The A.V. Club's Scores

For 4,128 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 64% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 34% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 1.8 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 74
Highest review score: 100 Life...The Best Game In Town
Lowest review score: 0 The Path of Totality
Score distribution:
4128 music reviews
    • 54 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    The Rainbow Children contains one good song, a ballad called "She Loves Me 4 Me," buried beneath layers of spiritual horseshittery.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    Maybe it worked on the stage, but taken out of context the result is a two-hour "Huh?" of an album.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    The singer spends most of Evolve dithering on elastic, airy, funk-jazz excursions that convey few opinions or emotions, not to mention hooks.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    The tossed-off quality of his recent work may be liberating to Black, but it's not likely to be so satisfying to his audience.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    While Discovery embraces the cheesiness of the lamest of lame music, the strategy frequently comes across as gimmickry. The album isn't so much fun as it is silly, and while Daft Punk's members may just be musical smart-alecks, funk hasn't sounded this resoundingly stupid since Bootsy Collins' squiggly solo work.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    An album that features all of his worst tendencies and almost none of his good ones.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    The few moments on Wonderland that make sense in the context of the band's history are overshadowed by a musical reach that exceeds its grasp.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    Johnston's voice rarely melds with Linkous' production, and it loses its gritty charm amid such dignified surroundings.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    It's a sweet, open, daringly earnest album in which the sad old Cuomo does battle with the wise old soul Cuomo wants to become. By conventional wisdom, it should never work as a rock album, and most of the time, that conventional wisdom is dead on.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    10
    Cool J has backed off from proclaiming himself the greatest rapper of all time at every possible opportunity, which is fortunate: His claim on that title has never been shakier.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    Alive & Amplified sounds so slick that it slips right by.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    All too often finds X-Ecutioners playing second fiddle to an outsized roster of uninspired guests.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    Those who've moved beyond efforts to scare mom and dad will do well to steer clear, though they've probably made that choice already.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    Instantly forgettable... consistently tepid, devoid of personality, and characteristic of a considerable talent on auto-pilot.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    The group's familiar sound returns intact, but the songs just aren't there; most of them fade into a distressing mid-tempo mush while plodding through the paces at half speed.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    At times, the album sounds like a lost collaboration between Nick Drake and Jethro Tull, and one that might have best stayed lost.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    Love has nothing new to say and no better way to say it.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    Setting aside the abhorrent "Original Prankster," which plumbs new depths of Yankovic appropriation--and throws in a stupid Rob Schneider sample to boot--the bulk of the album indulges The Offspring's preferable loud-fast-shrill side... Conspiracy Of One's crowd-pleasing novelty idiocy doesn't run much deeper than its single, and while that may disappoint those who enjoyed Americana, it makes it The Offspring's most tolerable record in years.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    While the continued drive to mix up its sound remains admirable, the weak spots are downright deadly, making Open feel sort of like a between-albums goof, an experiment strictly for the fan club.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    A must only for the hardest of the hardcore Pollard fans, its subtitle--Failed Experiments And Trashed Aircraft--should not be ignored. It takes 17 tracks to hit a song ("Spring Tigers," from the aborted 1992 album Back To Saturn X) that sounds like a regrettable exclusion, and the consistency doesn't pick up from there.... if nothing else, it's a fine warehouse of great song titles...
    • 70 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    Mann's signature wordplay sounds clichéd and exhausted, and her melodies lack the energy and pop sparkle that distinguished her pre-Lost In Space work.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    The last adjective that could ever describe NdegeOcello's music is "dull," but that's just the damnation to apply to the new Comfort Woman, along with "inexplicable," "meandering," and "inexplicably meandering."
    • 60 Metascore
    • 25 Critic Score
    If A Letter Home worked to privilege and highlight songwriting tools like melody and lyricism, Storytone does the opposite, overwhelming any inherent heart or soul in Young’s original compositions.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 25 Critic Score
    Not all of Fortune is so unctuous, but none of it is inspired.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 25 Critic Score
    The music is ferocious, catchy, and arguably the band’s best since the early ’90s; but many of Dystopia’s lyrics have nauseating connotations.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 25 Critic Score
    Although the new album opens promisingly with Beach Boys-esque a cappella before kicking into a handful of bland yet workable pop-punk tunes, the middle backslides into watered-down dance-rock.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 25 Critic Score
    An utter wreck that curiously, miraculously, might have been great.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 25 Critic Score
    A Better Tomorrow has very little to do with the music of 20 years ago, but it has even less to do with the music of today; it’s completely out of joint, an island of irrelevance forced into being by the labor- and drama-intensive nature of the group.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 25 Critic Score
    Think Lavigne's "Girlfriend" without the hooks, but with a discernable degree of emo introspection.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 25 Critic Score
    It's a narrow frame of reference that The Raveonettes seem likely to stick with; hopefully, on future albums, the songs will get more memorable than this batch.