enough, so I wound up worrying about little things like why the folks of Victorian London, which he visits in tonight's opener, don't think Logan's spiky 1997 haircut is one bit peculiar. [22 Sept 1997]
    • St. Louis Post-Dispatch
  66. Moments of sweetness, but too few laughs - and way too many sexual references. [8 Sep 2002]
    • St. Louis Post-Dispatch
  67. Uneven, from amusing to embarrassing. [8 Oct 2000, p.F6]
    • St. Louis Post-Dispatch
  68. In short, tight, low-cut everything, with her talents always on prominent display, Cox appears so much older than the baby-faced Von Esmarch that their relationship looks perverted, if not illegal. [8 Oct 2000, p.F6]
    • St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Top Trailers