The A.V. Club's Scores

For 3,617 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 64% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 34% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 1.6 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 73
Highest review score: 100 Body Talk
Lowest review score: 0 Graffiti
Score distribution:
3,617 music reviews
    • 50 Metascore
    • 25 Critic Score
    Although the new album opens promisingly with Beach Boys-esque a cappella before kicking into a handful of bland yet workable pop-punk tunes, the middle backslides into watered-down dance-rock.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 25 Critic Score
    Time hasn't been kind to the once-popular amalgam of metal and hip-hop known as nü-metal, and it's been absolutely brutal to former scene king Limp Bizkit
    • 37 Metascore
    • 25 Critic Score
    Contrary to its emphatic title, I'm Back! Family And Friends isn't so much a full-fledged comeback album as a mildly inspiring three-song EP surrounded by truly horrible re-recordings and remixes of Stone's biggest hits of the late '60s and early '70s.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 25 Critic Score
    As a folksinger, he undeniably blows: There's simply nothing appealing or compelling about his forced, tuneless, featureless vocals, and without a strong frontman like Zack De La Rocha or Chris Cornell, flaccid attempts at rocking out like "It Begins Tonight" render Rebel Songs even weaker than if he'd stuck strictly to folk.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 25 Critic Score
    Most of SuperHeavy is frankly unlistenable, lacking even the professionalism and solid chops of late-period Stones records.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 25 Critic Score
    Maniacally narcissistic, Evanescence is corny in the way only music so grim and humorless--and yet irredeemably stupid--can be
    • 45 Metascore
    • 25 Critic Score
    An utter wreck that curiously, miraculously, might have been great.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 25 Critic Score
    Shallow and overwrought, with periodic echoes of Ke$ha's Valley Girl aloofness, the album lives down to the harshest preconceptions against pop music.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 25 Critic Score
    Ultimately, these mid-tempo, mid-volume tunes flounder in mediocrity.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 25 Critic Score
    An undistinguished slog of an album that counts an atrocious cover of "16 Tons" as one of its many grating moments.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 25 Critic Score
    Not all of Fortune is so unctuous, but none of it is inspired.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 25 Critic Score
    Mr. Blue Sky is the musical equivalent of George Lucas changing a few of the special effects in the Star Wars films and then re-issuing them (again).
    • 42 Metascore
    • 25 Critic Score
    There's only so much blood to be squeezed from that stone, so instead, Somethin 'Bout Kreay contents itself with using that stone to bash listeners over the head.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 25 Critic Score
    [A] vacant record-by-the-numbers.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 25 Critic Score
    This is a bag of potato chips that’s 80 percent air, unconvincingly trying to pass itself off as a full meal.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 25 Critic Score
    Khalifa’s 2011 breakthrough, Rolling Papers, compensated for his bland rapping with sticky pop hooks, and even his 2012 snoozer, O.N.I.F.C., offered some varied production to offset the tedium, but there are no such respites on Blacc Hollywood, an album every bit as vacant and unappealing as the artist who made it.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 25 Critic Score
    If A Letter Home worked to privilege and highlight songwriting tools like melody and lyricism, Storytone does the opposite, overwhelming any inherent heart or soul in Young’s original compositions.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 25 Critic Score
    A Better Tomorrow has very little to do with the music of 20 years ago, but it has even less to do with the music of today; it’s completely out of joint, an island of irrelevance forced into being by the labor- and drama-intensive nature of the group.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 20 Critic Score
    Horrorscope is glossy, artless, proficient, and dull enough to be easily tuned out...
    • 63 Metascore
    • 20 Critic Score
    Even lineup changes and inter-group squabbling couldn't stop the trio's commercial winning streak, but a massive shot of independence just might. Brilliantly crafted songs from some of pop music's top songwriting ringers have played a key role in Destiny's Child's success, but Survivor finds frontwoman Beyoncé Knowles taking over the reins, co-writing and co-producing nearly every track.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 20 Critic Score
    It vacillates between insignificant fluff and confessional songs that have nothing new to confess.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 20 Critic Score
    Ghetto Postage illustrates P's unwillingness to learn from past mistakes. The names may change, with No Limit newcomers like Krazy, Afficial, and Slay Sean filling in for the AWOL Mystikal and the inexplicably absent Mia X, but P's formula of endlessly repeated choruses, feeble thug-life lyrics, and generic, low-end-heavy beats remains as tiresome and unrewarding as ever.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 20 Critic Score
    Worst of all, the album closes with three decent songs, reminders of Phair's talent that are muted by what's come before.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 20 Critic Score
    Shows how slavish reproduction curdles into artistic bankruptcy.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 20 Critic Score
    With Lions, the band has dropped its biggest dud, a moribund disaster with no more than a tiny handful of salvageable songs.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 20 Critic Score
    Even modest expectations can't salvage the clunky, ponderous American Life, which fares only slightly better than "Hanky Panky" and Swept Away on her list of offenses.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 20 Critic Score
    St. Anger suffers mightily for its thin, washed-out sound.... A messy, unsatisfying misfire.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 20 Critic Score
    The musical equivalent of Willie Mays stumbling around in the outfield years after his skills were gone, Crown Royal fails in the most arbitrary, impersonal way possible, piling on so many ringers that Run DMC often seems like a guest at its own party.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 20 Critic Score
    The group's vaunted eclecticism starts to feel random and jittery, the mark of short attention spans and an inability to maintain a cohesive tone. Furthermore, the Peas' lyrics--already their Achilles heel--have somehow managed to devolve even further.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 20 Critic Score
    This is more a marketing plan than an album.