The A.V. Club's Scores

For 5,445 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 49% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 48% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 2.4 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 59
Highest review score: 100 City of God
Lowest review score: 0 Battle of the Year
Score distribution:
5,445 movie reviews
  1. Tattoo is as much mood piece as mystery, and the mood is almost always disturbing.
  2. Bittersweet and beautifully realized, harsh but humane, Greenberg is a self-consciously small film that nevertheless leaves an indelible mark.
  3. A surprisingly intimate behind-the-scenes documentary.
  4. A documentary that doubles as a comic thriller, and it’s as entertaining as it is thought-provoking.
  5. Some people might find it distasteful to make a movie about guilty rich folks who give themselves permission to splurge. Others will rightly appreciate the honesty.
  6. A Piece of Work is the antithesis of Jerry Seinfeld's engaging but superficial 2002 documentary "Comedian": where the innately private Seinfeld holds nearly everything back, Rivers loudly broadcasts the kind of fears, anxieties, and ambitions most people would do anything to hide.
  7. Restrepo can be tedious at times and nerve-racking at others, but why shouldn't it be? That's exactly what Junger and Hetherington saw on the front lines, so that's what they show, with very little filter.
  8. The film is an imposing, prismatic achievement, and strongly resistant to an insta-reaction; when it’s over, Nolan still seems a few steps ahead of us.
  9. So what happens when people forget about all those people he stalked and snapped? Will his collection still be seen as an invaluable store of late 20th-century art, or the work of a celeb-obsessed hoarder?
  10. It acknowledges grief, horror, and loss, but never lets it get in the way of a big, bright laugh.
  11. Cholodenko's casually observant style perfectly matches the cast's thoughtful work, though the film ultimately proves more successful at creating messy situations than trying to resolve them.
  12. In the propaganda-filled realms of politics, sports, and the military, that kind of no-bullsh-- -allowed truth feels cathartic. No wonder the Tillman family has spent much of the last 10 years fighting for it.
  13. Zuckerberg's story ends up feeling bigger than his own life.
  14. Carlos is mostly tense and thrilling, revealing the poisonous side of global citizenship.
  15. Finds connections deeply embedded in a soccer culture fueled by the country's thieving cocaine trade.
  16. Viewers may not realize how far they've been pulled in until the movie ends, and they might feel a sense of loss that it can't keep going just a little while longer.
  17. A florid, often lurid, completely enthralling film held in place by a disarming Portman, who rarely leaves the frame.
  18. It's ultimately a tale of heroism in the face of fearsome, powerful opposition, but as stubborn pride masquerading as ideological purity proves Wilson's Achilles heel, the film's heroes reveal themselves as flawed to an almost fatal extent, and messily, fascinatingly human.
  19. It does justice to a subject who made his life and death works of art.
  20. Rabbit Hole is a tremendously sad movie, but it's also the furthest thing from a miserablist wallow.
  21. The Coens direct True Grit with a light touch, but like Portis' stark, funny novel, their adventure tale shaves off none of the rough edges.
  22. The result is one beautiful movie-and no less so for making a strong case that beauty is a lie.
  23. The performances are winning, the story is surprising without relying on unlikely twists, and the relationships are the richest and most nuanced since Leigh's "Secrets & Lies."
  24. It helps that the actors' faces are so mesmerizing, particularly Manjinder Virk as Lorraine.
  25. Louder Than A Bomb is a different kind of high-school movie, brimming with life and hope instead of social-climbing, bullying, and furtive first kisses.
  26. More about well-observed moments of everyday life than it is about heightened melodrama.
  27. The great Kôji Yakusho stars as a revered samurai who decides that enough is enough, and sets about assembling the assassins of the title like a men-on-a-mission movie.
  28. Like its fellow crowd-depressor "Blue Valentine," Beautiful Boy offers the antithesis of escapism: a claustrophobic, punishingly intense, beautifully measured exploration of the depths of human despair.
  29. Submarine is the film "Youth In Revolt" should have been, an achingly sad yet ribald account of a hyper-verbal oddball's ascent/descent into manhood.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    One Lucky Elephant would make an affecting pairing with James Marsh's upcoming "Project Nim," another film about an animal treated like a human until its essential wildness made that impossible.

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