The A.V. Club's Scores

For 4,187 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 65% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 33% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 1.9 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 74
Highest review score: 100 Black Up
Lowest review score: 0 The Beginning
Score distribution:
4187 music reviews
    • 75 Metascore
    • 67 Critic Score
    There’s maturity and depth to the songwriting and production on that track that suggest a way forward for Charli XCX, and coupled with the other hits on the record, make Sucker an accomplished, if fitful listen.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 67 Critic Score
    The album backs up its momentous tone, but builds too few moments.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 67 Critic Score
    The downside of all this bombast is that the album, taken as a whole, can feel ponderous.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 67 Critic Score
    Listeners who buy into B's unique worldview on I'm Gay (I'm Happy) will quickly discover that while he's far from a political trailblazer, at least he's completely sincere.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 67 Critic Score
    For fans of Russian Circles' heavier predilections, Station might be a little boring; the band has grown stingier with the bombast, which in turn means less excitement--Russian Circles are most impressive when they rock out.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 67 Critic Score
    Gimme Some is retreat to light-hearted pop after the coolly received electro experiments of 2009's Living Thing. The style suits them, even when the substance is lacking.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 67 Critic Score
    For a debut, Perch Patchwork feels oddly transitory, but suggests good things when the band decides what to transition to.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 67 Critic Score
    For all its sonic worldliness, Memphis is more on the level of early, good-time Beach Boys records like Surfin' USA and Little Deuce Coupe.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 67 Critic Score
    Cave feels like a group that's comfortably going in circles, not finding a fresh way to do what it's already done.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 67 Critic Score
    Obits' second album, Moody, Standard, And Poor, could use a little less logic and a lot more shock.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 67 Critic Score
    Any singer-guitarist who can reduce Stereolab, The Postal Service, New Order, and The Flaming Lips into an indistinguishable acoustic muddle is a musician who may have carried aesthetic purity too far. Beam succeeds best on songs like his own 'Sinning Hands.'
    • 72 Metascore
    • 67 Critic Score
    All of this is creative and fun, but also a little half-baked, and ultimately impersonal.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 67 Critic Score
    With Sonik Kicks, Weller's silk-and-smoke voice sounds as good as ever, and his status as a soulful, folky, yet forceful songsmith remains ironclad. Next time around, though, an extra round of editing might not hurt.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 67 Critic Score
    He fares less well on ballads--here’s hoping 'Hark The Herald Angels Sing' and 'O Come All Ye Faithful (Adeste Fideles)' don’t become live staples. But he eases into 'The Christmas Blues' adroitly, and rips up a cover of Brave Combo’s polka classic 'Must Be Santa' with lightning vocal delivery.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 67 Critic Score
    Fire showcases the still-maturing, melodic, sometimes very heavy post-hardcore that Thrice is forging a career out of, minus any of the emo inclinations from the band's earlier records (no whining, some screaming). By contrast, disc two, Water, focuses on Thrice's reenactment of Radiohead circa Kid A, with 27 minutes of internalizing, electro-glitch pop steered around by up-front, friendly vocals.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 67 Critic Score
    These Days… is a dense, complicated animal--even the blandest tracks have enough tricks to reward multiple listens, and may reveal themselves with time. But for someone so comfortable wearing his poetic heart on his sleeve, the black-lipped pastor has made an oddly distant album.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 67 Critic Score
    The Gaslight Anthem deserve credit for stretching so far on Get Hurt; it’s just too bad the band spreads out in so many directions without committing to any of them.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 67 Critic Score
    While the performances, production, and arrangements on Busting Visions are uniformly excellent, the songwriting is not.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 67 Critic Score
    Even when things pick up on volume three, which includes choice collaborations with California stalwarts like Snoop Dogg, Too $hort, Kendrick Lamar, and Hieroglyphics, Block Brochure feels like too much of a good thing-way, way too much.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 67 Critic Score
    With a running time of nearly 70 minutes for just 12 songs, The Devil Put Dinosaurs Here can be overwhelming; the arrangements of several songs are amorphous, and tunes such as “Phantom Limb” and “Hung On A Hook” could benefit from an editor. Despite these small quibbles, the album is solid.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 67 Critic Score
    Even with its moments of flawed excess, Not The Actual Events is so full of new ideas compared to the relatively “this again?” nature of Hesitation Marks or The Slip that it deserves its place in the NIN catalog.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 67 Critic Score
    There isn't a bad song on Beyond—though both of Barlow's contributions slow things down a bit—but it never reaches the transcendent, wailing energy of Mascis' best.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 67 Critic Score
    The two halves wouldn't necessarily sound better shuffled together--both are pretty uneven.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 67 Critic Score
    For all the promise held out by the idea of Lindstrom staring down long tracks with thematic aims, the range on display is surprisingly narrow. None of the narrowness is exactly bad, but the widescreen potential was so high.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 67 Critic Score
    While Gone Now features a few cuts that are much more piercing than you might expect, it doesn’t quite go all the way.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 67 Critic Score
    It seems erratic, but it somehow works, at least musically.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 67 Critic Score
    Taken on its own, it’s another sumptuously produced, artfully crafted statement from one of the few rap stars with a truly individualistic aesthetic. It’s also too long and stubbornly low energy, nowhere near the knockout Drake’s been building it up to be since practically before he began recording it.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 67 Critic Score
    Metaphors are short-lived and abstract, and Wolf spends lots of time philosophizing or generalizing.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 67 Critic Score
    All the elements are here, though they're on the darker end of the coal/diamond spectrum, and the mostly unremarkable bonus tracks don't do the set any favors. But when it's good, it's damn good, and through the murk, there's the sound of a band that would one day be truly great.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 67 Critic Score
    The contrast of Weiss’ effortlessly sophisticated, crystalline vocals with the icier tone of the band’s newly electronic slant certainly gives Fall Forever special character. Fear Of Men hasn’t survived the sophomore turn without losing a few traces of what made the band so appealing initially, but then again, Weiss says it herself in “Erase (Aubade)”: “I erase these things / I don’t need what I left behind.”