The A.V. Club's Scores

For 3,794 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 64% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 34% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 1.8 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 73
Highest review score: 100 Black Up
Lowest review score: 0 The Beginning
Score distribution:
3794 music reviews
    • 88 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    The duo's self-proclaimed "remedy" is nowhere near as revolutionary as the hype would insinuate, but it does offer its distinct pleasures
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Playing exactly like past Thievery Corporation albums that sounded preordained from the start, The Richest Man In Babylon adopts various degrees of swagger and repose, but the cumulative effect is striking mostly for its vacancy.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    At moments lush and beautiful, at others overly busy, but never less than daring.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    As a hard punch of melodic garage rock, Velocity works just fine; it's certainly as serviceable as just about anything by The Vines.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Tomorrow's Sounds Today returns to a more conventional approach, with 14 full-band songs replete with strings, slides, and electric guitars. As is frequently the case, however, more is less, with Yoakam settling for modestly ambling charmers in lieu of transcendent moments.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    This Way is somehow both ambitious and down-to-earth compared to its predecessors.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Unlike its predecessor, Day I Forgot falters noticeably in spots.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    For the most part, Are You Passionate? feels like an after-hours session, its songs weary and a little lost, but at times, Young makes those qualities work for him.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    This is Young's strongest set of songs in years, but the disc just isn't compelling.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    It's no small achievement that Young makes these seasoned vets sound like a loose bar band, reveling in sloppiness and barely held together by his searing guitar work.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    With Time Bomb, Buckcherry still makes the unfashionable seem fashionable, but that doesn't make it any less dumb.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Volume 2 features some nice experiments, notably the droning "Schram And Sheddle 262," the Krautrock-cum-punk of "Telstar Recovery" and "High Pitch Needs," and the Eno-pop of "Circulation," but the disc is too diffuse, disjointed, and (in its own sloppy way) derivative to hold together. Interesting ideas abound, though, and Volume 2's lack of cohesion could lead to a breakthrough some time soon, especially considering Warren's rapid evolution and incessant output.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    On
    By the time On reaches its finale, it's stored up enough goodwill that it's more than possible to believe that there's an art to all this artlessness.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Distinguished, eclectic, and difficult to love.... Mostly the songs beg for a rawer treatment, instead of the polite album-rock for which Jagger generally settles.
    • The A.V. Club
    • 80 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Like Neil Young's Silver And Gold, it feels like a thematically empty, knockabout place-holder. American Recordings, one of Cash's towering classics, was all devotion and doubt, a brilliant, raw-boned meditation on redemption and death. A loose, flat set of odds and ends, Solitary Man is merely a minor but endearing record from a man who seems to know he's given more than enough.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    It doesn't always work, and even when it does, there's no getting around the unshakable sense that Clinton is a side project above all else, with none of the transcendent moments found on Cornershop's albums.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    More interesting than essential, Iron Flag may not win over those who gave up on Wu-Tang Clan around the time of Wu-Tang Forever, but the group's dedication to its own idiosyncratic path remains impressive.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    An amiable assortment of summer-radio fare, its only cardinal sins being its calculated and characteristic adherence to trends and "Stay On," an ill-conceived collaboration with 311's Nick Hexum.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    As always, the marriage of hooks and psychological horror works well, but for the first time it also starts to wear a little thin. The album's second half is dominated by weaker songs and lyrics that really need a fuller range of human emotion.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Nothing here pushes power-ballad buttons quite as overtly as past smashes "Name" and "Iris," but that shouldn't stop Gutterflower's songs from turning up in a Meg Ryan movie or two soon enough.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Even the highlights are bogged down by ambitious aims that translate blindness as blandness.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    It's more or less business as usual, with a few highlights balancing a fair amount of filler.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    As always, Smash Mouth is all but impossible to hate, offsetting its bald-faced mercenary intentions with a refreshing lack of pretension.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    In fleeting moments, Gray's remarkable charisma dominates The Trouble With Being Myself, but the missing ingredient is too often a simple lack of hooks.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    About half of the album plods through bland, wispy material that gasps for hooks to latch onto and gives Orton too much room to show off her limited vocal range.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    For all its impressive competency, Anxiety Always remains a bit too oppressively literal in its electro resurrection.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Trampin' hardly counts as a misstep, but it's her least impressive showing since her return.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Ten albums into its career, U2's emphasis on its basics--chiming guitars, a war-themed lament here and there, the enormous choruses of songs like "Beautiful Day"--is a refreshing reminder of the group's core virtues. But in terms of execution, it splits about 50-50 between soaring hits and dispiriting misses.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    One of the few creatively adventurous singers to maintain a presence on country radio, Krauss continues to subtly press the boundaries of her sound, but it's hard to imagine anything on New Favorite alienating the masses.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Nothing on The Cure really soars.