The A.V. Club's Scores

For 443 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 60% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 36% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 3.2 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 68
Highest review score: 100 The Hollow Crown: Season 1
Lowest review score: 0 Marshal Law: Texas: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 287
  2. Negative: 0 out of 287
287 tv reviews
  1. The Comeback is the same as it ever was, and more highly concentrated. It still out-metas anything else on television. The performances remain stellar all around.
  2. Ansari and Yang come out of the gate strong, showcasing who they are and how they view the world with a clarity and assuredness that few others have been able to master.
  3. The docudrama is at its most powerful in its second half, as the focus shifts more toward David Bradley as William Hartnell.
  4. Game Of Thrones has not moved away from “sexposition,” prostitution, and casual rape as titillating plot points, and that will always tarnish what is otherwise a groundbreaking show. But the good outweighs the bad. Game Of Thrones was and is an astonishing achievement.
  5. Fitting for a star whose improvised podcast appearances frequently turn down dark alleyways, Review really gets going when it digs deep into horrible behavior.
  6. Veep has become the clearest heir to 30 Rock and Arrested Development, and specific bits throughout the season recall both series.
  7. Younger is an entertaining and heartwarming series and one fans of Bechdel-busting television should seek out.
  8. It’s not that Portlandia has lost its sharp comic edge; rather, it has added a complementary sweetness that is somehow just as funny.
  9. Agent Carter ... could be The Flash to S.H.I.E.L.D.’s Arrow: the brighter, snappier sister-show that finds its footing much more quickly than its sibling.
  10. Burton And Taylor is not comprehensive or perfect as a film--the direction in particular is lackluster--but as a character study in both writing and acting it is, as Burton says of Taylor herself, “peerless.”
    • 77 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Black-ish, is fun, cool, and hip. It just so happens to also have a lot going on upstairs.
  11. For the most part, Lannan and Haigh have crafted something that’s bittersweet and funny and surprisingly quiet, willing to simply let the characters hang out and try to figure out what the rest of their lives are going to be like.
  12. Skillfully directed, impeccably designed, and brilliantly cast, Jonathan Strange & Mr Norrell is as charming, and as dark, as it could ever hope to be.
  13. Greenlight is better than it’s ever been, but its claim to the title of best filmmaking reality show has been usurped. That distinction now belongs to Starz’s The Chair.
  14. The result is a show that isn’t always “ha ha” funny, but is scathingly brilliant.
  15. From episode three on, [Sheen] begins to give one of the most fascinating performances on TV.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Strike Back retains its refreshingly simple approach to matters of conspiracy by keeping the action and the characters’ minds on the mission in front of them.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Comparisons to The Wonder Years are inevitable, but Everybody Hates Chris scrapes away much of that golden nostalgia by putting a funny spin on frequently painful times.
  16. Togetherness threaten to become too familiar; it isn’t rote, but feels like it could become rote at any moment before swerving away from the expected outcome with seconds to spare.
  17. The show may have been simplified due to budgetary concerns, but that makes its core themes shine all the brighter.
  18. It’s Me, Hilary becomes a warm evocation of a time gone by, similar to Knight’s old drawings of the Plaza.
  19. Orange occasionally seems overpopulated, assuming the audience doesn’t hold all of the characters in equal regard. Orange works better when it’s focused on what unites its inmates, not what divides them.
  20. Brooklyn Nine-Nine is a tight, funny pilot where the energy of the cast salvages the few down moments. Still, it lays some possible traps for the rest of the series, not the least of which is the ever-present temptation of cop-show cliché.
  21. As impressive as Sam is--a teenager trapped inside an old man’s body who never seems bothered by his circumstances--when the documentary focuses on his mother, it easy to see where he gets it from.
  22. As a technically proficient piece of visual storytelling, Boardwalk continues to excel.
  23. The series is at its most potent when it reframes the everyday in the context of the Cold War, like Philip comparing notes on home life with a Mossad operative or Elizabeth displaying a flash of vulnerability in front of a government-contracted dupe. (And then betraying that parental bond by turning it into a threat.) Other aspects of the show would do well to find this middle ground; they’re getting there in season two.
  24. Deutschland 83 is a stylish take on the spy genre that carefully balances its humor with high stakes, and with Nay as an anchor, promises that this is a spy caper worth a few summer weeks.
  25. The show initially relies too heavily on plots in which Cam’s career is imperiled by the family’s behavior, plots that come off as contrivances to give the family deeper roots in Cam’s world. But Remorse finds its sea legs once it realizes Cam’s family can afford to stand on its own, whether they realize it or not.
  26. Generation Cryo separates itself from the likes of Catfish and Teen Mom by not treating its subjects as spectacle. They’re portrayed as people dealing with issues that affect their everyday lives, recalling some of the better installments of the True Life series.
  27. The show is funny, but never gut-bustingly so; it’s most often a triumph of atmosphere, a hangout show with a tremendous (and too infrequently engaged) sense of tension.

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