The A.V. Club's Scores

For 4,129 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 64% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 34% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 1.8 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 74
Highest review score: 100 The King Is Dead
Lowest review score: 0 The Great Escape Artist
Score distribution:
4129 music reviews
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    There Is Love In You, his first proper album in five years, is smoother still, and to great effect—if this isn’t the best Four Tet record yet, it’s certainly a fresh face for Hebden.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Laced throughout all of it are generous, wide-eyed melodies of a kind that makes for swooning sighs and curious feelings of instant nostalgia.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    By boldly expanding the parameters of mainstream hip-hop, Fiasco's threatening to make rap a welcoming place for geeks and iconoclasts as well as pimps and thugs.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    All the elements of previous White Stripes records surface again, but in weirder, more intense strains that don't break with Jack and Meg White's past, yet don't slavishly adhere to it, either.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    A lush, impeccably produced, musically adventurous, emotionally resonant examination of the way relationships are both strengthened and damaged by distance, the album surpasses Gibbard's other career highpoints, which is really saying something.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    The songs themselves are as lush and prickly as anything Merritt's ever made.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Marry Me, seduces with one hand and stabs with the other.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Kala is such a resolutely strange, sweltering album that it's thrilling to be alive in an era when such a thing can lay claim to the mantle of "pop."
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    The Steinski myth has grown in the darkness of bootlegs, but this long-overdue release proves that the reality more than lives up to the legend.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Wavvves is about as simple as its author’s pedigree, but wildly more intriguing.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Veckatimest offers more than just an inventive exercise in collage: It’s like hearing the past few centuries of music playing in symphony, which sounds--thrillingly and reassuringly--like the future.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Chesnutt put out his first solo album 19 years ago, yet At The Cut’s jarringly personal songs hit new peaks.
    • 96 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    The meticulously constructed cathedrals of guitar sounds on Siamese Dream--so clean and melodic, yet also heavy-make the album more comparable to A Night At The Opera or Boston than Nevermind or Vs.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Charly Bliss has made a record as alive and irrepressible as anything I’ve heard in years.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    The pull of European cool against Oldham's usual rustic, heartfelt love poetry creates moments of sweet tension.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Like both artists' most transcendent work, Madvillainy retains its mystery and wonder after dozens of listens.
    • The A.V. Club
    • 95 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Lamar trusts every idea to stand on its own. When you’re making art this substantial, vital, and virtuosic, there’s no need to wrap a tidy bow around it.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    The album seems beamed in from the early '70s, and probably should've happened in the '90s, but as modern psychedelia increasingly becomes the domain of electronic music, Demolished Thoughts feels right on time--an organic reminder of what can happen when a couple of analog geniuses sit down in a room together and hit "record."
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Granted, Fucked Up’s ambitious full-lengths are always going to snag the most attention. But when it comes to chronicling the group’s heart, recklessness, and rabid devotion to the fine art of the punk anthem, Couple Tracks is the true classic.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    It's a gorgeous descent for an inimitable group that knows better than most how to deliver its highs high and its lows low.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    That exercise in tension and release, repeated throughout the record, is essential to Teens Of Denial’s blistering greatness. The distortion-laden songs on Teens Of Denial build and soar, often repeatedly within a few minutes.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    New Moon is thankfully, wonderfully full.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Most of the songs on The Family Afloat jump through their share of hooks and phases, few of which seem honed for maximum catchiness. Instead, they leave generous breathing room for Bobby Gallivan's free-associative, episodic lyrics.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    This new pack is smart, immediate, and anthemic in the way only bedroom-pop fanatics can muster.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    It’s the flip side of the same gorgeous, engaging coin, and it’s more than just a placeholder while the next National album marinates--it stands shoulder to miserable, brilliant shoulder.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    With Open Your Heart, The Men have taken that breath. And it's only made their hearts beat faster.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Underside feels like a quantum leap from [its 2015 self-titled debut] both musically and thematically, newly charged with the righteous anger of Antifa and Black Lives Matter, and explosively unleashed by artists and activists who sense that this is their moment to seize. The result is a collection of songs that articulates that fury and despair with such authority, it deserves to become the soundtrack for whatever future documentary montage captures the mess of 2017.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    For the first time, the cantankerous Lightburn matches his lyrics--from rapture to self-exploration to joy both lived and missed--perfectly with the music, which nods to Britpop but never succumbs to any genre trappings.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    As painful as it is to recommend an overpriced monument to corporate synergy, the deluxe set really is a treat for hardcore Petty-heads.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    John Schmersal's noisy, scratchy guitar (he performed the same duty for Brainiac in the '90s) and Toko Yasuda's honey-smooth vocals (which deliver the big hooks) seem like an odd contrast on paper, but work perfectly.