St. Louis Post-Dispatch's Scores

For 433 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 61% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 36% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 1.9 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 67
Highest review score: 100 The Shield: Season 1
Lowest review score: 0 Black Box: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 297
  2. Negative: 0 out of 297
297 tv reviews
  1. If you appreciate challenging, intellectually stimulating drama, this is it...My advice: Watch, absorb, and don't panic if you don't catch every nuance. You'll have time - 23 episodes. [19 Sept 1995, p.6D]
    • St. Louis Post-Dispatch
  2. Riveting, distinctive television that is totally entertaining, in the broadest sense of the word. [8 Apr 1990, p.6G]
    • St. Louis Post-Dispatch
  3. Director Ezra Edelman weaves many voices into a thoughtful slice of American social history, examining the volatile subject of race via intense focus on an athlete so elite, he believed he transcended color. ... If there is a weakness in O.J.: Made in America, it's that the unspooling of the murder trial will feel too familiar, especially for anyone who just watched "The People v. O.J. Simpson."
  4. It might be even better--yes, even better, if exceeding perfection is possible--than the first.
  5. The Americans is one of TV's best drama series, if not the best, and it's also one of the most challenging. There are details to remember, nuances to catch and morality to ponder.
    • 95 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The difficulty of teasing apart these tangled relationships and getting up to speed on backstory will prove too daunting for some viewers, especially those who prefer quick and tidy resolutions. But if you're willing to tolerate some initial confusion, "The Wire" rewards patience. The dialogue is sharply funny and richly colloquial, and the actors are a constant astonishment.
    • St. Louis Post-Dispatch
  6. Homicide is fast-paced but reasonably easy to follow. It is fragmentary at times, but somehow cohesive. It's impressionistic in style, yet driven by plot, enlivened by gallows humor and inhabited by intriguing, amusing, startlingly natural characters...You can think of Homicide as "Hill Street Blues" with more grit and less econo-socio-poli-psycho babble; "Law & Order" without the "order" half; "Twin Peaks" with intelligence and discipline as well as style. "Diner" with cops. [31 Jan 1993, p.7C]
    • St. Louis Post-Dispatch
  7. The second season of HBO's Deadwood gets off to such a sluggish start that fans can be forgiven if -- like saloon boss Al Swearengen -- they worry that change is coming all too fast to the raw, lawless Western town. [6 Mar 2005, p.F03]
    • St. Louis Post-Dispatch
  8. The best cop show of any recent season...It's not for everyone, but it is for anyone who still misses "Homicide" and thinks "NYPD Blue" long ago devolved into soap opera. [10 Mar 2002, p.F2]
    • St. Louis Post-Dispatch
  9. The Americans remains one of prime time's best series, the only negatives at this point being how complicated the plotting is, to the degree at which we almost need a flow chart to keep up. It's a headache, but a great one to have.
  10. The Returned, in French with subtitles, is beautiful, riveting and above all thought-provoking.
  11. In the four episodes provided for preview, the action seldom lags, but just when we think we’re in for a fun ride this season, something darkens the sun.
  12. Quippy, topical but also thoughtful, Master of None is perfectly binge-worthy and thus the ideal Netflix show. If you start watching, be sure to set aside time for all 10 episodes.
  13. Razor-edged satire of late-night talk TV from people with an ear for truth and a taste for blood. [14 Aug 1992]
    • St. Louis Post-Dispatch
  14. Apparent familiarity doesn’t make The Night Of any less involving, though, in large part because of Ahmed’s charismatic and sympathetic performance as Naz.
  15. For the better, Atlanta is a comedy that's not satisfied with making viewers laugh; it has something to say.
  16. An astonishing achievement, a miniseries that manages to put human faces on the drug culture in American neighborhoods. [16 Apr 2000, p.F9]
    • St. Louis Post-Dispatch
  17. Insightful and even important as it is, The People v. O.J. Simpson: American Crime Story succeeds best as riveting entertainment. Just as with the original trial, it’s hard to stop watching.
  18. HBO’s deeply involving and completely draining miniseries.
  19. Riveting. [21 June 2005, p.E1]
    • St. Louis Post-Dispatch
  20. The best new sitcom to come along in years. [2 Nov 2003, p.C4]
    • St. Louis Post-Dispatch
  21. It's rare to be able to say, unconditionally, that a TV reality show is inspirational, and that everyone will be better for watching. But that's the case with MasterChef Junior.
  22. [A] sense of humor keeps Hannibal from being unbearably dark even when the crimes are, and they always are.
  23. Freaks and Geeks is a grittier "Wonder Years," while retaining some of that show's sweetness. The writing is sharp, and the young stars are vividly, awkwardly real. Spending an hour with them is almost worth going back to high school again. [24 Sept 1999, p.E10]
    • St. Louis Post-Dispatch
  24. Twists that are genuinely surprising, plus quirky humor, separate Top of the Lake from, say, AMC’s “The Killing,” which was also deliberately paced but unrelentingly dour as well.
  25. Gosh, I love this show. Meet Felicity and prepare to fall in love. [29 Sept 1998]
    • St. Louis Post-Dispatch
  26. The line between charming and annoying is pretty fine here, and although Ed is indeed a cute show, I finished two episodes feeling more annoyed than charmed. Much of this zaniness seems as forced as the romance between Ed and Carol, which needs more time to develop. Maybe she'll grow to love him. Maybe you and I will, too. [8 Oct 2000, p.F6]
    • St. Louis Post-Dispatch
  27. Often uncomfortable to watch, sometimes hilarious soap opera, UnREAL is also both intelligent and thought-provoking, one of TV's smartest and most cynical shows.
  28. Lost is a sci-fi soap opera adventure -- with humor, mystery and interesting characters galore...It's "Survivor" with the one thing "Survivor" lacks -- a terrific script.
    • St. Louis Post-Dispatch
  29. Outstanding. [21 July 2004, p.E01]
    • St. Louis Post-Dispatch
  30. Given how much is right about Fargo, the real reason to watch and keep watching is the storytelling, with more surprises per hour than you can count.
  31. Dark but delightful.
  32. Anyone who watches won’t soon forget A Poet in New York, one of the best things on television this year.
  33. The half-star markdown in the rating for Nashville is a knock on Panettiere, whose performance seems too broad, especially in the face of such naturalistic acting from everyone else in the cast. But that flaw can't keep Nashville from being a superb series.
  34. Clearly, Rescue Me isn't for everyone, but the fearless, funny series is don't-miss viewing for its legions of fans. [13 June 2007, p.L15]
    • St. Louis Post-Dispatch
  35. The Missing, written by brothers Harry and Jack Williams and directed by Tom Shankland, is sometimes grueling to watch. But it earns a place in haunting crime drama next to the recent “Broadchurch” and “Top of the Lake.”
  36. The entire cast of The Normal Heart is outstanding, but no one stands out more than Bomer, who is so much the handsome star of USA's "White Collar," in the beginning, then almost unrecognizable as the dying Felix.
  37. A thoroughly captivating production. ... You'll want to have a couple of blank videotapes ready for this one. [31 Mar 1991]
    • St. Louis Post-Dispatch
  38. A fascinating and challenging new drama series. [27 Oct 1996]
    • St. Louis Post-Dispatch
  39. Instead of expanding it, in the stage-to-screen tradition, screenwriter-director Richard Eyre (“The Hollow Crown”) chooses to close it in, setting it entirely in the theater and reverting, he says, to the original Ronald Harwood play. That makes The Dresser both claustrophobic and sometimes numbingly talky, especially given the fast pace of the chatter and the range of accents. This can all be a struggle for American viewers, but persist and the result should prove worth it.
  40. Take a look if you think all the good drama is on cable.
  41. Everything about Insecure, though, is not just palatable but completely charming, thanks to Rae’s relatable honesty and irrepressible humor.
  42. In no way does NYPD Blue even approach the brilliance of Barry Levinson's police drama, "Homicide," which aired briefly last spring and still could return. So if you exercise your right to change the channel when it comes on, you won't be missing greatness. [19 Sept 1993, p.7F]
    • St. Louis Post-Dispatch
  43. Chances are, it will make you cry even more often than it makes you laugh, but it will rarely bore you.
  44. The quality of the material, all of which is written by the performers themselves, is spotty, to be sure. But when it hits, it has that "on the edge" feeling that makes you squirm as much as it makes you laugh. [21 July 1989, p.9E]
    • St. Louis Post-Dispatch
  45. A quieter start to Season 3 feels welcome but never flat.
  46. Throughout, this new Roots is great entertainment, full of action and romance, an engrossing yarn about people who feel very real and relatable. But just as the original “Roots” had a powerful emotional impact on Americans, the new one is likely to do so as well, especially given that questions of race are at the forefront of discussion as much now as ever.
  47. Matthew Weiner clearly intended for us to contemplate the mortality of his TV masterpiece when he wove Peggy Lee’s bleak 1969 ballad through Sunday’s midseason premiere.
  48. The first hour, provided for preview, is spectacular even when seen without completed special effects.
  49. What's best about Catastrophe is how engaging the characters of Rob and Sharon are, and how quickly we come to root for them.
  50. Although it isn’t a line-for-line adaptation, it is almost excruciatingly faithful to the tone of Christie’s book, building tension as skillfully as the author did.... Fans of British mysteries, cozy or edgy, won’t want to miss it.
  51. Even if you barely understand a thing that’s going on (and be patient; chances are you will), Legion is a joy to watch, surreal and beautiful, with as many funny asides as frightening moments.
  52. The Dust Bowl, collecting so much oral history that was about to pass away, is a treasure.
  53. Viewers looking for something different, and very funny, should latch on to The Tick and not let go. [8 Nov 2001, p.E1]
    • St. Louis Post-Dispatch
  54. The Honorable Woman is intriguing from the start, but almost in spite of itself, as everyone seems to have a dark secret and nothing is what it seems.
  55. Each weekly episode of The Night Manager will feel too short. But the pleasure is so great that we should probably thank AMC for letting it stretch out over six weeks.
  56. The Crown is as beautifully filmed as could be, with scenes in Malta and Kenya as well as Balmoral in Scotland. The costuming is meticulous, as is the choreography of everything from dressing to mealtime to a train trip. Deliberate pacing (naysayers might say slow) allows time to appreciate all this.
  57. Lemony Snicket is dark and funny, campy and whimsical.
  58. The Mindy Project has never been more of a modern rom-com than in its Season 4 premiere.
  59. Insightful, intelligent and very, very funny, the WB's Gilmore Girls is the best not-quite-drama, not-quite-comedy of the new television season. [5 Oct 2000, p.F6]
    • St. Louis Post-Dispatch
  60. A quirky mix of light and dark, humor and grit, sentiment and substance -- "The O.C." if scripted by Raymond Chandler. [21 Sept 2004, p.E1]
    • St. Louis Post-Dispatch
  61. Together, they're TV's Cute and Quirky Couple of the Year. Speaking of cute and quirky - Dharma & Greg sometimes tries a little too hard to be both. But mainly, it's delightful. [24 Sept 1997, p.8E]
    • St. Louis Post-Dispatch
    • 80 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    A fascinating and disturbing vision. [21 Mar 2004, p.F5]
    • St. Louis Post-Dispatch
  62. Endeavour is most interesting for the light it sheds on the character development of young Morse.
  63. From the start, this 2015 Project Greenlight is both educational and completely entertaining. This is a show that was more than worth reviving.
  64. Leeves is a hoot as Daphne, and provides leavening to Mahoney's self-centered gruffness. This could all work out, I guess; these characters (except possibly Dad) could grow on us, and in the post-"Seinfeld" time slot, they're likely to get a chance. [16 Sept 1993, p.6G]
    • St. Louis Post-Dispatch
  65. It's hospital drama in the "St. Elsewhere" mold - but, so far, with less humor. [18 Sep 1994]
    • St. Louis Post-Dispatch
  66. Better Things is really about relationships between mothers and daughters, poignant and frustrating and human and hilarious. At telling that story, it's the best.
  67. Even if we find ourselves a bit lost, though, as we might early on in Season 2, there are many rewards in Orphan Black that have nothing to do with its mythology.
  68. The premise may sound more sad than funny, but fortunately, it's not. That's due in large part to Fowler, who like his character has cerebral palsy and is anything but pitiful. Both are smart and funny and determined to be their own person, no matter the obstacles.
  69. The twists that follow are many, and to reveal even one would be giving away too much. But be assured that The Witness for the Prosecution is fascinating, maddening and ultimately heartbreaking.
  70. Once it relaxes, however, Scrubs turns out to be a thoughtful show that has dispensed with a laugh track and proves amusing enough not to need one. (Now, let's dispense with those fantasies.) Shot with a single camera in a former hospital, it aims for the exaggerated realism and the light-meets-dark tone of "M*A*S*H" -- a worthy ambition even if it doesn't get there. [2 Oct 2001, p.F1]
    • St. Louis Post-Dispatch
  71. Yes, One Day at a Time is old-school enough to shoot live, with multiple cameras, but it's not one of those joke-punchline sitcoms in which everyone pauses while the audience cheers. Instead, we feel as if we're watching real people, who may fight noisily but come back together out of love.
  72. Its origins [British-French co-production] make Spotless more thoughtful and more deliberately paced than a comparable U.S. show might be. There is dark humor along with the drama, and entertaining action as well.
  73. With only a single episode available for preview, it's difficult to gauge what Esmail will do with that time and how much Slater (in the pilot, a goofy oddball) will alter the tone. But fans of smart thrillers, and tortured heroes, will want to stick around to find out.
  74. Superb characterizations and riveting action are leavened by wry humor, making Deutschland delightfully addictive.
  75. Joan of Arcadia is smart, entertaining and never heavy-handed, one of the season's best. [26 Sept 2003, p.E8]
    • St. Louis Post-Dispatch
  76. Beyond its off-putting title, this is the freshest, wackiest romantic comedy/musical fantasy hybrid of this or any recent season.
  77. Braugher is such a riveting actor, with so much going on behind his eyes, that he'd probably be interesting reading a list of school closings on the first snow day. [10 Oct 2000, p.F1]
    • St. Louis Post-Dispatch
  78. Manhattan is in other class entirely, the kind of series that is so good, it lifts a network into a whole new tier. What “Mad Men” did for AMC, Manhattan could do for WGN.
  79. It’s terrific. How you respond to it, though, may depend on your mindset as you come into the show. Don’t lower your expectations; dismiss them altogether.
  80. UnREAL is clearly exaggerated for shock value, but it somehow feels more true to life than those "happily ever after" love stories the originals serve up.
  81. The Season 4 premiere is solid in most ways.
  82. The Good Place takes off in absurd, insane and delightful directions, with episodes so rich in asides and throwaway bits that they might need to be watched more than once.
  83. Bryan Dykstra was excellent as LBJ in the Rep’s solid production, but the movie, directed by Jay Roach, is almost a different animal, both intimate and broad, giddily exuberant and deeply dark. A bonus: On film, we hear every witty and/or disturbing line.
  84. The Americans isn't just a heart-pounding action drama; by presenting heroes who are also villains, it also confronts viewers with TV's deepest moral dilemma since "The Sopranos."
  85. This is a comedy. And it’s a good one, warm and charming, genuinely funny, and also odd enough to come from Tina Fey and writing partner Robert Carlock.
  86. Sneaky Pete is less weird [than Netflix's "Lemony Snicket's A Series of Unfortunate Events"] but still wonderful.
  87. Involving, enjoyable TV. [5 Oct 1999, p.D6]
    • St. Louis Post-Dispatch
  88. This sunny and touching yarn feels like just what we need in these angst-ridden days.
  89. The Bridge translates brilliantly, fitting into its new setting so perfectly, you’d never imagine it had aired in any other incarnation.
  90. Two later episodes parody the TV series "Vice" and "Nanook of the North," the 1922 silent film credited with launching the documentary genre. Both are well done, and each has a twist. Each also has an awful lot of Hader and Armisen in costume, so take that as an endorsement or as a caution, depending on your feeling about them. I didn't laugh, but maybe you will.
  91. A Canadian-South African co-production, it's gracefully directed by Clement Virgo ("The Wire") and gorgeously filmed, mostly in South Africa. Soapy? A little, but so was "Roots."
  92. It is exciting and involving; its leads are charismatic; and most of all, it feels fresh. [18 Sep 1994]
    • St. Louis Post-Dispatch
  93. Anyone still missing "Parenthood," or "Brothers and Sisters" before that, should grab the tissues and settle in for tonight's This Is Us.
  94. Atmospheric, showing a side of Italy no travelogue would touch, Gomorrah is also fast-paced, covering so much ground in two episodes provided for preview that most series would already be over.
  95. McDonald is flawless in her performances of Holiday’s songs, nailing the jazzy-bluesy (or was it bluesy-jazzy?) delivery. Her own voice is pure and clear, but McDonald captures Holiday’s rough sound, rougher still and sometimes slurred at the end of her life.
  96. If The A Word sounds dark and depressing, it isn't. Joe's autism is the central plot point, but this is also a messy soap opera about a family that's always butting heads.
  97. The final Downton season is satisfying, engaging and nostalgic.
  98. In the Flesh, which runs just three hours over the three nights, is best not analyzed too deeply for meaning and just enjoyed for its odd and fascinating concept.

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