The A.V. Club's Scores

For 3,891 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 64% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 34% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 1.8 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 74
Highest review score: 100 Siamese Dream [Deluxe Edition]
Lowest review score: 0 The Beginning
Score distribution:
3891 music reviews
    • 80 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Compared to Maritime's ragged debut, Glass Floor, the new record is a fountain of confidence, forgoing its predecessor's fussy arrangements for simple structures and big hooks.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    [Rainer Maria] drapes songs in atmospheric echo while maintaining a steady, urgent beat--all of which provides a stage for Caithlin De Marrais' earnest, fully engaged voice.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Boots fuses sexuality and celebration with naked politics just as seamlessly as he combines irreverent humor and heartwarming humanism.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    It's unlikely that any other album will sound much like The Drift this year, and even less likely that it could be forgotten if heard even once.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    As the price of success, The Obliterati faces significantly higher expectations. Once again, though, Burma succeeds and surprises by playing to its strengths while moving forward.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    A happily unpredictable record.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Like The Coup's strangely simpatico latest album, Lif's frisky, humane Mo'Mega redefines what a political rap album can be.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Rather Ripped is unmistakably a Sonic Youth album, right down to the snatches of amp-on-fire distortion, the tuneless speak-singing of Thurston Moore and Kim Gordon, and an emphasis on guitar texture that includes amplifying each strummed string. But the conventional rock-song structures of "Incinerate," while not unheard of for Sonic Youth, here feel unexpectedly and warmly classicist.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Even in its darkest moments, a humane glow envelops the album, which takes her already-arresting sound and expands it to widescreen.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Strap on some headphones and enjoy the ride.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    A great summer record it remains, even in the dead of winter.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Post-War is easily M. Ward's most accessible album to date, charged with a bouncy spirit.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Most of To The Races is arresting and alive, filled with little moments--a snaky violin, a warm harmonica, a lilting melody--that serve as reminders of how important the concept of "performance" can be.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Especially in its superior second half, the album resonates with casual ambition as it reconciles ?uestlove's effortless bohemian cool and sonic perfectionism with Black Thought's dark swagger, street-level sociology, and silver-tongued virtuosity.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    These songs are complicated robots.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    This is Yo La Tengo in full 32-flavors mode, but somehow, as with similarly diverse past efforts like I Can Hear The Heart Beating As One, they make it all sound cohesive.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    The band's fourth album Awoo keeps the lyrical restraint, but restores some of the energy of The Hidden Cameras' early work, in more of a rock 'n' roll vein.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    There's nothing here that Beck hasn't done before, but it sounds unexpected once again.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    The triumph of Boys And Girls is that it's full of the kind of songs that Finn's protagonists would crank up, relishing every power chord.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Van Occupanther's spell finally breaks a little more than halfway through its 11 tracks, when the songs begin to feel more fussed-over and conceptual and less organic, but the warmth never fades.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    His hushed voice and intricate acoustic guitar work fill the space with reflective songs that sound little like anything he's done before.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Nelson sounds like he's giving it his all, and everyone around him rises to the occasion.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Ys
    For those willing to let go a little and drift, Ys can be an amazing journey, especially when Parks' strings and Newsom's harp lock into a seductive dance, or when her voice catches one of the fleeting snatches of melody and rides it until it escapes.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Waits may call them orphans, but another artist would call this a career.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Both hauntingly beautiful and a helpful summary of Stevens' career to date.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    It contains a smart, tight, cohesive analysis of where rap went astray, but also the seeds of the genre's rebirth and renewal.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Friend Opportunity is adventurous and strange, but not insular. It lets everyone share the triumphant feeling of a puzzle reaching completion.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Phantom Punch's palette contains dollops of everyone from The Clash to The Sea And Cake to name-your-favorite-shoegaze-band, but most of all, the album's freewheeling energy brings to mind Supergrass' finest moments.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    What's most impressive is how guileless Dunckel and Godin make it sound. They're aiming for a kind of naïve beauty, and they hit it consistently here.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Fantastic.